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Articles by Ron Brookmeyer
Total Records ( 3 ) for Ron Brookmeyer
  Elizabeth Colantuoni , Greg Surplus , Andre Hackman , H. Michael Arrighi and Ron Brookmeyer
  Background: Health care planning and research would benefit from tools that enable researchers to project the future burden of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and evaluate the effect of potential interventions. Methods: We created a web-based application of the AD prevalence model developed by Brookmeyer et al (Am J Public Health 1998;88:1337–42; Alzheimers Dement 2007;3:186–91). The user defines the disease parameters and any interventions that may either reduce risk or slow disease progression. We expanded the parameters to include the cost and weights for disability-adjusted life years. Application: The secure, web-based application generates detailed AD projections for each calendar year to 2050, and allows users to create personal accounts for them to save, retrieve, and modify the input parameters. The flexibility of the application is illustrated with a forecast for the state of Maryland, USA. Conclusions: The application generates AD burden projections, costs, and disability-adjusted life years, along with changes associated with potential interventions.
  Ron Brookmeyer , Denis A. Evans , Liesi Hebert , Kenneth M. Langa , Steven G. Heeringa , Brenda L. Plassman and Walter A. Kukull
  Several methods of estimating prevalence of dementia are presented in this article. For both Brookmeyer and the Chicago Health and Aging project (CHAP), the estimates of prevalence are derived statistically, forward calculating from incidence and survival figures. The choice of incidence rates on which to build the estimates may be critical. Brookmeyer used incidence rates from several published studies, whereas the CHAP investigators applied the incidence rates observed in their own cohort. The Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study (ADAMS) and the East Boston Senior Health Project (EBSHP) were sample surveys designed to ascertain the prevalence of Alzheimer‘s disease and dementia. ADAMS obtained direct estimates by relying on probability sampling nationwide. EBSHP relied on projection of localized prevalence estimates to the national population. The sampling techniques of ADAMS and EBSHP were rather similar, whereas their disease definitions were not. By contrast, EBSPH and CHAP have similar disease definitions internally, but use different calculation techniques, and yet arrive at similar prevalence estimates, which are considerably greater than those obtained by either Brookmeyer or ADAMS. Choice of disease definition may play the larger role in explaining differences in observed prevalence between these studies.
  Mary D. Naylor , Jason H. Karlawish , Steven E. Arnold , Ara S. Khachaturian , Zaven S. Khachaturian , Virginia M.-Y. Lee , Matthew Baumgart , Sube Banerjee , Cornelia Beck , Kaj Blennow , Ron Brookmeyer , Kurt R. Brunden , Kathleen C. Buckwalter , Meryl Comer , Kenneth Covinsky , Lynn Friss Feinberg , Giovanni Frisoni , Colin Green , Renato Maia Guimaraes , Lisa P. Gwyther , Franz F. Hefti , Michael Hutton , Claudia Kawas , David M. Kent , Lewis Kuller , Kenneth M. Langa , Robert W. Mahley , Katie Maslow , Colin L. Masters , Diane E. Meier , Peter J. Neumann , Steven M. Paul , Ronald C. Petersen , Mark A. Sager , Mary Sano , Dale Schenk , Holly Soares , Reisa A. Sperling , Sidney M. Stahl , Vivianna van Deerlin , Yaakov Stern , David Weir , David A. Wolk and John Q. Trojanowski
  To address the pending public health crisis due to Alzheimer‘s disease (AD) and related neurodegenerative disorders, the Marian S. Ware Alzheimer Program at the University of Pennsylvania held a meeting entitled "State of the Science Conference on the Advancement of Alzheimer's Diagnosis, Treatment and Care," on June 21-22, 2012. The meeting comprised four workgroups focusing on Biomarkers; Clinical Care and Health Services Research; Drug Development; and Health Economics, Policy, and Ethics. The workgroups shared, discussed, and compiled an integrated set of priorities, recommendations, and action plans, which are presented in this article.
 
 
 
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