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Articles by Reisa A. Sperling
Total Records ( 7 ) for Reisa A. Sperling
  Zaven S. Khachaturian , Ronald C. Petersen , Peter J. Snyder , Ara S. Khachaturian , Paul Aisen , Mony de Leon , Barry D. Greenberg , Walter Kukull , Paul Maruff , Reisa A. Sperling , Yaakov Stern , Jacques Touchon , Bruno Vellas , Sandrine Andrieu , Michael W. Weiner , Maria C. Carrillo and Lisa J. Bain
  The fourth Leon Thal Symposium (LTS2010) was convened in Toulouse, France, on November 3, 2010. This symposium reviewed design parameters that are necessary to develop comprehensive national databases on healthy aging. Such datasets offer the potential to serve as the foundation for a systems-approach to solve the dual public health problems of: (1) early detection of people who are at elevated risk for Alzheimer‘s disease, and (2) the development of interventions to delay onset of, or prevent, late-life dementia. The symposium considered three interrelated components of a National Database for Longitudinal Studies on Healthy Aging as follows: (a) a registry of healthy aging adults; (b) refined computer-based assessments for data gathering, including assessments of behavioral/memory changes associated with aging that are appropriate for broad use in nonexpert settings; and (c) high performance computing/supercomputer-based approaches for health data modeling and mining
  Clifford R. Jack , Marilyn S. Albert , David S. Knopman , Guy M. McKhann , Reisa A. Sperling , Maria C. Carrillo , Bill Thies and Creighton H. Phelps
  Background Criteria for the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) were established in 1984. A broad consensus now exists that these criteria should be revised to incorporate state-of-the-art scientific knowledge. Methods The National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the Alzheimer's Association sponsored a series of advisory round table meetings in 2009 whose purpose was to establish a process for revising diagnostic and research criteria for AD. The recommendation from these advisory meetings was that three separate work groups should be formed with each assigned the task of formulating diagnostic criteria for one phase of the disease: the dementia phase; the symptomatic, pre-dementia phase; and the asymptomatic, preclinical phase of AD. Results Two notable differences from the AD criteria published in 1984 are incorporation of biomarkers of the underlying disease state and formalization of different stages of disease in the diagnostic criteria. There was a broad consensus within all three workgroups that much additional work is needed to validate the application of biomarkers for diagnostic purposes. In the revised NIA-Alzheimer's Association criteria, a semantic and conceptual distinction is made between AD pathophysiological processes and clinically observable syndromes that result, whereas this distinction was blurred in the 1984 criteria. Conclusions The new criteria for AD are presented in three documents. The core clinical criteria of the recommendations regarding AD dementia and MCI due to AD are intended to guide diagnosis in the clinical setting. However, the recommendations of the preclinical AD workgroup are intended purely for research purposes.
  Reisa A. Sperling , Paul S. Aisen , Laurel A. Beckett , Laurel A. Beckett , Suzanne Craft , Anne M. Fagan , Takeshi Iwatsubo , Clifford R. Jack , Jeffrey Kaye , Thomas J. Montine , Denise C. Park , Eric M. Reiman , Christopher C. Rowe , Eric Siemers , Yaakov Stern , Yaakov Stern , Maria C. Carrillo , Bill Thies , Marcelle Morrison- Bogorad , Molly V. Wagster and Creighton H. Phelps
  The National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer‘s Association charged a workgroup with the task of developing criteria for the symptomatic predementia phase of Alzheimer‘s disease (AD), referred to in this article as mild cognitive impairment due to AD. The workgroup developed the following two sets of criteria: (1) core clinical criteria that could be used by healthcare providers without access to advanced imaging techniques or cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and (2) research criteria that could be used in clinical research settings, including clinical trials. The second set of criteria incorporate the use of biomarkers based on imaging and cerebrospinal fluid measures. The final set of criteria for mild cognitive impairment due to AD has four levels of certainty, depending on the presence and nature of the biomarker findings. Considerable work is needed to validate the criteria that use biomarkers and to standardize biomarker analysis for use in community settings.
  Gad A. Marshall , Dorene M. Rentz , Meghan T. Frey , Joseph J. Locascio , Keith A. Johnson and Reisa A. Sperling
  Background Impairment in instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) leads to early loss in productivity and adds significant burden to caregivers. Executive dysfunction is thought to be an important contributor to functional impairment. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between executive function and IADL in a large cohort of well-characterized normal older controls, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and patients with mild Alzheimer's disease, separately as well as across the entire sample, while accounting for demographic, cognitive, and behavioral factors. Methods Subjects with baseline clinical datasets (n = 793) from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study (228 normal older controls, 387 MCI, 178 Alzheimer's disease) were included in the analysis. A multiple regression model was used to assess the relationship between executive function and IADL. Results A multiple regression model, including diagnosis, global cognitive impairment, memory performance, and other covariates demonstrated a significant relationship between executive dysfunction and IADL impairment across all subjects (R2 = .60, P < .0001 for model; Digit Symbol, partial β = −.044, P = .005; Trailmaking Test B–A, quadratic relation, P = .01). Similarly, an analysis using MCI subjects only yielded a significant relationship (R2 = .16, P < .0001 for model; Digit Symbol, partial β = −.08, P = .001). Conclusions These results suggest that executive dysfunction is a key contributor to impairment in IADL. This relationship was evident even after accounting for degree of memory deficit across the continuum of cognitive impairment and dementia.
  Reisa A. Sperling , Clifford R. Jack , Sandra E. Black , Matthew P. Frosch , Steven M. Greenberg , Bradley T. Hyman , Philip Scheltens , Maria C. Carrillo , William Thies , Martin M. Bednar , Ronald S. Black , H. Robert Brashear , Michael Grundman , Eric R. Siemers , Howard H. Feldman and Rachel J. Schindler
  Amyloid imaging related abnormalities (ARIA) have now been reported in clinical trials with multiple therapeutic avenues to lower amyloid-β burden in Alzheimer‘s disease (AD). In response to concerns raised by the Food and Drug Administration, the Alzheimer‘s Association Research Roundtable convened a working group to review the publicly available trial data, attempts at developing animal models, and the literature on the natural history and pathology of related conditions. The spectrum of ARIA includes signal hyperintensities on fluid attenuation inversion recoverysequences thought to represent ”vasogenic edema“ and/or sulcal effusion (ARIA-E), as well as signal hypointensities on GRE/T2∗ thought to represent hemosiderin deposits (ARIA-H), including microhemorrhage and superficial siderosis. The etiology of ARIA remains unclear but the prevailing data support vascular amyloid as a common pathophysiological mechanism leading to increased vascular permeability. The workgroup proposes recommendations for the detection and monitoring of ARIA in ongoing AD clinical trials, as well as directions for future research.
  Mary D. Naylor , Jason H. Karlawish , Steven E. Arnold , Ara S. Khachaturian , Zaven S. Khachaturian , Virginia M.-Y. Lee , Matthew Baumgart , Sube Banerjee , Cornelia Beck , Kaj Blennow , Ron Brookmeyer , Kurt R. Brunden , Kathleen C. Buckwalter , Meryl Comer , Kenneth Covinsky , Lynn Friss Feinberg , Giovanni Frisoni , Colin Green , Renato Maia Guimaraes , Lisa P. Gwyther , Franz F. Hefti , Michael Hutton , Claudia Kawas , David M. Kent , Lewis Kuller , Kenneth M. Langa , Robert W. Mahley , Katie Maslow , Colin L. Masters , Diane E. Meier , Peter J. Neumann , Steven M. Paul , Ronald C. Petersen , Mark A. Sager , Mary Sano , Dale Schenk , Holly Soares , Reisa A. Sperling , Sidney M. Stahl , Vivianna van Deerlin , Yaakov Stern , David Weir , David A. Wolk and John Q. Trojanowski
  To address the pending public health crisis due to Alzheimer‘s disease (AD) and related neurodegenerative disorders, the Marian S. Ware Alzheimer Program at the University of Pennsylvania held a meeting entitled "State of the Science Conference on the Advancement of Alzheimer's Diagnosis, Treatment and Care," on June 21-22, 2012. The meeting comprised four workgroups focusing on Biomarkers; Clinical Care and Health Services Research; Drug Development; and Health Economics, Policy, and Ethics. The workgroups shared, discussed, and compiled an integrated set of priorities, recommendations, and action plans, which are presented in this article.
  Maria C. Carrillo , H. Robert Brashear , Veronika Logovinsky , J. Michael Ryan , Howard H. Feldman , Eric R. Siemers , Susan Abushakra , Dean M. Hartley , Ronald C. Petersen , Ara S. Khachaturian and Reisa A. Sperling
  Current research including the basic biology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) provides a foundation to explore whether our current state of knowledge is sufficient to initiate prevention studies and allow us to believe prevention of AD is possible. Current research and recently revised criteria for the diagnosis of AD by the National Institutes on Aging and the Alzheimer's Association suggest a continuum of disease from preclinical asymptomatic to symptomatic Alzheimer's dementia. In light of these revised criteria, the possibility of secondary prevention and even primary prevention is under discussion. The Alzheimer's Association Research Roundtable convened a meeting to discuss the rationale and feasibility of conducting secondary prevention trials in AD.
 
 
 
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