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Articles by R. S Vasan
Total Records ( 17 ) for R. S Vasan
  R. B Schnabel , T Aspelund , G Li , L. M Sullivan , A Suchy Dicey , T. B Harris , M. J Pencina , R. B D'Agostino , D Levy , W. B Kannel , T. J Wang , R. A Kronmal , P. A Wolf , G. L Burke , L. J Launer , R. S Vasan , B. M Psaty , E. J Benjamin , V Gudnason and S. R. Heckbert
 

Background  We sought to validate a recently published risk algorithm for incident atrial fibrillation (AF) in independent cohorts and other racial groups.

Methods  We evaluated the performance of a Framingham Heart Study (FHS)-derived risk algorithm modified for 5-year incidence of AF in the FHS (n = 4764 participants) and 2 geographically and racially diverse cohorts in the age range 45 to 95 years: AGES (the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study) (n = 4238) and CHS (the Cardiovascular Health Study) (n = 5410, of whom 874 [16.2%] were African Americans). The risk algorithm included age, sex, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, electrocardiographic PR interval, hypertension treatment, and heart failure.

Results  We found 1359 incident AF events in 100 074 person-years of follow-up. Unadjusted 5-year event rates differed by cohort (AGES, 12.8 cases/1000 person-years; CHS whites, 22.7 cases/1000 person-years; and FHS, 4.5 cases/1000 person-years) and by race (CHS African Americans, 18.4 cases/1000 person-years). The strongest risk factors in all samples were age and heart failure. The relative risks for incident AF associated with risk factors were comparable across cohorts and race groups. After recalibration for baseline incidence and risk factor distribution, the Framingham algorithm, reported in C statistic, performed reasonably well in all samples: AGES, 0.67 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.64-0.71); CHS whites, 0.68 (95% CI, 0.66-0.70); and CHS African Americans, 0.66 (95% CI, 0.61-0.71). Risk factors combined in the algorithm explained between 47.0% (AGES) and 63.6% (FHS) of the population-attributable risk.

Conclusions  Risk of incident AF in community-dwelling whites and African Americans can be assessed reliably by routinely available and potentially modifiable clinical variables. Seven risk factors accounted for up to 64% of risk.

  J Butler , A Kalogeropoulos , V Georgiopoulou , N de Rekeneire , N Rodondi , A. L Smith , U Hoffmann , A Kanaya , A. B Newman , S. B Kritchevsky , R. S Vasan , P. W.F Wilson , T. B Harris and for the Health ABC Study
 

Objective— Resistin is associated with inflammation and insulin resistance and exerts direct effects on myocardial cells including hypertrophy and altered contraction. We investigated the association of serum resistin concentrations with risk for incident heart failure (HF) in humans.

Methods and Results— We studied 2902 older persons without prevalent HF (age, 73.6±2.9 years; 48.1% men; 58.8% white) enrolled in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition (Health ABC) Study. Correlation between baseline serum resistin concentrations (20.3±10.0 ng/mL) and clinical variables, biochemistry panel, markers of inflammation and insulin resistance, adipocytokines, and measures of adiposity was weak (all rho <0.25). During a median follow-up of 9.4 years, 341 participants (11.8%) developed HF. Resistin was strongly associated with risk for incident HF in Cox proportional hazards models controlling for clinical variables, biomarkers, and measures of adiposity (HR, 1.15 per 10.0 ng/mL in adjusted model; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.27; P=0.003). Results were comparable across sex, race, diabetes mellitus, and prevalent and incident coronary heart disease subgroups. In participants with available left ventricular ejection fraction at HF diagnosis (265 of 341; 77.7%), association of resistin with HF risk was comparable for cases with reduced versus preserved ejection fraction.

Conclusions— Serum resistin concentrations are independently associated with risk for incident HF in older persons.

  D. S Lee , P Gona , R. S Vasan , M. G Larson , E. J Benjamin , T. J Wang , J. V Tu and D. Levy
 

Background— The contributions of risk factors and disease pathogenesis to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) versus heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFREF) have not been fully explored.

Methods and Results— We examined clinical characteristics and risk factors at time of heart failure onset and long-term survival in Framingham Heart Study participants according to left ventricular ejection fraction ≤45% (n=314; 59%) versus >45% (n=220; 41%) and hierarchical causal classification. Heart failure was attributed to coronary heart disease in 278 participants (52%), valvular heart disease in 42 (8%), hypertension in 140 (26%), or other/unknown causes in 74 (14%). Multivariable predictors of HFPEF (versus HFREF) included elevated systolic blood pressure (odds ratio [OR]=1.13 per 10 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04 to 1.22), atrial fibrillation (OR=4.23; 95% CI, 2.38 to 7.52), and female sex (OR=2.29; 95% CI, 1.35 to 3.90). Conversely, prior myocardial infarction (OR=0.32; 95% CI, 0.19 to 0.53) and left bundle-branch block QRS morphology (OR=0.21; 95% CI, 0.10 to 0.46) reduced the odds of HFPEF. Long-term prognosis was grim, with a median survival of 2.1 years (5-year mortality rate, 74%), and was equally poor in men and women with HFREF or HFPEF.

Conclusions— Among community patients with new-onset heart failure, there are differences in causes and time-of-onset clinical characteristics between those with HFPEF versus HFREF. In people with HFREF, mortality is increased when coronary heart disease is the underlying cause. These findings suggest that heart failure with reduced left ventricular systolic function and heart failure with preserved left ventricular systolic function are partially distinct entities, with potentially different approaches to early detection and prevention.

  R. S Vasan , S Demissie , M Kimura , L. A Cupples , C White , J. P Gardner , X Cao , D Levy , E. J Benjamin and A. Aviv
 

Background— Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) decreases over the adult life course owing to the cumulative burden of oxidative stress, inflammation, and exposure to vascular risk factors. Left ventricular (LV) mass is a biomarker of long-standing exposure to cardiovascular disease risk factors. We hypothesized that LTL is related inversely to LV mass.

Methods and Results— We related LTL (measured by Southern blot analysis) to echocardiographic LV mass and its components (LV diastolic dimension and LV wall thickness) in 850 Framingham Heart Study participants (mean age 58 years, 58% women) using multivariable linear regression with adjustment for age, sex, height, weight, systolic blood pressure, hypertension treatment, and smoking. Overall, multivariable-adjusted LTL was positively related to LV mass (β-coefficient per SD increase 0.072; P=0.001), LV wall thickness (β=0.053; P=0.01), and LV diastolic dimension (β=0.035; P=0.09). We observed effect modification by hypertension status (P for interaction=0.02 for LV mass); LTL was more strongly associated with LV mass and LV wall thickness in individuals with hypertension (β-coefficient per SD increment of 0.10 and 0.08, respectively; P<0.01 for both). Participants with hypertension who were in the top quartile of LV mass had LTL that was 250 base pairs longer than those in the lowest quartile (P for trend across quartiles=0.009).

Conclusions— In contrast to our expectation, in the present community-based sample, LTL was positively associated with LV mass and wall thickness, especially so in participants with hypertension. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that longer LTL may be a marker of propensity to LV hypertrophy.

  R. S Velagaleti , J Massaro , R. S Vasan , S. J Robins , W. B Kannel and D. Levy
 

Background— The relations of lipid concentrations to heart failure (HF) risk have not been elucidated comprehensively.

Methods and Results— In 6860 Framingham Heart Study participants (mean age, 44 years; 54% women) free of baseline coronary heart disease, we related high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and non-HDL-C to HF incidence during long-term follow-up, adjusting for clinical covariates and myocardial infarction at baseline and updating these at follow-up examinations. We evaluated dyslipidemia-specific population burden of HF by calculating population attributable risks. During follow-up (mean of 26 years), 680 participants (49% women) developed HF. Unadjusted HF incidence in the low (<160 mg/dL) versus high (≥190 mg/dL) non-HDL-C groups was 7.9% and 13.8%, respectively, whereas incidence in the high (≥55 [men], ≥65 [women] mg/dL) versus low (<40 [men], <50 [women] mg/dL) HDL-C groups was 6.1% and 12.8%, respectively. In multivariable models, baseline non-HDL-C and HDL-C, modeled as continuous measures, carried HF hazards (confidence intervals) of 1.19 (1.11 to 1.27) and 0.82 (0.75 to 0.90), respectively, per SD increment. In models updating lipid concentrations every 8 years, the corresponding hazards (confidence intervals) were 1.23 (1.16 to 1.31) and 0.77 (0.70 to 0.85). Participants with high baseline non-HDL-C and those with low HDL-C experienced a 29% and 40% higher HF risk, respectively, compared with those in the desirable categories; the population attributable risks for high non-HDL-C and low HDL-C were 7.5% and 15%, respectively. Hazards associated with non-HDL-C and HDL-C remained statistically significant after additional adjustment for interim myocardial infarction.

Conclusions— Dyslipidemia carries HF risk independent of its association with myocardial infarction, suggesting that lipid modification may be a means for reducing HF risk.

  R. S Vasan , M. J Pencina , S. J Robins , J. P Zachariah , G Kaur , R. B D'Agostino and J. M. Ordovas
 

Background— Plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration is related inversely to the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Inhibiting cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity raises high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and may be cardioprotective, but an initial clinical trial with a CETP inhibitor was stopped prematurely because of increased CVD in treated patients, raising concerns about this approach. Data relating circulating CETP concentrations to CVD incidence in the community are conflicting.

Methods and Results— Plasma CETP activity was measured in 1978 Framingham Heart Study participants (mean age, 51 years; 54% women) who attended a routine examination in 1987–1990 and were free of CVD. On follow-up (mean, 15.1 years), 320 participants experienced a first CVD event (fatal or nonfatal coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral vascular disease, or heart failure). In multivariable analyses adjusted for standard risk factors including high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, plasma CETP activity was related inversely to the incidence of CVD events (hazard ratio for activity, at or above the median of 0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.57 to 0.90; P=0.004 [compared with below median]; hazard ratio per SD increment, 0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.76 to 0.97; P=0.01). The inverse association of CETP activity with CVD incidence remained robust in time-dependent models updating standard risk factors every 4 years and was maintained in analyses of incident "hard" CVD events (myocardial infarction, stroke, or heart failure).

Conclusions— In our prospective investigation of a community-based sample, lower plasma CETP activity was associated with greater CVD risk. These observations, if confirmed, challenge the concept that CETP inhibition may lower CVD risk.

  R Sofat , A. D Hingorani , L Smeeth , S. E Humphries , P. J Talmud , J Cooper , T Shah , M. S Sandhu , S. L Ricketts , S. M Boekholdt , N Wareham , K. T Khaw , M Kumari , M Kivimaki , M Marmot , F. W Asselbergs , P van der Harst , R. P.F Dullaart , G Navis , D. J van Veldhuisen , W. H Van Gilst , J. F Thompson , P McCaskie , L. J Palmer , M Arca , F Quagliarini , C Gaudio , F Cambien , V Nicaud , O Poirer , V Gudnason , A Isaacs , J. C.M Witteman , C. M van Duijn , M Pencina , R. S Vasan , R. B D'Agostino , J Ordovas , T. Y Li , S Kakko , H Kauma , M. J Savolainen , Y. A Kesaniemi , A Sandhofer , B Paulweber , J. V Sorli , A Goto , S Yokoyama , K Okumura , B. D Horne , C Packard , D Freeman , I Ford , N Sattar , V McCormack , D. A Lawlor , S Ebrahim , G. D Smith , J. J.P Kastelein , J Deanfield and J. P. Casas
 

Background— Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, but torcetrapib, the first-in-class inhibitor tested in a large outcome trial, caused an unexpected blood pressure elevation and increased cardiovascular events. Whether the hypertensive effect resulted from CETP inhibition or an off-target action of torcetrapib has been debated. We hypothesized that common single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the CETP gene could help distinguish mechanism-based from off-target actions of CETP inhibitors to inform on the validity of CETP as a therapeutic target.

Methods and Results— We compared the effect of CETP single-nucleotide polymorphisms and torcetrapib treatment on lipid fractions, blood pressure, and electrolytes in up to 67 687 individuals from genetic studies and 17 911 from randomized trials. CETP single-nucleotide polymorphisms and torcetrapib treatment reduced CETP activity and had a directionally concordant effect on 8 lipid and lipoprotein traits (total, low-density lipoprotein, and HDL cholesterol; HDL2; HDL3; apolipoproteins A-I and B; and triglycerides), with the genetic effect on HDL cholesterol (0.13 mmol/L, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.11 to 0.14 mmol/L) being consistent with that expected of a 10-mg dose of torcetrapib (0.13 mmol/L, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.15). In trials, 60 mg of torcetrapib elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressure by 4.47 mm Hg (95% CI 4.10 to 4.84 mm Hg) and 2.08 mm Hg (95% CI 1.84 to 2.31 mm Hg), respectively. However, the effect of CETP single-nucleotide polymorphisms on systolic blood pressure (0.16 mm Hg, 95% CI –0.28 to 0.60 mm Hg) and diastolic blood pressure (–0.04 mm Hg, 95% CI –0.36 to 0.28 mm Hg) was null and significantly different from that expected of 10 mg of torcetrapib.

Conclusions— Discordance in the effects of CETP single-nucleotide polymorphisms and torcetrapib treatment on blood pressure despite the concordant effects on lipids indicates the hypertensive action of torcetrapib is unlikely to be due to CETP inhibition or shared by chemically dissimilar CETP inhibitors. Genetic studies could find a place in drug-development programs as a new source of randomized evidence for drug-target validation in humans.

  J. E Freedman , M. G Larson , K Tanriverdi , C. J O'Donnell , K Morin , A. S Hakanson , R. S Vasan , A. D Johnson , M. D Iafrati and E. J. Benjamin
 

Background— Although many genetic epidemiology and biomarker studies have been conducted to examine associations of genetic variants and circulating proteins with cardiovascular disease and risk factors, there has been little study of gene expression or transcriptomics. Quantitative differences in the abundance of transcripts has been demonstrated in malignancies, but gene expression from a large community-based cohort examining risk of cardiovascular disease has never been reported.

Methods and Results— On the basis of preliminary microarray data and previously suggested genes from the literature, we measured expression of 48 genes by high-throughput quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in 1846 participants of the Framingham Offspring cohort from RNA derived from isolated platelets and leukocytes. A multivariable stepwise regression model was used to assess clinical correlates of quantitative RNA expression. For specific inflammatory platelet-derived transcripts, including ICAM1, IFNG, IL1R1, IL6, MPO, COX2, TNF, TLR2, and TLR4, there were significant associations with higher body mass index (BMI). Compared with platelets, fewer leukocyte-derived transcripts were associated with BMI or other cardiovascular risk factors. Select transcripts were found to be highly heritable, including GPIBA and COX1. Almost uniformly, heritable transcripts were not those associated with BMI.

Conclusions— Inflammatory transcripts derived from platelets, particularly those part of the nuclear factor B pathway, are associated with BMI, whereas others are heritable. This is the first study, using a large community-based cohort, to demonstrate clinical correlates of gene expression and is consistent with the hypothesis that specific peripheral-blood transcripts play a role in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease and its risk factors.

  G Thanassoulis , J. M Massaro , C. J O'Donnell , U Hoffmann , D Levy , P. T Ellinor , T. J Wang , R. B Schnabel , R. S Vasan , C. S Fox and E. J. Benjamin
  Background—

Obesity represents an important risk factor for atrial fibrillation (AF). We tested the hypothesis that pericardial fat, a unique fat deposit in close anatomic proximity to cardiac structures and autonomic fibers, is associated with prevalent AF.

Methods and Results—

Participants from the Framingham Heart Study underwent multidetector computed tomography from 2002 to 2005. We estimated the association between quantitative pericardial, intrathoracic and visceral adipose tissue volumes (per standard deviation of volume) with prevalent AF adjusting for established AF risk factors (age, sex, systolic blood pressure, blood pressure treatment, PR interval, and clinically significant valvular disease). Of the 3217 eligible participants (mean age, 50.6±10.1 years; 48% women), 54 had a confirmed diagnosis of AF. Pericardial fat but not intrathoracic or visceral abdominal fat was associated with prevalent AF in multivariable-adjusted models (odds ratio per standard deviation of pericardial fat volume, 1.28; 95% confidence intervals, 1.03 to 1.58). Further adjustments for body mass index, heart failure, myocardial infarction, and intrathoracic fat volume did not materially change the association between pericardial fat and AF.

Conclusions—

Pericardial fat was associated with prevalent AF even after adjustment for AF risk factors, including body mass index. If this association is replicated, further investigations into the mechanisms linking pericardial fat to AF are merited.

  R. B Schnabel , K. L Lunetta , M. G Larson , J Dupuis , I Lipinska , J Rong , M. H Chen , Z Zhao , J. F Yamamoto , J. B Meigs , V Nicaud , C Perret , T Zeller , S Blankenberg , L Tiret , J. F Keaney , R. S Vasan and E. J. Benjamin
 

Background— Environmental and genetic correlates of inflammatory marker variability are incompletely understood. In the family-based Framingham Heart Study, we investigated heritability and candidate gene associations of systemic inflammatory biomarkers.

Methods and Results— In offspring participants (n=3710), we examined 11 inflammatory biomarkers (CD40 ligand, C-reactive protein, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, interleukin-6, urinary isoprostanes, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, myeloperoxidase, P-selectin, tumor necrosis factor-, tumor necrosis factor receptor II, fibrinogen). Heritability and bivariate genetic and environmental correlations were assessed by Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis routines in 1012 family members. We examined 1943 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 233 inflammatory pathway genes with ≥5 minor allele carriers using a general genetic linear model. Clinical correlates explained 2.4% (CD40 ligand) to 28.5% (C-reactive protein) of the variability in inflammatory biomarkers. Estimated heritability ranged from 10.9% (isoprostanes) to 44.8% (P-selectin). Most correlations between biomarkers were weak although statistically significant. A total of 45 single-nucleotide polymorphism-biomarker associations met the q-value threshold of 0.25. Novel top single-nucleotide polymorphisms were observed in ICAM1 gene in relation to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 concentrations (rs1799969, P=1.32x10–8) and MPO in relation to myeloperoxidase (rs28730837, P=1.9x10–5). Lowest P values for trans-acting single-nucleotide polymorphisms were observed for APCS with monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 concentrations (rs1374486, P=1.01x10–7) and confirmed for IL6R with interleukin-6 concentrations (rs8192284, P=3.36x10–5). Novel potential candidates (APCS, MPO) need to be replicated.

Conclusions— Our community-based data support the relevance of clinical and genetic factors for explaining variation in inflammatory biomarker traits.

  A. C Morrison , J. F Felix , L. A Cupples , N. L Glazer , L. R Loehr , A Dehghan , S Demissie , J. C Bis , W. D Rosamond , Y. S Aulchenko , Y. A Wang , T Haritunians , A. R Folsom , F Rivadeneira , E. J Benjamin , T Lumley , D Couper , B. H Stricker , C. J O'Donnell , K. M Rice , P. P Chang , A Hofman , D Levy , J. I Rotter , E. R Fox , A. G Uitterlinden , T. J Wang , B. M Psaty , J. T Willerson , C. M van Duijn , E Boerwinkle , J. C. M Witteman , R. S Vasan and N. L. Smith
  Background—

Prognosis and survival are significant concerns for individuals with heart failure (HF). To better understand the pathophysiology of HF prognosis, the association between 2 366 858 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and all-cause mortality was evaluated among individuals with incident HF from 4 community-based prospective cohorts: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, the Cardiovascular Health Study, the Framingham Heart Study, and the Rotterdam Study.

Methods and Results—

Participants were 2526 individuals of European ancestry and 466 individuals of African ancestry who experienced an incident HF event during follow-up in the respective cohorts. Within each study, the association between genetic variants and time to mortality among individuals with HF was assessed by Cox proportional hazards models that included adjustment for sex and age at the time of the HF event. Prospective fixed-effect meta-analyses were conducted for the 4 study populations of European ancestry (N=1645 deaths) and for the 2 populations of African ancestry (N=281 deaths). Genome-wide significance was set at P=5.0x10–7. Meta-analytic findings among individuals of European ancestry revealed 1 genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 3p22 in an intron of CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain containing 7 (CMTM7, P=3.2x10–7). Eight additional loci in individuals of European ancestry and 4 loci in individuals of African ancestry were identified by high-signal SNPs (P<1.0x10–5) but did not meet genome-wide significance.

Conclusions—

This study identified a novel locus associated with all-cause mortality among individuals of European ancestry with HF. This finding warrants additional investigation, including replication, in other studies of HF.

  K Musunuru , G Lettre , T Young , D. N Farlow , J. P Pirruccello , K. G Ejebe , B. J Keating , Q Yang , M. H Chen , N Lapchyk , A Crenshaw , L Ziaugra , A Rachupka , E. J Benjamin , L. A Cupples , M Fornage , E. R Fox , S. R Heckbert , J. N Hirschhorn , C Newton Cheh , M. M Nizzari , D. N Paltoo , G. J Papanicolaou , S. R Patel , B. M Psaty , D. J Rader , S Redline , S. S Rich , J. I Rotter , H. A Taylor , R. P Tracy , R. S Vasan , J. G Wilson , S Kathiresan , R. R Fabsitz , E Boerwinkle , S. B Gabriel and for the NHLBI Candidate Gene Association Resource
  Background—

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe), a planned cross-cohort analysis of genetic variation in cardiovascular, pulmonary, hematologic, and sleep-related traits, comprises >40 000 participants representing 4 ethnic groups in 9 community-based cohorts. The goals of CARe include the discovery of new variants associated with traits using a candidate gene approach and the discovery of new variants using the genome-wide association mapping approach specifically in African Americans.

Methods and Results—

CARe has assembled DNA samples for >40 000 individuals self-identified as European American, African American, Hispanic, or Chinese American, with accompanying data on hundreds of phenotypes that have been standardized and deposited in the CARe Phenotype Database. All participants were genotyped for 7 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected based on prior association evidence. We performed association analyses relating each of these SNPs to lipid traits, stratified by sex and ethnicity, and adjusted for age and age squared. In at least 2 of the ethnic groups, SNPs near CETP, LIPC, and LPL strongly replicated for association with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, PCSK9 with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and LPL and APOA5 with serum triglycerides. Notably, some SNPs showed varying effect sizes and significance of association in different ethnic groups.

Conclusions—

The CARe Pilot Study validates the operational framework for phenotype collection, SNP genotyping, and analytic pipeline of the CARe project and validates the planned candidate gene study of 2000 biological candidate loci in all participants and genome-wide association study in 8000 African American participants. CARe will serve as a valuable resource for the scientific community.

  G Thanassoulis , J. M Massaro , U Hoffmann , A. A Mahabadi , R. S Vasan , C. J O'Donnell and C. S. Fox
  Background—

Pericardial and intrathoracic fat depots may represent novel risk factors for obesity-related cardiovascular disease. We sought to determine the prevalence, distribution, and risk factor correlates of high pericardial and intrathoracic fat deposits.

Methods and Results—

Participants from the Framingham Heart Study (n=3312; mean age, 52 years; 48% women) underwent multidetector CT imaging in 2002 to 2005; high pericardial and high intrathoracic fat were defined on the basis of the sex-specific 90th percentile for these fat depots in a healthy reference sample. For men and women, the prevalence of high pericardial fat was 29.3% and 26.3%, respectively, and high intrathoracic fat was 31.4% and 35.3%, respectively. Overall, 22.1% of the sample was discordant for pericardial and intrathoracic fat depots: 8.3% had high pericardial but normal intrathoracic fat and 13.8% had high intrathoracic but normal pericardial fat. Higher body mass index, higher waist circumference, and increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome were more prevalent in participants with high intrathoracic fat depots than with high pericardial fat (P<0.05 for all comparisons). High abdominal visceral adipose tissue was more frequent in participants with high intrathoracic adipose tissue compared with those with high pericardial fat (P<0.001). Intrathoracic fat but not waist circumference was more highly correlated with visceral adipose tissue (r=0.76 and 0.78 in men and women, respectively; P<0.0001) than with subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) (r=0.46 and 0.54 in men and women, respectively; P<0.0001).

Conclusions—

Although prevalence of pericardial fat and intrathoracic fat were comparable at 30%, intrathoracic fat correlated more closely with metabolic risk and visceral fat. Intrathoracic fat may be a potential marker of metabolic risk and visceral fat on thoracic imaging.

  P. S Wild , C. R Sinning , A Roth , S Wilde , R. B Schnabel , E Lubos , T Zeller , T Keller , K. J Lackner , M Blettner , R. S Vasan , T Munzel and S. Blankenberg
  Background—

Echocardiography, the dominant imaging modality for quantification of left ventricular metrics, has undergone continuing development in the past few decades. However, given the lack of population-based data, current guidelines are still based on restricted and small data sets analyzed with methods including expert opinion. This work presents empirically derived reference values from a large-scale, epidemiologic study conducted with state-of-the-art imaging technology and methods.

Methods and Results—

The distribution of echocardiographic measurements of the left ventricle was analyzed in a population-based sample of 5000 mid-Europeans from the Gutenberg Heart Study in Germany. The randomly selected, noninstitutionalized sample provides data on apparently healthy individuals, as well as on those with prevalent disease. Standardized echocardiograms were recorded in a comprehensive data set at a single site with centralized training and certification of sonographers. Sex-specific reference limits and categories indicating the grade of deviation from the reference were calculated, and nomograms were created by quantile regression. Detailed information is given on the association between left ventricular geometry and age.

Conclusions—

The rapidly evolving echocardiographic technology with persistent improvements in image quality and new measurement conventions require the evaluation of new reference limits for left ventricular metrics. The present investigation formulates reference limits and nomograms from state-of-the-art technology and methods based on a large population-based data set. The distribution of echocardiographic measures of left ventricular geometry presents, in part, nonlinear associations with age, which should be the subject of future investigations.

  A Kalogeropoulos , B. M Psaty , R. S Vasan , V Georgiopoulou , A. L Smith , N. L Smith , S. B Kritchevsky , P. W. F Wilson , A. B Newman , T. B Harris , J Butler and for the Cardiovascular Health Study
  Background—

The recently developed and internally validated Health ABC HF model uses 9 routinely available clinical variables to determine incident heart failure risk. In this study, we sought to externally validate the Health ABC HF model.

Methods and Results—

Observed 5-year incidence of heart failure, defined as first hospitalization for new-onset heart failure, was compared with 5-year risk estimates derived from the Health ABC HF model among participants without heart failure at baseline in the Cardiovascular Health Study. During follow-up, 400 of 5335 (7.5%) participants developed heart failure over 5 years versus 364 (6.8%) predicted by the Health ABC HF model (predicted-to-observed ratio, 0.90). Observed versus predicted 5-year heart failure probabilities were 3.2% versus 2.8%, 9.0% versus 7.0%, 15.9% versus 13.7%, and 24.6% versus 30.8% for the <5%, 5% to 10%, 10% to 20%, and >20% 5-year risk categories, respectively. The Hosmer-Lemeshow 2 was 14.72 (degrees of freedom, 10; P=0.14), and the C index was 0.74 (95% CI, 0.72 to 0.76). Calibration and discrimination demonstrated adequate performance across sex and race overall; however, risk was underestimated in white men, especially in the 5% to 10% risk category. Model performance was optimal when participants with normal left ventricular function at baseline were assessed separately. Performance was consistent across age groups. Analyses with death as a competing risk yielded similar results.

Conclusions—

The Health ABC HF model adequately predicted 5-year heart failure risk in a large community-based study, providing support for the external validity of the model. This tool may be used to identify individuals to whom to target heart failure prevention efforts.

  S. A Porter , J. M Massaro , U Hoffmann , R. S Vasan , C. J O`Donnel and C. S. Fox
  OBJECTIVE

Obesity is associated with increased metabolic and cardiovascular risk. The ectopic fat hypothesis suggests that subcutaneous fat may be protective, but this theory has yet to be fully explored.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS

Participants from the Framingham Heart Study (n = 3,001, 48.5% women) were stratified by visceral adipose tissue (VAT) into sex-specific tertiles. Within these tertiles, age-adjusted abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) tertiles were examined in relation to cardiometabolic risk factors.

RESULTS

In the lowest VAT tertile, risk factor prevalence was low, although systolic blood pressure in women and rates of high triglycerides, impaired fasting glucose, hypertension, and the metabolic syndrome in men increased with increasing SAT tertile (all P < 0.04). In contrast, in the top VAT tertile, lower triglycerides were observed in men with increasing SAT (64.4% high triglycerides in SAT tertile 1 vs. 52.7% in SAT tertile 3, P = 0.03). Similar observations were made for women, although results were not statistically significant (50.6% high triglycerides in SAT tertile 1 vs. 41.0% in tertile 3, P = 0.10). Results in the highest VAT tertile were notable for a lack of increase in the prevalence of low HDL in men and women and in rates of impaired fasting glucose in men with increasing subcutaneous fat, despite sizable differences in BMI across SAT tertiles (27.1 to 36.3 kg/m2[women]; 28.1 to 35.7 kg/m2[men]).

CONCLUSIONS

Although adiposity increases the absolute risk of metabolic and cardiovascular disease, abdominal subcutaneous fat is not associated with a linear increase in the prevalence of all risk factors among the obese, most notably, high triglycerides.

 
 
 
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