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Articles by S Ogawa
Total Records ( 4 ) for S Ogawa
  J Kato , Y Ogawa , W Kojima , K Aoki , S Ogawa and K. Iwasaki
  Background

The low and moderate doses of dexmedetomidine reduce arterial pressure and heart rate (HR), suggesting attenuation of sympathetic activity and dominance of cardiac-vagal activity. These autonomic responses under dexmedetomidine sedation may attenuate cardiovascular reflex responses to temporal reduction in arterial pressure, inducing a severe hypotension. We therefore investigated the effects of dexmedetomidine on cardiovascular reflex responses to temporal reduction in arterial pressure induced by the thigh cuff method.

Methods

Twelve healthy men received placebo, low-dose (loading 3 µg kg–1 h–1 for 10 min; maintenance 0.2 µg kg–1 h–1 for 60 min), and moderate-dose (loading 6 µg kg–1 h–1 for 10 min; maintenance 0.4 µg kg–1 h–1 for 60 min) dexmedetomidine infusions in a randomized, double-blind, crossover study. After 70 min of drug infusion, systolic arterial pressure (SAP) and HR responses after thigh cuff deflation were evaluated as indices of cardiovascular reflex.

Results

Reduction in SAP (SAP) [placebo 8 (4), low 12 (4), moderate 19 (5) mm Hg] after thigh cuff deflation was significantly greater in dexmedetomidine than placebo infusions, in a dose-dependent manner. The change in HR (HR), HR/SAP, and the percentage restoration of SAP were lower with dexmedetomidine compared with placebo.

Conclusions

The present results indicated that dexmedetomidine weakens arterial pressure preservation and HR responses after thigh cuff deflation, suggesting attenuated cardiovascular reflexes. Therefore, it must be cautioned that dexmedetomidine can lead to further and sustained reduction in arterial pressure during transient hypotension induced by postural changes, haemorrhage, and/or other stresses.

  J Endo , M Sano , T Katayama , T Hishiki , K Shinmura , S Morizane , T Matsuhashi , Y Katsumata , Y Zhang , H Ito , Y Nagahata , S Marchitti , K Nishimaki , A. M Wolf , H Nakanishi , F Hattori , V Vasiliou , T Adachi , I Ohsawa , R Taguchi , Y Hirabayashi , S Ohta , M Suematsu , S Ogawa and K. Fukuda
 

Rationale: Aldehyde accumulation is regarded as a pathognomonic feature of oxidative stress–associated cardiovascular disease.

Objective: We investigated how the heart compensates for the accelerated accumulation of aldehydes.

Methods and Results: Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) has a major role in aldehyde detoxification in the mitochondria, a major source of aldehydes. Transgenic (Tg) mice carrying an Aldh2 gene with a single nucleotide polymorphism (Aldh2*2) were developed. This polymorphism has a dominant-negative effect and the Tg mice exhibited impaired ALDH activity against a broad range of aldehydes. Despite a shift toward the oxidative state in mitochondrial matrices, Aldh2*2 Tg hearts displayed normal left ventricular function by echocardiography and, because of metabolic remodeling, an unexpected tolerance to oxidative stress induced by ischemia/reperfusion injury. Mitochondrial aldehyde stress stimulated eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 phosphorylation. Subsequent translational and transcriptional activation of activating transcription factor-4 promoted the expression of enzymes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and transport, ultimately providing precursor amino acids for glutathione biosynthesis. Intracellular glutathione levels were increased 1.37-fold in Aldh2*2 Tg hearts compared with wild-type controls. Heterozygous knockout of Atf4 blunted the increase in intracellular glutathione levels in Aldh2*2 Tg hearts, thereby attenuating the oxidative stress–resistant phenotype. Furthermore, glycolysis and NADPH generation via the pentose phosphate pathway were activated in Aldh2*2 Tg hearts. (NADPH is required for the recycling of oxidized glutathione.)

Conclusions: The findings of the present study indicate that mitochondrial aldehyde stress in the heart induces metabolic remodeling, leading to activation of the glutathione–redox cycle, which confers resistance against acute oxidative stress induced by ischemia/reperfusion.

  S Yuasa , T Onizuka , K Shimoji , Y Ohno , T Kageyama , S. H Yoon , T Egashira , T Seki , H Hashimoto , T Nishiyama , R Kaneda , M Murata , F Hattori , S Makino , M Sano , S Ogawa , O. W. J Prall , R. P Harvey and K. Fukuda
 

Rationale: The transcriptional networks guiding heart development remain poorly understood, despite the identification of several essential cardiac transcription factors.

Objective: To isolate novel cardiac transcription factors, we performed gene chip analysis and found that Zac1, a zinc finger-type transcription factor, was strongly expressed in the developing heart. This study was designed to investigate the molecular and functional role of Zac1 as a cardiac transcription factor.

Methods and Results: Zac1 was strongly expressed in the heart from cardiac crescent stages and in the looping heart showed a chamber-restricted pattern. Zac1 stimulated luciferase reporter constructs driven by ANF, BNP, or MHC promoters. Strong functional synergy was seen between Zac1 and Nkx2-5 on the ANF promoter, which carries adjacent Zac1 and Nkx2-5 DNA-binding sites. Zac1 directly associated with the ANF promoter in vitro and in vivo, and Zac1 and Nkx2-5 physically associated through zinc fingers 5 and 6 in Zac1, and the homeodomain in Nkx2-5. Zac1 is a maternally imprinted gene and is the first such gene found to be involved in heart development. Homozygous and paternally derived heterozygous mice carrying an interruption in the Zac1 locus showed decreased levels of chamber and myofilament genes, increased apoptotic cells, partially penetrant lethality and morphological defects including atrial and ventricular septal defects, and thin ventricular walls.

Conclusions: Zac1 plays an essential role in the cardiac gene regulatory network. Our data provide a potential mechanistic link between Zac1 in cardiogenesis and congenital heart disease manifestations associated with genetic or epigenetic defects in an imprinted gene network.

  S Kamakura , T Ohe , K Nakazawa , Y Aizawa , A Shimizu , M Horie , S Ogawa , K Okumura , K Tsuchihashi , K Sugi , N Makita , N Hagiwara , H Inoue , H Atarashi , N Aihara , W Shimizu , T Kurita , K Suyama , T Noda , K Satomi , H Okamura , H Tomoike and for the Brugada Syndrome Investigators in Japan
 

Background— The prognosis of patients with saddleback or noncoved type (non–type 1) ST-elevation in Brugada syndrome is unknown. The purpose of this study was to clarify the long-term prognosis of probands with non–type 1 ECG and those with coved (type 1) Brugada-pattern ECG.

Methods and Results— A total of 330 (123 symptomatic, 207 asymptomatic) probands with a coved or saddleback ST-elevation ≥1 mm in leads V1–V3 were divided into 2 ECG groups—type 1 (245 probands) and non–type 1 (85 probands)—and were prospectively followed for 48.7±15.0 months. The absence of type 1 ECG was confirmed by drug provocation test and multiple recordings. The ratio of individuals with a family history of sudden cardiac death (14%) was lower than previous studies. Clinical profiles and outcomes were not notably different between the 2 groups (annual arrhythmic event rate of probands with ventricular fibrillation; type 1: 10.2%, non–type 1: 10.6%, probands with syncope; type 1: 0.6%, non–type 1: 1.2%, and asymptomatic probands; type 1: 0.5%, non–type 1: 0%). Family history of sudden cardiac death at age <45 years and coexistence of inferolateral early repolarization with Brugada-pattern ECG were independent predictors of fatal arrhythmic events (hazard ratio, 3.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.42 to 7.60; P=0.005; hazard ratio, 2.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.06 to 6.71; P=0.03, respectively, by multivariate analysis), although spontaneous type 1 ECG and ventricular fibrillation inducibility by electrophysiological study were not reliable parameters.

Conclusions— The long-term prognosis of probands in non–type 1 group was similar to that of type 1 group. Family history of sudden cardiac death and the presence of early repolarization were predictors of poor outcome in this study, which included only probands with Brugada-pattern ST-elevation.

 
 
 
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