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Articles by S.C. Edwin
Total Records ( 3 ) for S.C. Edwin
  M. Moorthy , C. Mehala , S. Saravanan and S.C. Edwin
  Two hundred and eighty commercial layer chicks belonging to single hatch were purchased from local hatchery, wing banded, weighed and randomly allotted into four treatment groups with four replicates of ten chicks each. The chicks were reared in cages in a gable roofed, open sided house. All the chicks were provided with uniform floor, feeder and waterer space and were reared under standard management conditions throughout the experimental period. Treatment groups were T1- control; T2-0.1% aloe vera powder; T3-0.1% aloe vera + 0.1% Curcuma longa powder and T4-0.1% of aloe vera and 0.1% of probiotic powder There was significant (p<0.05) difference in hen housed egg production, feed conversion ratio and return over feed cost in one percent aloe vera fed group compared to other treatment groups. No significant difference was observed in feed consumption, percent hen day egg production and percent broken eggs. It can be concluded that inclusion of 0.1 percent aloe vera in White Leghorn diet is economical compared to its combination with turmeric and probiotic at 0.1 percent level.
  M. Moorthy , S. Saravanan , C. Mehala , S. Ravi , M. Ravikumar , K. Viswanathan and S.C. Edwin
  Two hundred and eighty commercial layer chicks belonging to single hatch were purchased from local hatchery, wing banded, weighed and randomly allotted into seven treatment groups with four replicates of ten chicks each. The chicks were reared in cages in a gable roofed, open sided house. All the chicks were provided with uniform floor, feeder and waterer space and were reared under standard management conditions throughout the experimental period. The experimental diet was formulated according to the standards prescribed in Bureau of Indian Standards (B.I.S., 1992). The treatment groups were T1-Control; T2-0.1% aloe vera; T3-0.1% turmeric; T4-0.1% probiotic; T5-0.1% aloe vera + 0.1% turmeric; T6-0.1% aloe vera + 0.1% probiotic and T7-0.1% turmeric + 0.1% probiotic powder. There was no significant difference in feed consumption. Hen housed egg production, hen day egg production and return over feed cost differ significantly after 40 weeks of age during the experimental period. The overall mean per cent broken eggs differ significantly (p<0.05) among treatment groups but no significant difference was observed in overall mean feed conversion ratio per dozen eggs during the experimental period.
  M. Moorthy , S. Ravi , M. Ravikuma , K. Viswanathan and S.C. Edwin
  Two hundred and ten commercial, straight run day-old Vencobb broiler chicks belonging to single hatch were purchased from local hatchery, wing banded, weighed and randomly allotted into seven treatment groups with three replicates of ten chicks each. The chicks were reared in broiler cages in a gable roofed, open sided house. All the chicks were provided with uniform floor, feeder and waterer space and were reared under standard management conditions throughout the experimental period of six weeks. The treatments were T1-Control; T2-0.2% Ginger powder; T3-0.2% Pepper powder; T4-0.2% Curry leaf powder; T5-0.2% Ginger + 0.2% pepper; T6-0.2% Ginger + 0.2% Curry leaf powder and T7-0.2% Pepper + 0.2% Curry leaf powder. The mean body weight (g/bird) of broilers at 6 weeks of age fed with different inclusion levels of dried ginger, pepper and curry leaf powder differ significantly (p<0.05) among treatment groups at six weeks of age. The feed conversion ratio was significantly (p<0.01) superior in ginger-curry leaf (T6) and pepper-curry leaf powder (T7) fed groups compared to control. But the feed consumption did not differ significantly among treatment groups because of isocaloric and isonitrogenous diet. The mean return over feed cost of T2 and T5 was significantly (p<0.01) higher when compared to other treatment groups at sixth week of age. The carcass characteristics viz. pre-slaughter, New York dressed, eviscerated weights, ready-to-cook percentage, abdominal fat percentage and giblets weight did not differ significantly between the treatment groups fed different levels of dried ginger, pepper and curry leaf powder from 1-6 weeks of age.
 
 
 
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