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Articles by Suzanne Craft
Total Records ( 3 ) for Suzanne Craft
  Maria C. Carrillo , Andrew Blackwell , Harald Hampel , Johan Lindborg , Reisa Sperling , Dale Schenk , Jeffrey J. Sevigny , Steven Ferris , David A. Bennett , Suzanne Craft , Timothy Hsu and William Klunk
  The purpose of the Alzheimer's Association Research Roundtable meeting was to discuss the potential of finding diagnostic tools to determine the earliest risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Currently, drugs approved for AD address symptoms which are generally manifest after the disease is already well-established, but there is a growing pipeline of drugs that may alter the underlying pathology and therefore slow or halt progression of the disease. As these drugs become available, it will become increasingly imperative that those at risk for AD be detected and possibly treated early, especially given recent indications that the disease process may start decades before the first clinical symptoms are recognized. Early detection must go hand-in-hand with qualified tools to determine the efficacy of drugs in people who may be asymptomatic or who have only very mild symptoms of the disease. Devising strategies and screening tools to identify and monitor those at risk in order to perform ”prevention” trials is seen by many as a top public-health priority, made all the more urgent by an impending growth in the elderly population worldwide.
  Reisa A. Sperling , Paul S. Aisen , Laurel A. Beckett , Laurel A. Beckett , Suzanne Craft , Anne M. Fagan , Takeshi Iwatsubo , Clifford R. Jack , Jeffrey Kaye , Thomas J. Montine , Denise C. Park , Eric M. Reiman , Christopher C. Rowe , Eric Siemers , Yaakov Stern , Yaakov Stern , Maria C. Carrillo , Bill Thies , Marcelle Morrison- Bogorad , Molly V. Wagster and Creighton H. Phelps
  The National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer‘s Association charged a workgroup with the task of developing criteria for the symptomatic predementia phase of Alzheimer‘s disease (AD), referred to in this article as mild cognitive impairment due to AD. The workgroup developed the following two sets of criteria: (1) core clinical criteria that could be used by healthcare providers without access to advanced imaging techniques or cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and (2) research criteria that could be used in clinical research settings, including clinical trials. The second set of criteria incorporate the use of biomarkers based on imaging and cerebrospinal fluid measures. The final set of criteria for mild cognitive impairment due to AD has four levels of certainty, depending on the presence and nature of the biomarker findings. Considerable work is needed to validate the criteria that use biomarkers and to standardize biomarker analysis for use in community settings.
  John C. Breitner , Laura D. Baker , Thomas J. Montine , Curtis L. Meinert , Constantine G. Lyketsos , Karen H. Ashe , Jason Brandt , Suzanne Craft , Denis E. Evans , Robert C. Green , M. Saleem Ismail , Barbara K. Martin , Michael J. Mullan , Marwan Sabbagh and Pierre N. Tariot
  Background Epidemiologic evidence suggests that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) delay onset of Alzheimer‘s dementia (AD), but randomized trials show no benefit from NSAIDs in patients with symptomatic AD. The Alzheimer‘s Disease Anti-inflammatory Prevention Trial (ADAPT) randomized 2528 elderly persons to naproxen or celecoxib versus placebo for 2 years (standard deviation = 11 months) before treatments were terminated. During the treatment interval, 32 cases of AD revealed increased rates in both NSAID-assigned groups. Methods We continued the double-masked ADAPT protocol for 2 additional years to investigate incidence of AD (primary outcome). We then collected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 117 volunteer participants to assess their ratio of CSF tau to Aβ1-42. Results Including 40 new events observed during follow-up of 2071 randomized individuals (92% of participants at treatment cessation), there were 72 AD cases. Overall, NSAID-related harm was no longer evident, but secondary analyses showed that increased risk remained notable in the first 2.5 years of observations, especially in 54 persons enrolled with cognitive impairment––no dementia (CIND). These same analyses showed later reduction in AD incidence among asymptomatic enrollees who were given naproxen. CSF biomarker assays suggested that the latter result reflected reduced Alzheimer-type neurodegeneration. Conclusions These data suggest a revision of the original ADAPT hypothesis that NSAIDs reduce AD risk, as follows: NSAIDs have an adverse effect in later stages of AD pathogenesis, whereas asymptomatic individuals treated with conventional NSAIDs such as naproxen experience reduced AD incidence, but only after 2 to 3 years. Thus, treatment effects differ at various stages of disease. This hypothesis is consistent with data from both trials and epidemiological studies.
 
 
 
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