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Articles by S Okayama
Total Records ( 3 ) for S Okayama
  K Onoue , S Uemura , Y Takeda , S Somekawa , H Iwama , K Imagawa , T Nishida , Y Morikawa , Y Takemoto , O Asai , T Soeda , S Okayama , K Ishigami , K Nakatani , H Kawata , M Horii , T Nakajima , Y Akai , M Iwano and Y. Saito
 

Background— Renal dysfunction is commonly accompanied by a worsening of atherosclerosis; however, the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood. We examined the role played by soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1), an endogenous antagonist of the proatherogenic cytokine placental growth factor (PlGF), in the worsening of atherosclerosis in patients with renal dysfunction and in an animal model of renal failure.

Methods and Results— In this study, 329 patients who received cardiac catheterization and 76 patients who underwent renal biopsy were enrolled. Both plasma sFlt-1 levels and renal sFlt-1 mRNA expression were positively correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (P<0.01). The PlGF/sFlt-1 ratio was negatively correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (P<0.01), whereas plasma PlGF levels were not affected by it. The PlGF/sFlt-1 ratio was significantly higher in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease than in patients with single-vessel or no coronary artery disease. The reduction of circulating sFlt-1 and renal sFlt-1 mRNA levels was confirmed in five-sixths (5/6)–nephrectomized apolipoprotein E–deficient mice that developed experimental renal dysfunction. Atherosclerotic plaque area and macrophage infiltration into the plaque were significantly higher in 5/6–nephrectomized apolipoprotein E–deficient mice than in control mice, but replacement therapy with recombinant sFlt-1 significantly reduced both plaque formation and macrophage infiltration.

Conclusions— The present study demonstrates that a reduction in the circulating levels of sFlt-1 is associated with the worsening of atherosclerosis that accompanies renal dysfunction.

  S Somekawa , K Imagawa , N Naya , Y Takemoto , K Onoue , S Okayama , Y Takeda , H Kawata , M Horii , T Nakajima , S Uemura , N Mochizuki and Y. Saito
 

Aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) and 11β-hydroxylase (CYP11B1) regulate aldosterone and cortisol production, respectively. The expression of these enzymes is promoted by calcium influx through Cav3.2, a T-type calcium channel. Neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF) binds to neuron-restrictive silencer element (NRSE) to suppress the transcription of NRSE-containing genes. We found a NRSE-like sequence in human CYP11B2 and CYP11B1 genes as well as the CACNA1H gene of many mammalian species. The CACNA1H gene encodes the -subunit of Cav3.2. Here we investigated how NRSF/NRSE regulates aldosterone and cortisol synthesis. Inhibition of endogenous NRSF by an adenovirus-expressing dominant-negative NRSF (AD/dnNRSF) increased human CYP11B2 and CYP11B1 mRNA expression, leading to aldosterone and cortisol secretion in human adrenocortical (H295R) cells. In reporter gene experiments, NRSE suppressed luciferase reporters driven by CYP11B2 and CYP11B1 promoters and dnNRSF enhanced them. Moreover, cotransfection of dnNRSF increased luciferase activity of reporter genes after deletion or mutation of NRSE, suggesting that NRSF/NRSE regulates transcription of CYP11B2 and CYP11B1 genes indirectly. AD/dnNRSF augmented mRNA expression of rat CYP11B2 and CYP11B1 genes, neither of which contains a NRSE-like sequence in rat adrenal cells. AD/dnNRSE also significantly increased CACNA1H mRNA in H295R and rat adrenal cells. Efonidipine, a T/L-type calcium channel blocker, significantly suppressed dnNRSF-mediated up-regulation of CYP11B2 and CYP11B1 expression. Moreover, NRSF/NRSE is also involved in angiotensin II- and K+-stimulated augmentation of CYP11B2 and CYP11B1 gene transcription. In conclusion, NRSF/NRSE controls aldosterone and cortisol synthesis by regulating CYP11B2 and CYP11B1 gene transcription mainly through NRSF/NRSE-mediated enhancement of the CACNA1H gene.

  K Tamura , S Okayama and R. Shimizu
 

New multistage self-aligned quadrupole correction-lens systems are proposed for correcting the spherical aberration of a rotationally symmetrical lens in a probe-forming system such as electron beam lithography and focused ion beam. These multistage correction-lens systems consist of six- or eight-stage electrostatic quadrupole and aperture electrodes placed between the quadrupoles. An octupole field for the correction of aperture aberration is automatically created and aligned with a quadrupole field by supplying a voltage to the aperture electrode. The optical properties of the self-aligned quadrupole correction-lens systems are precisely simulated using the potential functions approximated from the calculated three-dimensional potential distributions. The lens components of the correction-lens systems are symmetric with respect to the mid-plane of the correction system, and the quadrupole excitations are anti-symmetric to the mid-plane. The simulated optical properties of the six- and eight-stage self-aligned quadrupole correction-lens systems are compared with a four-stage self-aligned quadrupole correction-lens system. Aperture aberration coefficients of the six- or eight-stage quadrupole system under non-excitation of the aperture electrodes become much smaller than those of the four-stage quadrupole system. It is found that the correction of spherical aberration using the six- or eight-stage self-aligned quadrupole correction-lens system can be easily achieved under the condition of considerably lower excitation of lens elements in comparison to the four-stage self-aligned quadrupole correction-lens system.

 
 
 
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