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Articles by S. C Chang
Total Records ( 5 ) for S. C Chang
  S. L Park , D Bastani , B. Y Goldstein , S. C Chang , W Cozen , L Cai , C Cordon Cardo , B Ding , S Greenland , N He , S. K Hussain , Q Jiang , Y. C. A Lee , S Liu , M. L Lu , T. M Mack , J. T Mao , H Morgenstern , L. N Mu , S. S Oh , A Pantuck , J. C Papp , J Rao , V. E Reuter , D. P Tashkin , H Wang , N. C. Y You , S. Z Yu , J. K Zhao and Z. F. Zhang
 

Constituents of tobacco smoke can cause DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), leading to tumorigenesis. The NBS1 gene product is a vital component in DSB detection and repair, thus genetic variations may influence cancer development. We examined the associations between NBS1 polymorphisms and haplotypes and newly incident smoking-related cancers in three case–control studies (Los Angeles: 611 lung and 601 upper aero-digestive tract (UADT) cancer cases and 1040 controls; Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center: 227 bladder cancer cases and 211 controls and Taixing, China: 218 esophagus, 206 stomach, 204 liver cancer cases and 415 controls). rs1061302 was associated with cancers of the lung [adjusted odds ratio (ORadj) = 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2, 2.4], larynx (ORadj = 0.56, 95% CI: 0.32, 0.97) and liver (ORadj = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.0, 2.9). Additionally, positive associations were found for rs709816 with bladder cancer (ORadj = 4.2, 95% CI: 1.4, 12) and rs1063054 with lung cancer (ORadj = 1.6, 95% CI: 1.0, 2.3). Some associations in lung and stomach cancers varied with smoking status. CAC haplotype was positively associated with smoking-related cancers: lung (ORadj = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.1, 2.9) and UADT (ORadj = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.1, 3.7), specifically, oropharynx (ORadj = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.0, 4.2) and larynx (ORadj = 4.8, 95% CI: 1.7, 14). Bayesian false-discovery probabilities were calculated to assess Type I error. It appears that NBS1 polymorphisms and haplotypes may be associated with smoking-related cancers and that these associations may differ by smoking status. Our findings also suggest that single-nucleotide polymorphisms located in the binding region of the MRE-RAD50-NBS1 complex or microRNA targeted pathways may influence tumor development. These hypotheses should be further examined in functional studies.

  T Truong , R. J Hung , C. I Amos , X Wu , H Bickeboller , A Rosenberger , W Sauter , T Illig , H. E Wichmann , A Risch , H Dienemann , R Kaaks , P Yang , R Jiang , J. K Wiencke , M Wrensch , H Hansen , K. T Kelsey , K Matsuo , K Tajima , A. G Schwartz , A Wenzlaff , A Seow , C Ying , A Staratschek Jox , P Nurnberg , E Stoelben , J Wolf , P Lazarus , J. E Muscat , C. J Gallagher , S Zienolddiny , A Haugen , H. F. M van der Heijden , L. A Kiemeney , D Isla , J. I Mayordomo , T Rafnar , K Stefansson , Z. F Zhang , S. C Chang , J. H Kim , Y. C Hong , E. J Duell , A. S Andrew , F Lejbkowicz , G Rennert , H Muller , H Brenner , L Le Marchand , S Benhamou , C Bouchardy , M. D Teare , X Xue , J McLaughlin , G Liu , J. D McKay , P Brennan and M. R. Spitz
  Background

Genome-wide association studies have identified three chromosomal regions at 15q25, 5p15, and 6p21 as being associated with the risk of lung cancer. To confirm these associations in independent studies and investigate heterogeneity of these associations within specific subgroups, we conducted a coordinated genotyping study within the International Lung Cancer Consortium based on independent studies that were not included in previous genome-wide association studies.

Methods

Genotype data for single-nucleotide polymorphisms at chromosomes 15q25 (rs16969968, rs8034191), 5p15 (rs2736100, rs402710), and 6p21 (rs2256543, rs4324798) from 21 case–control studies for 11 645 lung cancer case patients and 14 954 control subjects, of whom 85% were white and 15% were Asian, were pooled. Associations between the variants and the risk of lung cancer were estimated by logistic regression models. All statistical tests were two-sided.

Results

Associations between 15q25 and the risk of lung cancer were replicated in white ever-smokers (rs16969968: odds ratio [OR] = 1.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.21 to 1.32, Ptrend = 2 x 10–26), and this association was stronger for those diagnosed at younger ages. There was no association in never-smokers or in Asians between either of the 15q25 variants and the risk of lung cancer. For the chromosome 5p15 region, we confirmed statistically significant associations in whites for both rs2736100 (OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.10 to 1.20, Ptrend = 1 x 10–10) and rs402710 (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.09 to 1.19, Ptrend = 5 x 10–8) and identified similar associations in Asians (rs2736100: OR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.12 to 1.35, Ptrend = 2 x 10–5; rs402710: OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.27, Ptrend = .007). The associations between the 5p15 variants and lung cancer differed by histology; odds ratios for rs2736100 were highest in adenocarcinoma and for rs402710 were highest in adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinomas. This pattern was observed in both ethnic groups. Neither of the two variants on chromosome 6p21 was associated with the risk of lung cancer.

Conclusions

In this international genetic association study of lung cancer, previous associations found in white populations were replicated and new associations were identified in Asian populations. Future genetic studies of lung cancer should include detailed stratification by histology.

  J. E Foreman , S. C Chang , D. J Ehresman , J. L Butenhoff , C. R Anderson , P. S Palkar , B. H Kang , F. J Gonzalez and J. M. Peters
 

Perfluorobutryate (PFBA) is a short chain perfluoroalkyl carboxylate that is structurally similar to perfluorooctanoate. Administration of PFBA can cause peroxisome proliferation, induction of peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation and hepatomegaly, suggesting that PFBA activates the nuclear receptor, peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor- (PPAR-). In this study, the role of PPAR- in mediating the effects of PFBA was examined using PPAR- null mice and a mouse line expressing the human PPAR- in the absence of mouse PPAR- (PPAR- humanized mice). PFBA caused upregulation of known PPAR- target genes that modulate lipid metabolism in wild-type and PPAR- humanized mice, and this effect was not found in PPAR- null mice. Increased liver weight and hepatocyte hypertrophy were also found in wild-type and humanized PPAR- mice treated with PFBA, but not in PPAR- null mice. Interestingly, hepatocyte focal necrosis with inflammatory cell infiltrate was only found in wild-type mice administered PFBA; this effect was markedly diminished in both PPAR- null and PPAR- humanized mice. Results from these studies demonstrate that PFBA can modulate gene expression and cause mild hepatomegaly and hepatocyte hypertrophy through a mechanism that requires PPAR- and that these effects do not exhibit a species difference. In contrast, the PPAR-–dependent increase in PFBA-induced hepatocyte focal necrosis with inflammatory cell infiltrate was mediated by the mouse PPAR- but not the human PPAR-. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that PFBA can activate both the mouse and human PPAR-, but there is a species difference in the hepatotoxic response to this chemical.

 
 
 
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