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Articles by Robert C. Green
Total Records ( 2 ) for Robert C. Green
  Paul S. Aisen , Ronald C. Petersen , Michael C. Donohue , Anthony Gamst , Rema Raman , Ronald G. Thomas , Sarah Walter , John Q. Trojanowski , Leslie M. Shaw , Laurel A. Beckett , Clifford R. Jack Jr. , William Jagust , Arthur W. Toga , Andrew J. Saykin , John C. Morris , Robert C. Green and Michael W. Weiner
  The Clinical Core of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) has provided clinical, operational, and data management support to ADNI since its inception. This article reviews the activities and accomplishments of the core in support of ADNI aims. These include the enrollment and follow-up of more than 800 subjects in the three original cohorts: healthy controls, amnestic mild cognitive impairment (now referred to as late MCI, or LMCI), and mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in the first phase of ADNI (ADNI 1), with baseline longitudinal, clinical, and cognitive assessments. These data, when combined with genetic, neuroimaging, and cerebrospinal fluid measures, have provided important insights into the neurobiology of the AD spectrum. Furthermore, these data have facilitated the development of novel clinical trial designs. ADNI has recently been extended with funding from an NIH Grand Opportunities (GO) award, and the new ADNI GO phase has been launched; this includes the enrollment of a new cohort, called early MCI, with milder episodic memory impairment than the LMCI group. An application for a further 5 years of ADNI funding (ADNI 2) was recently submitted. This funding would support ongoing follow-up of the original ADNI 1 and ADNI GO cohorts, as well as additional recruitment into all categories. The resulting data would provide valuable data on the earliest stages of AD, and support the development of interventions in these critically important populations.
  Andrew J. Saykin , Li Shen , Tatiana M. Foroud , Steven G. Potkin , Shanker Swaminathan , Sungeun Kim , Shannon L. Risacher , Kwangsik Nho , Matthew J. Huentelman , David W. Craig , Paul M. Thompson , Jason L. Stein , Jason H. Moore , Lindsay A. Farrer , Robert C. Green , Lars Bertram , Clifford R. Jack Jr. and Michael W. Weiner
  The role of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative Genetics Core is to facilitate the investigation of genetic influences on disease onset and trajectory as reflected in structural, functional, and molecular imaging changes; fluid biomarkers; and cognitive status. Major goals include (1) blood sample processing, genotyping, and dissemination, (2) genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of longitudinal phenotypic data, and (3) providing a central resource, point of contact and planning group for genetics within the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Genome-wide array data have been publicly released and updated, and several neuroimaging GWAS have recently been reported examining baseline magnetic resonance imaging measures as quantitative phenotypes. Other preliminary investigations include copy number variation in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease and GWAS of baseline cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and longitudinal changes on magnetic resonance imaging. Blood collection for RNA studies is a new direction. Genetic studies of longitudinal phenotypes hold promise for elucidating disease mechanisms and risk, development of therapeutic strategies, and refining selection criteria for clinical trials.
 
 
 
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