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Articles by S. M Sereika
Total Records ( 4 ) for S. M Sereika
  E. R Chasens , S. M Sereika and L. E. Burke
 

Purpose

This secondary analysis examined the effect of excessive sleepiness on daytime function in older adults with diabetes from the National Sleep Foundation's Sleep and Aging poll.

Methods

Respondents were older adults (N = 1506; age range, 55-84 years) evaluated by telephone survey on their sleep duration, sleep disturbances, daytime functional outcomes, and self-reported height, weight, and comorbidities.

Results

Approximately 16% (n = 244) of the sample acknowledged a diagnosis of diabetes; they were older, had more comorbidities, had a higher body mass index (BMI), and were more likely to be sleepy during the daytime than nondiabetic respondents (all P < .05). Respondents with diabetes who reported frequent daytime sleepiness (n = 50; 20%) had significantly (P < .05) higher BMI, lower self-rated health, and more sleep disturbances than those who were not sleepy (n = 194). Sleepy respondents with diabetes also reported more frequent feelings of depression, decreased pleasure in life, naps, feeling drowsy, or dozing off while driving (all P < .05). Excessive sleepiness was significantly associated (P < .001) with an increased risk for depressive symptoms while controlling for BMI, age, and number of comorbidities.

Conclusions

These results indicate that sleep disturbances affect not only sleep quality but also daytime function in older adults with diabetes.

  M. M Cothran , S. M Sereika , A. R Fischl , P. L Schmitt and D. Charron Prochownik
 

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to develop, implement, and evaluate the effectiveness of a self-instructional preconception counseling (PC) training program for Certified Diabetes Educators (CDEs) to enhance PC knowledge and self-efficacy.

Methods

A 1-group, pre-post test study was conducted with 31 CDEs from a large medical center in western Pennsylvania. The self-instructional program included selected readings, such as the American Diabetes Association's position statement on PC of women with diabetes and an interactive CD-ROM, "Reproductive-Health Awareness for Teenage Women With Diabetes" ("READY-Girls"). Paper-and-pencil knowledge and self-efficacy questionnaires regarding PC and pregnancies of women with diabetes were completed by the CDEs before and immediately following the self-instructional program. Upon completion, participants received 5.0 Continuing Nursing Education contact hours (CNEs) from the State Nurses Association.

Results

Prior to receiving the program, all of the participants indicated they would benefit from further training on PC. Pretest knowledge scores averaged in the 70th percentile; following the program, the participants significantly increased (P < .01) PC knowledge and self-efficacy in providing PC to women with diabetes, including adolescents.

Conclusions

Although CDEs knew relevant information, they lacked some specific knowledge about PC, and they lacked confidence in their knowledge and in their ability to counsel patients. Diabetes educators can benefit from an education program to provide PC to their female patients, including adolescents. Computer or Web-based accessibility could make this a low-cost and easily disseminated program.

  K Yang , E. R Chasens , S. M Sereika and L. E. Burke
 

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the association between cardiovascular risk factors and the presence of diabetes in a large population-level dataset.

Methods

A secondary analysis was conducted using data from the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a population-based survey (n = 403,137) conducted in the United States.

Results

The majority of the respondents were middle-aged and overweight. Approximately half of the sample reported little or no physical activity. Estimates from a logistic regression model for a weighted sample of white, black, and Hispanic adults revealed that having hypertension or elevated cholesterol was a strong predictor of diabetes even when controlling for age, gender, race, education, income, body mass index, smoking status, and physical activity.

Conclusions

The results confirmed the importance of diabetes educators counseling patients with hypertension or hypercholesterolemia about their increased risk for developing diabetes.

 
 
 
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