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Articles by S Basu
Total Records ( 4 ) for S Basu
  R Harfouche , D. M Hentschel , S Piecewicz , S Basu , C Print , D Eavarone , T Kiziltepe , R Sasisekharan and S. Sengupta
 

Background— Therapeutic vasculogenesis is an emerging concept that can potentially be harnessed for the management of ischemic pathologies. The present study elucidates the potential coregulation of vasculogenesis by the heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan–rich cell-surface glycome and the transcriptome.

Methods and Results— Differentiation of embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells in an in vitro embryoid body is paralleled by an amplification of heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan sulfation, which correlates with the levels of the enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase 1 (NDST1). Small hairpin RNA–mediated knockdown of NDST1 or modification of heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans in embryonic stem cells with heparinases or sodium chlorate inhibited differentiation of embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells. This was translated to an in vivo zebrafish embryo model, in which the genetic knockdown of NDST1 resulted in impaired vascularization characterized by a concentration-dependent decrease in intersegmental vessel lumen and a large tail-vessel configuration, which could be rescued by use of exogenous sulfated heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans. To explore the cross talk between the glycome and the transcriptome during vasculogenesis, we identified by microarray and then validated wild-type and NDST1 knockdown–associated gene-expression patterns in zebrafish embryos. Temporal analysis at 3 developmental stages critical for vasculogenesis revealed a cascade of pathways that may mediate glycocalyx regulation of vasculogenesis. These pathways were intimately connected to cell signaling, cell survival, and cell fate determination. Specifically, we demonstrated that forkhead box O3A/5 proteins and insulin-like growth factor were key downstream signals in this process.

Conclusions— The present study for the first time implicates interplay between the glycome and the transcriptome during vasculogenesis, revealing the possibility of harnessing specific cellular glyco-microenvironments for therapeutic vascularization.

  N. L Smith , M. H Chen , A Dehghan , D. P Strachan , S Basu , N Soranzo , C Hayward , I Rudan , M Sabater Lleal , J. C Bis , M. P. M de Maat , A Rumley , X Kong , Q Yang , F. M. K Williams , V Vitart , H Campbell , A Malarstig , K. L Wiggins , C. M Van Duijn , W. L McArdle , J. S Pankow , A. D Johnson , A Silveira , B McKnight , A. G Uitterlinden , Aleksic Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium; , J. B Meigs , A Peters , W Koenig , M Cushman , S Kathiresan , J. I Rotter , E. G Bovill , A Hofman , E Boerwinkle , G. H Tofler , J. F Peden , B. M Psaty , F Leebeek , A. R Folsom , M. G Larson , T. D Spector , A. F Wright , J. F Wilson , A Hamsten , T Lumley , J. C. M Witteman , W Tang and C. J. O'Donnell
 

Background— Plasma levels of coagulation factors VII (FVII), VIII (FVIII), and von Willebrand factor (vWF) influence risk of hemorrhage and thrombosis. We conducted genome-wide association studies to identify new loci associated with plasma levels.

Methods and Results— The setting of the study included 5 community-based studies for discovery comprising 23 608 European-ancestry participants: Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities Study, Cardiovascular Health Study, British 1958 Birth Cohort, Framingham Heart Study, and Rotterdam Study. All subjects had genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) scans and at least 1 phenotype measured: FVII activity/antigen, FVIII activity, and vWF antigen. Each study used its genotype data to impute to HapMap SNPs and independently conducted association analyses of hemostasis measures using an additive genetic model. Study findings were combined by meta-analysis. Replication was conducted in 7604 participants not in the discovery cohort. For FVII, 305 SNPs exceeded the genome-wide significance threshold of 5.0x10–8 and comprised 5 loci on 5 chromosomes: 2p23 (smallest P value 6.2x10–24), 4q25 (3.6x10–12), 11q12 (2.0x10–10), 13q34 (9.0x10–259), and 20q11.2 (5.7x10–37). Loci were within or near genes, including 4 new candidate genes and F7 (13q34). For vWF, 400 SNPs exceeded the threshold and marked 8 loci on 6 chromosomes: 6q24 (1.2x10–22), 8p21 (1.3x10–16), 9q34 (<5.0x10–324), 12p13 (1.7x10–32), 12q23 (7.3x10–10), 12q24.3 (3.8x10–11), 14q32 (2.3x10–10), and 19p13.2 (1.3x10–9). All loci were within genes, including 6 new candidate genes, as well as ABO (9q34) and VWF (12p13). For FVIII, 5 loci were identified and overlapped vWF findings. Nine of the 10 new findings were replicated.

Conclusions— New genetic associations were discovered outside previously known biological pathways and may point to novel prevention and treatment targets of hemostasis disorders.

  A Dehghan , Q Yang , A Peters , S Basu , J. C Bis , A. R Rudnicka , M Kavousi , M. H Chen , J Baumert , G. D.O Lowe , B McKnight , W Tang , M de Maat , M. G Larson , S Eyhermendy , W. L McArdle , T Lumley , J. S Pankow , A Hofman , J. M Massaro , F Rivadeneira , M Kolz , K. D Taylor , C. M van Duijn , S Kathiresan , T Illig , Y. S Aulchenko , K. A Volcik , A. D Johnson , A. G Uitterlinden , G. H Tofler , C Gieger , Psaty Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium , D. J Couper , E Boerwinkle , W Koenig , C. J O`Donnell , J. C Witteman , D. P Strachan , N. L Smith and A. R. Folsom
 

Background— Fibrinogen is both central to blood coagulation and an acute-phase reactant. We aimed to identify common variants influencing circulation fibrinogen levels.

Methods and Results— We conducted a genome-wide association analysis on 6 population-based studies, the Rotterdam Study, the Framingham Heart Study, the Cardiovascular Health Study, the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, the Monitoring of Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease/KORA Augsburg Study, and the British 1958 Birth Cohort Study, including 22 096 participants of European ancestry. Four loci were marked by 1 or more single-nucleotide polymorphisms that demonstrated genome-wide significance (P<5.0x10–8). These included a single-nucleotide polymorphism located in the fibrinogen β chain (FGB) gene and 3 single-nucleotide polymorphisms representing newly identified loci. The high-signal single-nucleotide polymorphisms were rs1800789 in exon 7 of FGB (P=1.8x10–30), rs2522056 downstream from the interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) gene (P=1.3x10–15), rs511154 within intron 1 of the propionyl coenzyme A carboxylase (PCCB) gene (P=5.9x10–10), and rs1539019 on the NLR family pyrin domain containing 3 isoforms (NLRP3) gene (P=1.04x10–8).

Conclusions— Our findings highlight biological pathways that may be important in regulation of inflammation underlying cardiovascular disease.

  D Stuckler , S Basu , M McKee and M. Suhrcke
 

Does the current economic crisis require the deep cuts in public spending announced in the June 2010 emergency budget, with potential implications for public health? The arguments for and against such cuts in response to economic recession are complex, but if public health professionals are to engage in debates about future public spending, they should be informed by relevant evidence. In this perspective, we note that opinions among politicians and economists about how to respond to economic downturns are divided, while other EU countries, many with greater levels of debt than the UK, are protecting public expenditure unless required to do so by the International Monetary Fund. Current UK debt may in fact be viewed as sustainable given current information about interest rates, inflation and economic growth. Before accepting large cuts in public spending, it is important to contrast the lack of evidence for such short-term fixes with potentially dire repercussions for population health and welfare.

 
 
 
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