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Articles by S Harada
Total Records ( 3 ) for S Harada
  S Kitano , Y Higashimoto , S Harada , M Sano , T Kurata , Y Yamaguchi , M Kunitomo , J Haginaka and S. i. Yamagishi
  Background

Circulating oxidized low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) (ox-LDLs) could be a sensitive marker to predict future cardiovascular events. However, a method to evaluate oxidized forms of LDLs systemically in human plasma is not yet established. In this study, we developed a novel and convenient high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for measuring ox-LDL levels in humans.

Methods

Human plasma lipoproteins were separated by a modified HPLC method using a diethylaminoethyl-type anion-exchange gel column with stepwise elution. Ox-LDLs were detected by postcolumn reaction with a regent containing cholesterol esterase and cholesterol oxidase. Particle size of each LDL fraction separated by HPLC was determined in 61 healthy subjects.

Results

Our HPLC method separated LDLs into three fractions, which were designated as LDL-1, LDL-2 and LDL-3, on the basis of their negative charges, with LDL-3 the most strongly retained fraction migrating fastest in the anodic direction, a property that reflects the net negative charge of the molecule. Western blot analysis revealed that apolipoprotein B100 in LDL-3 fraction was the most fragmented and oxidatively modified. When LDLs were oxidized in vitro by Cu2+ or 2,2-azo-bis (2-aminopropane)-2HCl or modified by various aldehydes, all of the LDL fractions migrated at the position of LDL-3. Further, among three fractions, particle size was smallest in LDL-3 fraction.

Conclusion

Here, we developed a convenient HPLC method and identified LDL-3 as oxidized LDL fractions, although ox-LDLs were present in LDL-2 fraction, albeit lesser concentrations than in LDL-3 subfraction. Measuring ox-LDL levels in human plasma by this method may be useful to evaluate atherosclerotic disorders.

  T Mogi , T Kawakami , H Arai , Y Igarashi , K Matsushita , M Mori , K Shiomi , S Omura , S Harada and K. Kita
 

To identify antibiotics targeting to respiratory enzymes, we carried out matrix screening of a structurally varied natural compound library with Pseudomonas aeruginosa membrane-bound respiratory enzymes. We identified a succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor, siccanin (IC50, 0.9 µM), which is a potent antibiotic against some pathogenic fungi like Trichophyton mentagrophytes and inhibits their mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase. We found that siccanin was effective against enzymes from P. aeruginosa, P. putida, rat and mouse mitochondria but ineffective or less effective against Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, and porcine mitochondria enzyme. Action mode was mixed-type for quinone-dependent activity and noncompetitive for succinate-dependent activity, indicating the proximity of the inhibitor-binding site to the quinone-binding site. Species-selective inhibition by siccanin is unique among succinate dehydrogenase inhibitors, and thus siccanin is a potential lead compound for new chemotherapeutics.

  N. T. T Nhien , N. T Huy , M Naito , T Oida , D. T Uyen , M Huang , M Kikuchi , S Harada , K Nakayama , K Hirayama and K. Kamei
 

Free haem is known to be toxic to organs, tissues and cells. It enhances permeability by binding to a cell membrane, which leads to cell death, and damages lipids, proteins and DNA through the generation of reactive oxygen species. Lysine- and arginine-specific gingipains (Kgp and RgpA/B) are major proteinases that play an important role in the pathogenicity of a black-pigmented periodontopathogen named Porphyromonas gingivalis. One of the adhesin domains of gingipain, HbR could bind haem as an iron nutrient source for P. gingivalis. Using erythrocyte and its membrane as a model, results from the present study demonstrate that recombinant HbR expressed in Escherichia coli could inhibit haem-induced haemolysis, probably through removing haem from the haem–membrane complex and lowering free haem toxicity by mediating dimerization of haem molecules. The ability to protect a cell membrane from haem toxicity is a new function for HbR.

 
 
 
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