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Articles by S Yang
Total Records ( 6 ) for S Yang
  X Yang , S Yang , C McKimmey , B Liu , S. M Edgerton , W Bales , L. T Archer and A. D. Thor
 

Genistein is a major isoflavone with known hormonal and tyrosine kinase-modulating activities. Genistein has been shown to promote the growth of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) MCF-7 cells. In ER-negative (ER–)/erbB-2-overexpressing (erbB-2+) cells, genistein has been shown to inhibit cell growth through its tyrosine kinase inhibitor activity. The effects of genistein on cell growth and tamoxifen response in ER+/erbB-2-altered breast cancers (known as luminal type B and noted in ~10 to 20% of breast cancers) have not been well explored. Using erbB-2-transfected ER+ MCF-7 cells, we found that genistein induced enhanced cellular proliferation and tamoxifen resistance when compared with control MCF-7 cells. These responses were accompanied by increased phosphorylation of ER and ER signaling, without increase in ER protein levels. Genistein-treated MCF-7/erbB-2 cells also showed enhanced activation/phosphorylation of erbB-2, Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Blockade of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and/or MAPK pathways abrogated genistein-induced growth promotion, suggesting that genistein effects involve both critical signaling pathways. We also found that p27/kip1 was markedly downregulated in genistein-treated MCF-7/erbB-2 cells. Overexpression of p27/kip1 attenuated genistein-mediated growth promotion. In aggregate, our data suggest that the concomitant coexpression of ER and erbB-2 makes breast cancers particularly susceptible to the growth-promoting effects of genistein across a wide range of doses. The underlying mechanisms involve enhanced ER–erbB-2 cross talk and p27/kip1 downregulation.

  K. J McKernan , H. E Peckham , G. L Costa , S. F McLaughlin , Y Fu , E. F Tsung , C. R Clouser , C Duncan , J. K Ichikawa , C. C Lee , Z Zhang , S. S Ranade , E. T Dimalanta , F. C Hyland , T. D Sokolsky , L Zhang , A Sheridan , H Fu , C. L Hendrickson , B Li , L Kotler , J. R Stuart , J. A Malek , J. M Manning , A. A Antipova , D. S Perez , M. P Moore , K. C Hayashibara , M. R Lyons , R. E Beaudoin , B. E Coleman , M. W Laptewicz , A. E Sannicandro , M. D Rhodes , R. K Gottimukkala , S Yang , V Bafna , A Bashir , A MacBride , C Alkan , J. M Kidd , E. E Eichler , M. G Reese , F. M De La Vega and A. P. Blanchard
 

We describe the genome sequencing of an anonymous individual of African origin using a novel ligation-based sequencing assay that enables a unique form of error correction that improves the raw accuracy of the aligned reads to >99.9%, allowing us to accurately call SNPs with as few as two reads per allele. We collected several billion mate-paired reads yielding ~18x haploid coverage of aligned sequence and close to 300x clone coverage. Over 98% of the reference genome is covered with at least one uniquely placed read, and 99.65% is spanned by at least one uniquely placed mate-paired clone. We identify over 3.8 million SNPs, 19% of which are novel. Mate-paired data are used to physically resolve haplotype phases of nearly two-thirds of the genotypes obtained and produce phased segments of up to 215 kb. We detect 226,529 intra-read indels, 5590 indels between mate-paired reads, 91 inversions, and four gene fusions. We use a novel approach for detecting indels between mate-paired reads that are smaller than the standard deviation of the insert size of the library and discover deletions in common with those detected with our intra-read approach. Dozens of mutations previously described in OMIM and hundreds of nonsynonymous single-nucleotide and structural variants in genes previously implicated in disease are identified in this individual. There is more genetic variation in the human genome still to be uncovered, and we provide guidance for future surveys in populations and cancer biopsies.

  Temple The MGC Project Team , D. S Gerhard , R Rasooly , E. A Feingold , P. J Good , C Robinson , A Mandich , J. G Derge , J Lewis , D Shoaf , F. S Collins , W Jang , L Wagner , C. M Shenmen , L Misquitta , C. F Schaefer , K. H Buetow , T. I Bonner , L Yankie , M Ward , L Phan , A Astashyn , G Brown , C Farrell , J Hart , M Landrum , B. L Maidak , M Murphy , T Murphy , B Rajput , L Riddick , D Webb , J Weber , W Wu , K. D Pruitt , D Maglott , A Siepel , B Brejova , M Diekhans , R Harte , R Baertsch , J Kent , D Haussler , M Brent , L Langton , C. L.G Comstock , M Stevens , C Wei , M. J van Baren , K Salehi Ashtiani , R. R Murray , L Ghamsari , E Mello , C Lin , C Pennacchio , K Schreiber , N Shapiro , A Marsh , E Pardes , T Moore , A Lebeau , M Muratet , B Simmons , D Kloske , S Sieja , J Hudson , P Sethupathy , M Brownstein , N Bhat , J Lazar , H Jacob , C. E Gruber , M. R Smith , J McPherson , A. M Garcia , P. H Gunaratne , J Wu , D Muzny , R. A Gibbs , A. C Young , G. G Bouffard , R. W Blakesley , J Mullikin , E. D Green , M. C Dickson , A. C Rodriguez , J Grimwood , J Schmutz , R. M Myers , M Hirst , T Zeng , K Tse , M Moksa , M Deng , K Ma , D Mah , J Pang , G Taylor , E Chuah , A Deng , K Fichter , A Go , S Lee , J Wang , M Griffith , R Morin , R. A Moore , M Mayo , S Munro , S Wagner , S. J.M Jones , R. A Holt , M. A Marra , S Lu , S Yang , J Hartigan , M Graf , R Wagner , S Letovksy , J. C Pulido , K Robison , D Esposito , J Hartley , V. E Wall , R. F Hopkins , O Ohara and S. Wiemann
 

Since its start, the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC) has sought to provide at least one full-protein-coding sequence cDNA clone for every human and mouse gene with a RefSeq transcript, and at least 6200 rat genes. The MGC cloning effort initially relied on random expressed sequence tag screening of cDNA libraries. Here, we summarize our recent progress using directed RT-PCR cloning and DNA synthesis. The MGC now contains clones with the entire protein-coding sequence for 92% of human and 89% of mouse genes with curated RefSeq (NM-accession) transcripts, and for 97% of human and 96% of mouse genes with curated RefSeq transcripts that have one or more PubMed publications, in addition to clones for more than 6300 rat genes. These high-quality MGC clones and their sequences are accessible without restriction to researchers worldwide.

  M Liao , X Chen , J Han , S Yang , T Peng and H. Li
 

Huntingtin-associated protein-1 (HAP1) was initially identified as a binding partner of huntingtin, the Huntington's disease protein. Based on its preferred distribution among neurons and endocrine cells, HAP1 has been suggested to play roles in vesicular transportation in neurons and hormonal secretion of endocrine cells. Given that HAP1 is selectively expressed in the islets of rat pancreas, in this study, we analyzed the expression pattern of HAP1 in the islets. In rats injected intraperitoneally with streptozotocin, which can selectively destroy β-cells of the pancreatic islets, the number of HAP1 immunoreactive cells was dramatically decreased and was accompanied by a parallel decrease in the number of insulin-immunoreactive cells. Immunofluorescent double staining of pancreas sections showed that, in rat islets, HAP1 is selectively expressed in the insulin-immunoreactive β-cells but not in the glucagon-immunoreactive -cells and somatostatin immunoreactive -cells. In isolated rat pancreatic islets, ~80% of cells expressed both HAP1 and insulin. Expression of HAP1 in the INS-1 rat insulinoma cell line was also demonstrated by immunofluorescent staining. Western blotting further revealed that HAP1 in both the isolated rat pancreatic islets and the INS-1 cells also has two isoforms, HAP1A and HAP1B, which are the same as those in the hypothalamus. These results demonstrated that HAP1 is selectively expressed in β-cells of rat pancreatic islets, suggesting the involvement of HAP1 in the regulation of cellular trafficking and secretion of insulin. (J Histochem Cytochem 58:255–263, 2010)

  M Jiang , Y Ma , C Chen , X Fu , S Yang , X Li , G Yu , Y Mao , Y Xie and Y. Li
 

Androgen signaling plays an important role in many biological processes. Androgen Responsive Gene Database (ARGDB) is devoted to providing integrated knowledge on androgen-controlled genes. Gene records were collected on the basis of PubMed literature collections. More than 6000 abstracts and 950 original publications were manually screened, leading to 1785 human genes, 993 mouse genes, and 583 rat genes finally included in the database. All the collected genes were experimentally proved to be regulated by androgen at the expression level or to contain androgen-responsive regions. For each gene important details of the androgen regulation experiments were collected from references, such as expression change, androgen-responsive sequence, response time, tissue/cell type, experimental method, ligand identity, and androgen amount, which will facilitate further evaluation by researchers. Furthermore, the database was integrated with multiple annotation resources, including National Center for Biotechnology Information, Gene Ontology, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway, to reveal the biological characteristics and significance of androgen-regulated genes. The ARGDB web site is mainly composed of the Browse, Search, Element Scan, and Submission modules. It is user friendly and freely accessible at http://argdb.fudan.edu.cn. Preliminary analysis of the collected data was performed. Many disease pathways, such as prostate carcinogenesis, were found to be enriched in androgen-regulated genes. The discovered androgen-response motifs were similar to those in previous reports. The analysis results are displayed in the web site. In conclusion, ARGDB provides a unified gateway to storage, retrieval, and update of information on androgen-regulated genes.

  S Yang , B Vanderbeld , J Wan and Y. Huang
 

Drought is the most important environmental stress affecting agriculture worldwide. Exploiting yield potential and maintaining yield stability of crops in water-limited environments are urgent tasks that must be undertaken in order to guarantee food supply for the increasing world population. Tremendous efforts have been devoted to identifying key regulators in plant drought response through genetic, molecular, and biochemical studies using, in most cases, the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. However, only a small portion of these regulators have been explored as potential candidate genes for their application in the improvement of drought tolerance in crops. Based on biological functions, these genes can be classified into the following three categories: (1) stress-responsive transcriptional regulation (e.g. DREB1, AREB, NF-YB); (2) post-transcriptional RNA or protein modifications such as phosphorylation/dephosphorylation (e.g. SnRK2, ABI1) and farnesylation (e.g. ERA1); and (3) osomoprotectant metabolism or molecular chaperones (e.g. CspB). While continuing down the path to discovery of new target genes, serious efforts are also focused on fine-tuning the expression of the known candidate genes for stress tolerance in specific temporal and spatial patterns to avoid negative effects in plant growth and development. These efforts are starting to bear fruit by showing yield improvements in several crops under a variety of water-deprivation conditions. As most such evaluations have been performed under controlled growth environments, a gap still remains between early success in the laboratory and the application of these techniques to the elite cultivars of staple crops in the field. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made in the identification of signaling pathways and master regulators for drought tolerance. The knowledge acquired will facilitate the genetic engineering of single or multiple targets and quantitative trait loci in key crops to create commercial-grade cultivars with high-yielding potential under both optimal and suboptimal conditions.

 
 
 
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