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Articles by S. E Bojesen
Total Records ( 2 ) for S. E Bojesen
  J. S Johansen , S. E Bojesen , A Tybjaerg Hansen , A. K Mylin , P. A Price and B. G. Nordestgaard
  BACKGROUND:

Increased plasma YKL-40 is associated with short-term survival in patients with cardiovascular disease and cancer. We tested the hypothesis that increased plasma YKL-40 is associated with total and disease-specific mortality in the general population.

METHODS:

We measured plasma YKL-40 in 8899 study participants, aged 20–95 years, in the Copenhagen City Heart Study from the Danish general population who were followed for 16 years: 3059 died, 2158 had ischemic cardiovascular disease, 2271 had cancer, and 2820 had other diseases associated with increased YKL-40. Hazard ratios for early death and absolute 10-year mortality rates were calculated according to plasma YKL-40 percentile groupings computed within sex and age decade: 0%–33%, 34%–66%, 67%–90%, 91%–95%, and 96%–100%.

RESULTS:

Median survival age decreased from 83 years for participants with plasma YKL-40 in category 0%–33% to 69 years in category 96%–100% (trend, P < 0.0001). Risk of early death was increased (multifactorially adjusted hazard ratios) by 10% for YKL-40 category 34%–66%, by 30% for 67%–90%, by 70% for 91%–95%, and by 90% for 96%–100% vs YKL-40 category 0%–33% (trend, P < 0.0001). Corresponding increases in participants with ischemic cardiovascular disease were 10%, 20%, 80%, and 60% (P < 0.0001); in those with cancer were 10%, 20%, 50%, and 70% (P < 0.0001); and in those with other diseases were 10%, 20%, 40%, and 60% (P < 0.0001). Highest absolute 10-year mortality rates were 78% and 90% in women and men, respectively, who were >70 years old, smoked, and were in YKL-40 category 96%–100%.

CONCLUSIONS:

Increased plasma YKL-40 is associated with risk of early death from cardiovascular disease, cancer, and other diseases in the general population.

  R. L Milne , J Benitez , H Nevanlinna , T Heikkinen , K Aittomaki , C Blomqvist , J. I Arias , M. P Zamora , B Burwinkel , C. R Bartram , A Meindl , R. K Schmutzler , A Cox , I Brock , G Elliott , M. W. R Reed , M. C Southey , L Smith , A. B Spurdle , J. L Hopper , F. J Couch , J. E Olson , X Wang , Z Fredericksen , P Schurmann , M Bremer , P Hillemanns , T Dork , P Devilee , C. J van Asperen , R. A. E. M Tollenaar , C Seynaeve , P Hall , K Czene , J Liu , Y Li , S Ahmed , A. M Dunning , M Maranian , P. D. P Pharoah , G Chenevix Trench , J Beesley , kConFab Investigators , N. N Antonenkova , I. V Zalutsky , H Anton Culver , A Ziogas , H Brauch , C Justenhoven , Y. D Ko , S Haas , P. A Fasching , R Strick , A. B Ekici , M. W Beckmann , G. G Giles , G Severi , L Baglietto , D. R English , O Fletcher , N Johnson , I dos Santos Silva , J Peto , C Turnbull , S Hines , A Renwick , N Rahman , B. G Nordestgaard , S. E Bojesen , H Flyger , D Kang , K. Y Yoo , D. Y Noh , A Mannermaa , V Kataja , V. M Kosma , M Garcia Closas , S Chanock , J Lissowska , L. A Brinton , J Chang Claude , S Wang Gohrke , C. Y Shen , H. C Wang , J. C Yu , S. T Chen , M Bermisheva , T Nikolaeva , E Khusnutdinova , M. K Humphreys , J Morrison , R Platte , D. F Easton and on behalf of the Breast Cancer Association Consortium
  Background

A recent genome-wide association study identified single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) 2q35-rs13387042 as a marker of susceptibility to estrogen receptor (ER)–positive breast cancer. We attempted to confirm this association using the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.

Methods

2q35-rs13387042 SNP was genotyped for 31 510 women with invasive breast cancer, 1101 women with ductal carcinoma in situ, and 35 969 female control subjects from 25 studies. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated by logistic regression, adjusted for study. Heterogeneity in odds ratios by each of age, ethnicity, and study was assessed by fitting interaction terms. Heterogeneity by each of invasiveness, family history, bilaterality, and hormone receptor status was assessed by subclassifying case patients and applying polytomous logistic regression. All statistical tests were two-sided.

Results

We found strong evidence of association between rs13387042 and breast cancer in white women of European origin (per-allele OR = 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.09 to 1.15; Ptrend = 1.0 x 10–19). The odds ratio was lower than that previously reported (P = .02) and did not vary by age or ethnicity (all P ≥ .2). However, it was higher when the analysis was restricted to case patients who were selected for a strong family history (P = .02). An association was observed for both ER-positive (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.10 to 1.17; P = 10–15) and ER-negative disease (OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.15; P = .0003) and both progesterone receptor (PR)–positive (OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.11 to 1.19; P = 5 x 10–14) and PR-negative disease (OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.06 to 1.15; P = .00002).

Conclusion

The rs13387042 is associated with both ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancer in European women.

 
 
 
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