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Articles by Ronald C. Petersen
Total Records ( 14 ) for Ronald C. Petersen
  Ronald C. Petersen
  Not Available
  Zaven S. Khachaturian , Jordi Cami , Sandrine Andrieu , Jesus Avila , Merce Boada Rovira , Monique Breteler , Lutz Froelich , Serge Gauthier , Teresa Gomez- Isla , Ara S. Khachaturian , Lewis H. Kuller , Eric B. Larson , Oscar L. Lopez , Jose Manuel Martinez- Lage , Ronald C. Petersen , Gerard D. Schellenberg , Jordi Sunyer , Bruno Vellas and Lisa J. Bain
  In recognition of the global problem posed by Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, an international think-tank meeting was convened by Biocat, the Pasqual Maragall Foundation, and the Lou Ruvo Brain Institute in February 2009. The meeting initiated the planning of a European Union-North American collaborative research enterprise to expedite the delay and ultimate prevention of dementing disorders. The key aim is to build parallel and complementary research infrastructure that will support international standardization and inter-operability among researchers in both continents. The meeting identified major challenges, opportunities for research resources and support, integration with ongoing efforts, and identification of key domains to influence the design and administration of the enterprise.
  Rosebud O. Roberts , Yonas E. Geda , David S. Knopman , Bradley F. Boeve , Teresa J.H. Christianson , V. Shane Pankratz , Iftikhar J. Kullo , Eric G. Tangalos , Robert J. Ivnik and Ronald C. Petersen
  Background Inflammation is proposed to play a role in the development of Alzheimer's disease, and may also be involved in the pathogenesis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). This study examined the association of inflammatory markers in serum or plasma with prevalent MCI and MCI subtypes in a population-based sample. Methods Olmsted County, MN, residents aged 70–89 years on October 1, 2004, were evaluated using the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale, a neurological evaluation, and neuropsychological testing. Information ascertained for each participant was reviewed by an expert panel of neuropsychologists, physicians, and nurses, and a diagnosis of normal cognition, MCI, or dementia was made by consensus. C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis alpha (TNFα), and adiponectin were measured at baseline. Results Among 313 subjects with MCI and 1570 cognitively normal subjects, a CRP level in the upper quartile (>3.3 mg/L) was significantly associated with MCI (odds ratio [OR], 1.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00–2.01) and with nonamnestic MCI (OR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.12–3.78) after adjusting for age, sex, and years of education. However, there was no association with amnestic MCI (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 0.81–1.82). No association was observed with the other inflammatory markers. Conclusions Plasma CRP is associated with prevalent MCI and with nonamnestic MCI in elderly, nondemented persons in a population-based setting. These findings suggest the involvement of inflammation in the pathogenesis of MCI.
  Zaven S. Khachaturian , Deborah Barnes , Richard Einstein , Sterling Johnson , Virginia Lee , Allen Roses , Mark A. Sager , William R. Shankle , Peter J. Snyder , Ronald C. Petersen , Gerard Schellenberg , John Trojanowski , Paul Aisen , Marilyn S. Albert , John C.S. Breitner , Neil Buckholtz , Maria Carrillo , Steven Ferris , Barry D. Greenberg , Michael Grundman , Ara S. Khachaturian , Lewis H. Kuller , Oscar L. Lopez , Paul Maruff , Richard C. Mohs , Marcelle Morrison- Bogorad , Creighton Phelps , Eric Reiman , Marwan Sabbagh , Mary Sano , Lon S. Schneider , Eric Siemers , Pierre Tariot , Jacques Touchon , Bruno Vellas and Lisa J. Bain
  Among the major impediments to the design of clinical trials for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most critical is the lack of validated biomarkers, assessment tools, and algorithms that would facilitate identification of asymptomatic individuals with elevated risk who might be recruited as study volunteers. Thus, the Leon Thal Symposium 2009 (LTS'09), on October 27–28, 2009 in Las Vegas, Nevada, was convened to explore strategies to surmount the barriers in designing a multisite, comparative study to evaluate and validate various approaches for detecting and selecting asymptomatic people at risk for cognitive disorders/dementia. The deliberations of LTS'09 included presentations and reviews of different approaches (algorithms, biomarkers, or measures) for identifying asymptomatic individuals at elevated risk for AD who would be candidates for longitudinal or prevention studies. The key nested recommendations of LTS'09 included: (1) establishment of a National Database for Longitudinal Studies as a shared research core resource; (2) launch of a large collaborative study that will compare multiple screening approaches and biomarkers to determine the best method for identifying asymptomatic people at risk for AD; (3) initiation of a Global Database that extends the concept of the National Database for Longitudinal Studies for longitudinal studies beyond the United States; and (4) development of an educational campaign that will address public misconceptions about AD and promote healthy brain aging.
  Sudha Seshadri , Alexa Beiser , Rhoda Au , Philip A. Wolf , Denis A. Evans , Robert S. Wilson , Ronald C. Petersen , Ronald C. Petersen , Walter A. Rocca , Claudia H. Kawas , Maria M. Corrada , Brenda L. Plassman , Kenneth M. Langa and Helena C. Chui
  This article focuses on the effects of operational differences in case ascertainment on estimates of prevalence and incidence of cognitive impairment and/or dementia of the Alzheimer type. Experience and insights are discussed by investigators from the Framingham Heart Study, the East Boston Senior Health Project, the Chicago Health and Aging Project, the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging, the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, and the Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study. There is a general consensus that the single most important factor determining prevalence estimates of Alzheimer‘s disease (AD) is the severity of cognitive impairment used as a threshold to define cases. Studies that require a level of cognitive impairment in which persons are unable to provide self-care will have much lower estimates than the studies aimed at identifying persons in the earliest stages of AD. There are limited autopsy data from the aforementioned epidemiological studies to address accuracy in the diagnosis of etiological subtype, namely the specification of AD alone or in combination with other types of pathology. However, other community-based cohort studies show that many persons with mild cognitive impairment and also some persons without dementia or mild cognitive impairment meet pathological criteria for AD, thereby suggesting that the number of persons who would benefit from an effective secondary prevention intervention is probably higher than the published prevalence estimates. Improved accuracy in the clinical diagnosis of AD is anticipated with the addition of molecular and structural biomarkers in the next generation of epidemiological studies.
  David S. Knopman , Ronald C. Petersen , Walter A. Rocca , Eric B. Larson and Mary Ganguli
  Passive surveillance for disease is a public health approach that relies on documentation available within existing health records for the region or community being studied. Its two primary advantages over active case-finding are the lower cost of research and the lower burden on the population under study. The effectiveness of passive case-finding depends on the comprehensiveness of the healthcare coverage in a given community and the adequacy of the available medical records. The Rochester Epidemiology Project has permitted dementia case detection for Olmsted County, Minnesota, using a medical records-linkage system. These data were compared with case ascertainment using direct assessment of individuals in an epidemiological study of the same community. At the Group Health Research Institute, investigators compared dementia and Alzheimer‘s disease cases detected using an electronic medical record database search with those identified by a parallel active case-finding study. In this article, the advantages and disadvantages of passive case-finding were discussed, and the following conclusion was drawn: the purpose of the study being conducted should determine the case-finding approach that is to be used.
  Walter A. Rocca , Ronald C. Petersen , David S. Knopman , Liesi E. Hebert , Denis A. Evans , Kathleen S. Hall , Sujuan Gao , Frederick W. Unverzagt , Kenneth M. Langa , Eric B. Larson and Lon R. White
  Declines in heart disease and stroke mortality rates are conventionally attributed to reductions in cigarette smoking, recognition and treatment of hypertension and diabetes, effective medications to improve serum lipid levels and to reduce clot formation, and general lifestyle improvements. Recent evidence implicates these and other cerebrovascular factors in the development of a substantial proportion of dementia cases. Analyses were undertaken to determine whether corresponding declines in age-specific prevalence and incidence rates for dementia and cognitive impairment have occurred in recent years. Data spanning 1 or 2 decades were examined from community-based epidemiological studies in Minnesota, Illinois, and Indiana, and from the Health and Retirement Study, which is a national survey. Although some decline was observed in the Minnesota cohort, no statistically significant trends were apparent in the community studies. A significant reduction in cognitive impairment measured by neuropsychological testing was identified in the national survey. Cautious optimism appears justified.
  Zaven S. Khachaturian , Ronald C. Petersen , Peter J. Snyder , Ara S. Khachaturian , Paul Aisen , Mony de Leon , Barry D. Greenberg , Walter Kukull , Paul Maruff , Reisa A. Sperling , Yaakov Stern , Jacques Touchon , Bruno Vellas , Sandrine Andrieu , Michael W. Weiner , Maria C. Carrillo and Lisa J. Bain
  The fourth Leon Thal Symposium (LTS2010) was convened in Toulouse, France, on November 3, 2010. This symposium reviewed design parameters that are necessary to develop comprehensive national databases on healthy aging. Such datasets offer the potential to serve as the foundation for a systems-approach to solve the dual public health problems of: (1) early detection of people who are at elevated risk for Alzheimer‘s disease, and (2) the development of interventions to delay onset of, or prevent, late-life dementia. The symposium considered three interrelated components of a National Database for Longitudinal Studies on Healthy Aging as follows: (a) a registry of healthy aging adults; (b) refined computer-based assessments for data gathering, including assessments of behavioral/memory changes associated with aging that are appropriate for broad use in nonexpert settings; and (c) high performance computing/supercomputer-based approaches for health data modeling and mining
  Stephen D. Weigand , Prashanthi Vemuri , Heather J. Wiste , Matthew L. Senjem , Vernon S. Pankratz , Paul S. Aisen , Michael W. Weiner , Ronald C. Petersen , Leslie M. Shaw , John Q. Trojanowski , David S. Knopman and Clifford R. Jack
  Background Positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging of amyloid with Pittsburgh Compound B (PIB) and Aβ42 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF Aβ42) demonstrate a highly significant inverse correlation. Both these techniques are presumed to measure brain Aβ amyloid load. The objectives of this study were to develop a method to transform CSF Aβ42 measures into calculated PIB measures (PIBcalc) of Aβ amyloid load, and to partially validate the method in an independent sample of subjects. Methods In all, 41 subjects from the Alzheimer‘s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) underwent PIB PET imaging and lumbar puncture (LP) at the same time. This sample, referred to as the ”training“ sample (nine cognitively normal subjects, 22 subjects with mild cognitive impairment, and 10 subjects with Alzheimer‘s disease), was used to develop a regression model by which CSF Aβ42 (with apolipoprotein E ɛ4 carrier status as a covariate) was transformed into units of PIB PET (PIBcalc). An independent ”supporting“ sample of 362 ADNI subjects (105 cognitively normal subjects, 164 subjects with mild cognitive impairment, and 93 subjects with Alzheime‘s disease) who underwent LP but not PIB PET imaging had their CSF Aβ42 values converted to PIBcalc. These values were compared with the overall PIB PET distribution found in the ADNI subjects (n = 102). Results A linear regression model demonstrates good prediction of actual PIB PET from CSF Aβ42 measures obtained in the training sample (R2 = 0.77, P < .001). PIBcalc data (derived from CSF Aβ42) in the supporting sample of 362 ADNI subjects who underwent LP but not PIB PET imaging demonstrate group-wise distributions that are highly consistent with the larger ADNI PIB PET distribution and with published PIB PET imaging studies. Conclusion Although the precise parameters of this model are specific for the ADNI sample, we conclude that CSF Aβ42 can be transformed into PIBcalc measures of Aβ amyloid load. Brain Aβ amyloid load can be ascertained at baseline in therapeutic or observational studies by either CSF or amyloid PET imaging and the data can be pooled using well-established multiple imputation techniques that account for the uncertainty in a CSF-based PIBcalc value.
  Peter J. Snyder , Colleen E. Jackson , Ronald C. Petersen , Ara S. Khachaturian , Jeffrey Kaye , Marilyn S. Albert and Sandra Weintraub
  The demand for rapidly administered, sensitive, and reliable cognitive assessments that are specifically designed for identifying individuals in the earliest stages of cognitive decline (and to measure subtle change over time) has escalated as the emphasis in Alzheimer‘s disease clinical research has shifted from clinical diagnosis and treatment toward the goal of developing presymptomatic neuroprotective therapies. To meet these changing clinical requirements, cognitive measures or tailored batteries of tests must be validated and determined to be fit-for-use for the discrimination between cognitively healthy individuals and persons who are experiencing very subtle cognitive changes that likely signal the emergence of early mild cognitive impairment. We sought to collect and review data systematically from a wide variety of (mostly computer-administered) cognitive measures, all of which are currently marketed or distributed with the claims that these instruments are sensitive and reliable for the early identification of disease or, if untested for this purpose, are promising tools based on other variables. The survey responses for 16 measures/batteries are presented in brief in this review; full survey responses and summary tables are archived and publicly available on the Campaign to Prevent Alzheimer‘s Disease by 2020 Web site (http://pad2020.org). A decision tree diagram highlighting critical decision points for selecting measures to meet varying clinical trials requirements has also been provided. Ultimately, the survey questionnaire, framework, and decision guidelines provided in this review should remain as useful aids for the evaluation of any new or updated sets of instruments in the years to come.
  Niklas Mattsson , Ulf Andreasson , Staffan Persson , Hiroyuki Arai , Sat Dev Batish , Sergio Bernardini , Luisella Bocchio- Chiavetto , Marinus A. Blankenstein , Maria C. Carrillo , Sonia Chalbot , Els Coart , Davide Chiasserini , Neal Cutler , Gunilla Dahlfors , Stefan Duller , Anne M. Fagan , Orestes Forlenza , Giovanni B. Frisoni , Douglas Galasko , Daniela Galimberti , Harald Hampel , Aase Handberg , Michael T. Heneka , Adrianna Z. Herskovits , Sanna-Kaisa Herukka , David M. Holtzman , Christian Humpel , Bradley T. Hyman , Khalid Iqbal , Khalid Iqbal , Stephan A. Kaeser , Elmar Kaiser , Elisabeth Kapaki , Daniel Kidd , Peter Klivenyi , Cindy S. Knudsen , Markus P. Kummer , James Lui , Albert Llado , Piotr Lewczuk , Qiao-Xin Li , Ralph Martins , Colin Masters , John McAuliffe , Marc Mercken , Abhay Moghekar , Jose Luis Molinuevo , Thomas J. Montine , William Nowatzke , Richard O’Brien , Markus Otto , George P. Paraskevas , Lucilla Parnetti , Ronald C. Petersen , David Prvulovic , Herman P.M. de Reus , Robert A. Rissman , Elio Scarpini , Alessandro Stefani , Hilkka Soininen , Johannes Schroder , Leslie M. Shaw , Anders Skinningsrud , Brith Skrogstad and Annette Spreer
  Background The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers amyloid β (Aβ)-42, total-tau (T-tau), and phosphorylated-tau (P-tau) demonstrate good diagnostic accuracy for Alzheimer‘s disease (AD). However, there are large variations in biomarker measurements between studies, and between and within laboratories. The Alzheimer‘s Association has initiated a global quality control program to estimate and monitor variability of measurements, quantify batch-to-batch assay variations, and identify sources of variability. In this article, we present the results from the first two rounds of the program. Methods The program is open for laboratories using commercially available kits for Aβ, T-tau, or P-tau. CSF samples (aliquots of pooled CSF) are sent for analysis several times a year from the Clinical Neurochemistry Laboratory at the Molndal campus of the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Each round consists of three quality control samples. Results Forty laboratories participated. Twenty-six used INNOTEST enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits, 14 used Luminex xMAP with the INNO-BIA AlzBio3 kit (both measure Aβ-(1-42), P-tau(181P), and T-tau), and 5 used Meso Scale Discovery with the Aβ triplex (AβN-42, AβN-40, and AβN-38) or T-tau kits. The total coefficients of variation between the laboratories were 13% to 36%. Five laboratories analyzed the samples six times on different occasions. Within-laboratory precisions differed considerably between biomarkers within individual laboratories. Conclusions Measurements of CSF AD biomarkers show large between-laboratory variability, likely caused by factors related to analytical procedures and the analytical kits. Standardization of laboratory procedures and efforts by kit vendors to increase kit performance might lower variability, and will likely increase the usefulness of CSF AD biomarkers.
  Kristine Yaffe , Michael Tocco , Ronald C. Petersen , Catherine Sigler , Leah C. Burns , Christel Cornelius , Ara S. Khachaturian , Michael C. Irizarry and Maria C. Carrillo
  Epidemiological studies increasingly inform Alzheimer‘s disease (AD) public health impact, prevention strategies, drug targets, therapeutic interventions, and clinical trial design. For this reason, the Alzheimer‘s Association Research Roundtable convened an international group of AD experts with experience in conducting both observational and clinical trials for a meeting on October 19 and 20, 2010, in Washington, DC, to discuss the role of epidemiologic studies in AD research and therapeutic advances. Topics included wellness markers and risk factors, with a focus on special populations such as those at elevated risk, super agers, and underserved populations. Discussions also highlighted lessons learned from observational studies of aging, cardiovascular disease, and other disease areas, as well as how new technologies have enabled the gathering of data relevant to drug development and clinical trial conduct.
  Mary D. Naylor , Jason H. Karlawish , Steven E. Arnold , Ara S. Khachaturian , Zaven S. Khachaturian , Virginia M.-Y. Lee , Matthew Baumgart , Sube Banerjee , Cornelia Beck , Kaj Blennow , Ron Brookmeyer , Kurt R. Brunden , Kathleen C. Buckwalter , Meryl Comer , Kenneth Covinsky , Lynn Friss Feinberg , Giovanni Frisoni , Colin Green , Renato Maia Guimaraes , Lisa P. Gwyther , Franz F. Hefti , Michael Hutton , Claudia Kawas , David M. Kent , Lewis Kuller , Kenneth M. Langa , Robert W. Mahley , Katie Maslow , Colin L. Masters , Diane E. Meier , Peter J. Neumann , Steven M. Paul , Ronald C. Petersen , Mark A. Sager , Mary Sano , Dale Schenk , Holly Soares , Reisa A. Sperling , Sidney M. Stahl , Vivianna van Deerlin , Yaakov Stern , David Weir , David A. Wolk and John Q. Trojanowski
  To address the pending public health crisis due to Alzheimer‘s disease (AD) and related neurodegenerative disorders, the Marian S. Ware Alzheimer Program at the University of Pennsylvania held a meeting entitled "State of the Science Conference on the Advancement of Alzheimer's Diagnosis, Treatment and Care," on June 21-22, 2012. The meeting comprised four workgroups focusing on Biomarkers; Clinical Care and Health Services Research; Drug Development; and Health Economics, Policy, and Ethics. The workgroups shared, discussed, and compiled an integrated set of priorities, recommendations, and action plans, which are presented in this article.
  Maria C. Carrillo , H. Robert Brashear , Veronika Logovinsky , J. Michael Ryan , Howard H. Feldman , Eric R. Siemers , Susan Abushakra , Dean M. Hartley , Ronald C. Petersen , Ara S. Khachaturian and Reisa A. Sperling
  Current research including the basic biology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) provides a foundation to explore whether our current state of knowledge is sufficient to initiate prevention studies and allow us to believe prevention of AD is possible. Current research and recently revised criteria for the diagnosis of AD by the National Institutes on Aging and the Alzheimer's Association suggest a continuum of disease from preclinical asymptomatic to symptomatic Alzheimer's dementia. In light of these revised criteria, the possibility of secondary prevention and even primary prevention is under discussion. The Alzheimer's Association Research Roundtable convened a meeting to discuss the rationale and feasibility of conducting secondary prevention trials in AD.
 
 
 
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