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Articles by S. Soderberg
Total Records ( 4 ) for S. Soderberg
  M. Wallander , S. Soderberg and A. Norhammar
 

Aims High levels of leptin and low adiponectin are associated with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular (CV) disease. We studied the prognostic implications of leptin and adiponectin in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) without previously known Type 2 DM.

Methods One hundred and eighty-one patients were included. Based on an oral glucose tolerance test at hospital discharge (day 4–5), 168 (67% men) had normal or abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT), defined as impaired glucose tolerance or T2DM. Sex- and age-matched healthy persons served as control subjects (n=185). The associations between fasting serum leptin and adiponectin (day 2) and newly discovered AGT and CV events (CV mortality, non-fatal stroke, reinfarction or severe heart failure) during a median follow-up of 34months were investigated.

Results Compared with control subjects, patients of both genders had significantly higher levels of leptin 2days after an AMI. These levels were higher than those obtained at hospital discharge and 3months later. Circulating levels of (ln) leptin 2days after the AMI predicted AGT at discharge (odds ratio2.03, P=0.042). Ln leptin at day 2 was the only biochemical variable that significantly predicted CV events both on univariate [hazard ratio (HR) 1.60, P=0.018] and on multivariate analysis (HR 1.75, P=0.045). Adiponectin levels did not differ between patients and control subjects and did not relate to AGT or CV events.

Conclusions Elevated circulating levels of leptin on the first morning after an AMI are associated with the presence of AGT at discharge and with a poorer long-term prognosis.

  W. G. Gao , Q. Qiao , J. Pitkaniemi , S. Wild , D. Magliano , J. Shaw , S. Soderberg , P. Zimmet , P. Chitson , S. Knowlessur , G. Alberti and J. Tuomilehto
  Aims To develope risk prediction models of future diabetes in Mauritian Indians. MethodsThree thousand and ninety-four Mauritian Indians (1141 men, aged 20–65 years) without diabetes in 1987 or 1992 were followed up to 1992 or 1998. Subjects underwent repeated oral glucose tolerance tests and diabetes was diagnosed according to 2006 World Health Organization/International Diabetes Federation criteria. Cox regression models for interval censored data were performed using data from 1544 randomly selected participants. Predicted probabilities for diabetes were calculated and validated in the remaining 1550 subjects. ResultsOver 11 years of follow-up, there were 511 cases of diabetes. Among variables tested, family history of diabetes, obesity (body mass index, waist circumference) and glucose were significant predictors of diabetes. Predicted probabilities derived from a simple model fitted with sex, family history of diabetes and obesity ranged from 0.05 to 0.64 in men and 0.03 to 0.49 in women. To predict the onset of diabetes, area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AROC) of predicted probabilities was 0.62 (95% confidence interval, 0.56–0.68) in men and 0.64 (0.59–0.69) in women. At a cut-off point of 0.12, the sensitivity and specificity were 0.72 (0.71–0.74) and 0.47 (0.45–0.49) in men and 0.77 (0.75–0.78) and 0.50 (0.48–0.52) in women, respectively. Addition of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) to the model improved the prediction slightly [AROC curve 0.70 (0.65–0.76) in men, 0.71 (0.67–0.76) in women]. ConclusionsA diabetes prediction model based on obesity and family history yielded moderate discrimination in Mauritian Indians, which was slightly inferior to the model with the FPG but may be useful in low-income countries to promote identification of people at high risk of diabetes.
  N. M. Grantham , D. J. Magliano , S. K. Tanamas , S. Soderberg , M. P. Schlaich and J. E. Shaw
 

Aims

A very limited number of prospective studies have reported conflicting data on the relation between heart rate and diabetes risk. Our aim therefore was to determine in a large, national, population-based cohort if heart rate predicts the development of diabetes.

Methods

The Australian Diabetes Obesity and Lifestyle study followed up 6537 people over 5 years. Baseline measurements included questionnaires, anthropometrics and blood and urine collection. Heart rate was recorded in beats per min (Dinamap). An oral glucose tolerance test was performed at baseline and follow-up, and diabetes was defined using World Health Organization criteria.

Results

A total of 5817 participants were eligible for analysis, 221 of whom developed diabetes. Compared with participants with a heart rate < 60 b min-1, those with a heart rate ≥ 80 b min-1 were more likely to develop diabetes (odds ratio 1.89, 95% CI 1.07-3.35) over 5 years, independent of traditional risk factors. This relationship was highly significant, particularly in non-obese men (odds ratio 5.61, 95% CI 1.75-17.98), but not in their obese counterparts or in women.

Conclusions

Resting heart rate is associated with an increased risk of diabetes over a 5-year period, particularly among non-obese men. This suggests that sympathetic overactivity may be a contributing factor to the development of diabetes, and that resting heart rate may be useful in predicting risk of Type 2 diabetes in non-obese men.

  M. Lilja , M. Eliasson , M. Eriksson and S. Soderberg
 

Aims

Most Swedish studies show stable diabetes prevalence despite increasing obesity, but glucose levels may shift upwards below the diagnostic threshold for diabetes. Our aim was to explore trends in glucose distribution in northern Sweden; whether these trends were uniformly distributed throughout the spectrum of glucose concentrations; and to relate trends to traditional risk factors and the obesity-related adipokine leptin.

Methods

The project consisted of four cross-sectional surveys between 1990 and 2009, with 7069 participants aged 25-64 years. The overall participation rate was 74.4%. Trend analyses of glucose concentrations along the entire distribution and linear regression in relation to survey years and risk markers were used.

Results

Fasting and post-load glucose increased in women (both P < 0.001) and post-load glucose in men (P = 0.004). The increase was seen in most deciles of glucose concentrations. The prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance doubled in women to 14.5% and tripled in men to 10.1% (both P = 0.004). The prevalence of impaired fasting glucose rose in women from 4.5 to 7.7% (P < 0.001). The prevalence of diabetes was unchanged-6.4% in 2009. In men, leptin, together with traditional risk factors, explained 7.8 and 10.8% of the variance in fasting (P = 0.008) and post-load (P < 0.001) glucose, respectively.

Conclusions

Increasing fasting and post-load glucose concentrations were seen in most deciles of the glucose distribution, indicating a shift in the entire population. Leptin was significantly associated with fasting and post-load glucose in men.

 
 
 
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