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Articles by S Kataoka
Total Records ( 1 ) for S Kataoka
  M Schoenbaum , B Butler , S Kataoka , G Norquist , B Springgate , G Sullivan , N Duan , R. C Kessler and K. Wells
 

Context  Concerns about mental health recovery persist after the 2005 Gulf storms. We propose a recovery model and estimate costs and outcomes.

Objective  To estimate the costs and outcomes of enhanced mental health response to large-scale disasters using the 2005 Gulf storms as a case study.

Design  Decision analysis using state-transition Markov models for 6-month periods from 7 to 30 months after disasters. Simulated movements between health states were based on probabilities drawn from the clinical literature and expert input.

Setting  A total of 117 counties/parishes across Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Texas that the Federal Emergency Management Agency designated as eligible for individual relief following hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

Participants  Hypothetical cohort, based on the size and characteristics of the population affected by the Gulf storms.

Intervention  Enhanced mental health care consisting of evidence-based screening, assessment, treatment, and care coordination.

Main Outcome Measures  Morbidity in 6-month episodes of mild/moderate or severe mental health problems through 30 months after the disasters; units of service (eg, office visits, prescriptions, hospital nights); intervention costs; and use of human resources.

Results  Full implementation would cost $1133 per capita, or more than $12.5 billion for the affected population, and yield 94.8% to 96.1% recovered by 30 months, but exceed available provider capacity. Partial implementation would lower costs and recovery proportionately.

Conclusions  Evidence-based mental health response is feasible, but requires targeted resources, increased provider capacity, and advanced planning.

 
 
 
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