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Articles by S Komazaki
Total Records ( 2 ) for S Komazaki
  D Yamazaki , S Komazaki , H Nakanishi , A Mishima , M Nishi , M Yazawa , T Yamazaki , R Taguchi and H. Takeshima
  Daiju Yamazaki, Shinji Komazaki, Hiroki Nakanishi, Aya Mishima, Miyuki Nishi, Masayuki Yazawa, Tetsuo Yamazaki, Ryo Taguchi, and Hiroshi Takeshima

TRIC channels function as monovalent cation-specific channels that mediate counter ion movements coupled with ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca2+ release from intracellular stores in muscle cells. Mammalian tissues differentially contain two TRIC channel subtypes: TRIC-A is abundantly expressed in excitable cells, whereas TRIC-B is ubiquitously expressed throughout tissues. Here, we report the physiological role of TRIC-B channels in mouse perinatal development. TRIC-B-knockout neonates were cyanotic owing to respiratory failure and died shortly after birth. In the mutant neonates, the deflated lungs exhibited severe histological defects, and alveolar type II epithelial cells displayed ultrastructural abnormalities. The metabolic conversion of glycogen into phospholipids was severely interrupted in the mutant type II cells, and surfactant phospholipids secreted into the alveolar space were insufficient in the mutant neonates. Moreover, the mutant type II cells were compromised for Ca2+ release mediated by inositol-trisphosphate receptors, despite Ca2+ overloading in intracellular stores. Our results indicate that TRIC-B channels take an active part in Ca2+ signalling to establish specialised functions in type II cells and are thus...

  C Cai , N Weisleder , J. K Ko , S Komazaki , Y Sunada , M Nishi , H Takeshima and J. Ma
 

Defective membrane repair can contribute to the progression of muscular dystrophy. Although mutations in caveolin-3 (Cav3) and dysferlin are linked to muscular dystrophy in human patients, the molecular mechanism underlying the functional interplay between Cav3 and dysferlin in membrane repair of muscle physiology and disease has not been fully resolved. We recently discovered that mitsugumin 53 (MG53), a muscle-specific TRIM (Tri-partite motif) family protein (TRIM72), contributes to intracellular vesicle trafficking and is an essential component of the membrane repair machinery in striated muscle. Here we show that MG53 interacts with dysferlin and Cav3 to regulate membrane repair in skeletal muscle. MG53 mediates active trafficking of intracellular vesicles to the sarcolemma and is required for movement of dysferlin to sites of cell injury during repair patch formation. Mutations in Cav3 (P104L, R26Q) that cause retention of Cav3 in Golgi apparatus result in aberrant localization of MG53 and dysferlin in a dominant-negative fashion, leading to defective membrane repair. Our data reveal that a molecular complex formed by MG53, dysferlin, and Cav3 is essential for repair of muscle membrane damage and also provide a therapeutic target for treatment of muscular and cardiovascular diseases that are linked to compromised membrane repair.

 
 
 
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