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Articles by R. A Newman
Total Records ( 3 ) for R. A Newman
  E. S Kim , W. K Hong , J. J Lee , L Mao , R. C Morice , D. D Liu , C. A Jimenez , G. A Eapen , R Lotan , X Tang , R. A Newman , I. I Wistuba and J. M. Kurie
 

Non–small cell lung cancer is the primary cause of cancer-related death in Western countries. One important approach taken to address this problem is the development of effective chemoprevention strategies. In this study, we examined whether the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib, as evidenced by decreased cell proliferation, is biologically active in the bronchial epithelium of current and former smokers. Current or former smokers with at least a 20 pack-year (pack-year = number of packs of cigarettes per day times number of years smoked) smoking history were randomized into one of four treatment arms (3-month intervals of celecoxib then placebo, celecoxib then celecoxib, placebo then celecoxib, or placebo then placebo) and underwent bronchoscopies with biopsies at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. The 204 patients were primarily (79.4%) current smokers: 81 received either low-dose celecoxib or placebo and 123 received either high-dose celecoxib or placebo. Celecoxib was originally administered orally at 200 mg twice daily and the protocol subsequently increased the dose to 400 mg twice daily. The primary end point was change in Ki-67 labeling (from baseline to 3 months) in bronchial epithelium. No cardiac toxicities were observed in the participants. Although the effect of low-dose treatment was not significant, high-dose celecoxib decreased Ki-67 labeling by 3.85% in former smokers and by 1.10% in current smokers—a significantly greater reduction (P = 0.02) than that seen with placebo after adjusting for metaplasia and smoking status. A 3- to 6-month celecoxib regimen proved safe to administer. Celecoxib (400 mg twice daily) was biologically active in the bronchial epithelium of current and former smokers; additional studies on the efficacy of celecoxib in non–small cell lung cancer chemoprevention may be warranted. Cancer Prev Res; 3(2); 148–59

  I Shureiqi , D Chen , R. S Day , X Zuo , F. L Hochman , W. A Ross , R. A Cole , O Moy , J. S Morris , L Xiao , R. A Newman , P Yang and S. M. Lippman
 

Lipoxygenases (LOX) are key enzymes for the oxidative metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids into biologically active products. Clinical data on comparative levels of various LOX products in tumorigenesis are lacking. Therefore, we examined the profiles of several LOX products (5-LOX, 12-LOX, 15-LOX-1, and 15-LOX-2) by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry in the major steps of colorectal tumorigenesis (normal, polyp, and cancer) in a clinical study of 125 subjects (49 with normal colon, 36 with colorectal polyps, and 40 with colorectal cancer) who underwent prospective colorectal biopsies to control for various potential confounding factors (e.g., diet, medications). Mean 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HODE) levels were significantly higher in normal colon [mean, 36.11 ng/mg protein; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 31.56-40.67] than in paired colorectal cancer mucosa (mean, 27.01 ng/mg protein; 95% CI, 22.00-32.02; P = 0.0002), and in normal colon (mean, 37.15 ng/mg protein; 95% CI, 31.95-42.34) than in paired colorectal polyp mucosa (mean, 28.07 ng/mg protein; 95% CI, 23.66-32.48; P < 0.001). Mean 13-HODE levels, however, were similar between the left (mean, 37.15 ng/mg protein; 95% CI, 31.95-42.35) and the right normal colon (mean, 32.46 ng/mg protein; 95% CI, 27.95-36.98; P = 0.09). No significant differences with regard to 12- or 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid or leukotriene B4 levels were detected between normal, polyp, and cancer mucosae. 15-LOX-1 inhibited interleukin-1β expression. This study establishes that reduced 13-HODE levels are a specific alteration in the LOX product profile associated with human colorectal tumorigenesis. Cancer Prev Res; 3(7); 829–38. ©2010 AACR.

  S.J Moghaddam , P Barta , S.G Mirabolfathinejad , Z Ammar Aouchiche , N. T Garza , T.T Vo , R. A Newman , B. B Aggarwal , C. M Evans , M. J Tuvim , R Lotan and B. F. Dickey
 

Recent studies have demonstrated that K-ras mutations in lung epithelial cells elicit inflammation that promotes carcinogenesis in mice (intrinsic inflammation). The finding that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), an inflammatory disease of the lung, have an increased risk of lung cancer after controlling for smoking suggests a further link between lung cancer and extrinsic inflammation. Besides exposure to cigarette smoke, it is thought that airway inflammation in COPD is caused by bacterial colonization, particularly with non-typeable Hemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Previously, we have shown that NTHi-induced COPD-like airway inflammation promotes lung cancer in an airway conditional K-ras-induced mouse model. To further test the role of inflammation in cancer promotion, we administered the natural anti-inflammatory agent, curcumin, 1% in diet before and during weekly NTHi exposure. This significantly reduced the number of visible lung tumors in the absence of NTHi exposure by 85% and in the presence of NTHi exposures by 53%. Mechanistically, curcumin markedly suppressed NTHi-induced increased levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant keratinocyte-derived chemokine by 80% and neutrophils by 87% in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In vitro studies of murine K-ras-induced lung adenocarcinoma cell lines (LKR-10 and LKR-13) indicated direct anti-tumoral effects of curcumin by reducing cell viability, colony formation and inducing apoptosis. We conclude that curcumin suppresses the progression of K-ras-induced lung cancer in mice by inhibiting intrinsic and extrinsic inflammation and by direct anti-tumoral effects. These findings suggest that curcumin could be used to protract the premalignant phase and inhibit lung cancer progression in high-risk COPD patients.

 
 
 
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