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Articles by S Ma
Total Records ( 3 ) for S Ma
  J Huang , S Ma , H Xie and C. H. Zhang
 

In multiple regression problems when covariates can be naturally grouped, it is important to carry out feature selection at the group and within-group individual variable levels simultaneously. The existing methods, including the lasso and group lasso, are designed for either variable selection or group selection, but not for both. We propose a group bridge approach that is capable of simultaneous selection at both the group and within-group individual variable levels. The proposed approach is a penalized regularization method that uses a specially designed group bridge penalty. It has the oracle group selection property, in that it can correctly select important groups with probability converging to one. In contrast, the group lasso and group least angle regression methods in general do not possess such an oracle property in group selection. Simulation studies indicate that the group bridge has superior performance in group and individual variable selection relative to several existing methods.

  Y Sun , S Ma , J Zhou , A. K Yamoah , J. Q Feng , R. J Hinton and C. Qin
 

The small integrin-binding ligand, N-linked glycoprotein (SIBLING) family is closely related to osteogenesis. Until recently, little was known about their existence in articular cartilage. In this study, we systematically evaluated the presence and distribution of four SIBLING family members in rat femoral head cartilage: dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1), bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteopontin (OPN), and dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP). First, non-collagenous proteins were extracted and then separated by ion-exchange chromatography. Next, the protein extracts eluted by chromatography were analyzed by Stains-all staining and Western immunoblotting. IHC was used to assess the distribution of these four SIBLING family members in the femoral head cartilage. Both approaches showed that all the four SIBLING family members are expressed in the femoral head cartilage. IHC showed that SIBLING members are distributed in various locations throughout the articular cartilage. The NH2-terminal fragments of DMP1, BSP, and OPN are present in the cells and in the extracellular matrix, whereas the COOH-terminal fragment of DMP1 and the NH2-terminal fragment of DSPP are primarily intracellularly localized in the chondrocytes. The presence of the SIBLING family members in the rat femoral head cartilage suggests that they may play important roles in chondrogenesis. (J Histochem Cytochem 58:1033–1043, 2010)

  S Ma , F. E Olucha Bordonau , M. A Hossain , F Lin , C Kuei , C Liu , J. D Wade , S. W Sutton , A Nunez and A. L. Gundlach
 

Hippocampal theta rhythm is thought to underlie learning and memory, and it is well established that "pacemaker" neurons in medial septum (MS) modulate theta activity. Recent studies in the rat demonstrated that brainstem-generated theta rhythm occurs through a multisynaptic pathway via the nucleus incertus (NI), which is the primary source of the neuropeptide relaxin-3 (RLN3). Therefore, this study examined the possible contribution of RLN3 to MS activity, and associated hippocampal theta activity and spatial memory. In anesthetized and conscious rats, we identified the ability of intraseptal RLN3 signaling to modulate neuronal activity in the MS and hippocampus and promote hippocampal theta rhythm. Behavioral studies in a spontaneous alternation task indicated that endogenous RLN3 signaling within MS promoted spatial memory and exploratory activity significantly increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in RLN3-producing NI neurons. Anatomical studies demonstrated axons/terminals from NI/RLN3 neurons make close contact with septal GABAergic (and cholinergic) neurons, including those that project to the hippocampus. In summary, RLN3 neurons of the NI can modulate spatial memory and underlying hippocampal theta activity through axonal projections to pacemaker neurons of the MS. NI/RLN3 neurons are highly responsive to stress and express corticotropin-releasing factor type-1 receptors, suggesting that the effects observed could be an important component of memory processing associated with stress responses.

 
 
 
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