Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by R. L Davis
Total Records ( 3 ) for R. L Davis
  A Goyal , C. R Norton , T. N Thomas , R. L Davis , J Butler , V Ashok , L Zhao , V Vaccarino and P. W. F. Wilson
  Background—

Studies on the incidence and predictors of heart failure (HF) are often restricted to elderly persons or identify only inpatient cases.

Methods and Results—

We determined the incidence and predictors of new HF diagnosed in either outpatient or inpatient settings, among 359 947 women and men (age ≥18 years) insured by Kaiser Permanente Georgia at any time during calendar years 2000 to 2005. Subjects were free of HF at baseline, and incident HF was identified with ICD-9 codes (1 inpatient or 2 outpatient HF visits). We developed multivariable Cox models to assess the association of antecedent factors (coronary heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, and valvular heart disease) with incident HF. Separate models were created for each sex and for newly diagnosed HF in outpatient or inpatient settings. There were 4001 incident HF cases (50% women and 48% in subjects <65 years old), during 1 015 794 person-years of follow-up. The incidence rate of HF was greater in men than in women (4.24 versus 3.68 per 1000 person-years) but was stable across the study interval in both sexes. Two thirds of incident HF cases from this population occurred in outpatients. These 5 antecedent factors and age yielded excellent discrimination for incident HF in both outpatients and inpatients and in both sexes (C >0.85 in all models).

Conclusions—

Common modifiable risk factors accurately discriminate women and men at risk for HF diagnosed in either outpatient or inpatient settings. Approximately two thirds of new HF cases in our insured population were diagnosed in outpatients; more research is needed to characterize these subjects and their prognosis.

  A. N Freedman , L. B Sansbury , W. D Figg , A. L Potosky , S. R Weiss Smith , M. J Khoury , S. A Nelson , R. M Weinshilboum , M. J Ratain , H. L McLeod , R. S Epstein , G. S Ginsburg , R. L Schilsky , G Liu , D. A Flockhart , C. M Ulrich , R. L Davis , L. J Lesko , I Zineh , G Randhawa , C. B Ambrosone , M. V Relling , N Rothman , H Xie , M. R Spitz , R Ballard Barbash , J. H Doroshow and L. M. Minasian
 

Recent advances in genomic research have demonstrated a substantial role for genomic factors in predicting response to cancer therapies. Researchers in the fields of cancer pharmacogenomics and pharmacoepidemiology seek to understand why individuals respond differently to drug therapy, in terms of both adverse effects and treatment efficacy. To identify research priorities as well as the resources and infrastructure needed to advance these fields, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored a workshop titled "Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Setting a Research Agenda to Accelerate Translation" on July 21, 2009, in Bethesda, MD. In this commentary, we summarize and discuss five science-based recommendations and four infrastructure-based recommendations that were identified as a result of discussions held during this workshop. Key recommendations include 1) supporting the routine collection of germline and tumor biospecimens in NCI-sponsored clinical trials and in some observational and population-based studies; 2) incorporating pharmacogenomic markers into clinical trials; 3) addressing the ethical, legal, social, and biospecimen- and data-sharing implications of pharmacogenomic and pharmacoepidemiologic research; and 4) establishing partnerships across NCI, with other federal agencies, and with industry. Together, these recommendations will facilitate the discovery and validation of clinical, sociodemographic, lifestyle, and genomic markers related to cancer treatment response and adverse events, and they will improve both the speed and efficiency by which new pharmacogenomic and pharmacoepidemiologic information is translated into clinical practice.

  R. L Davis , B. A Therrien and B. T. West
 

Individuals create cognitive maps based on relationships between cues in the environment. Older individuals are often impaired in wayfinding, especially in environments that lack distinctive features. This study examines how working memory ability in older women is related to wayfinding performance in the presence of salient (distinctive, prominent) or nonsalient cues. The degree of salient cue complexity is also examined, thus leading to the hypothesis that salient, complex cues are important in wayfinding and that working memory capacity is related to wayfinding performance. The virtual computer-generated arena is used to test this hypothesis in 20 healthy older women in three different environmental cue conditions varying in salience and complexity. Data analyses indicate that older women perform best in salient cue conditions. A greater working memory capacity is related to improved performance in the nonsalient cue condition. These findings offer preliminary evidence that cue salience is especially important in wayfinding.

 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility