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Articles by R Zhou
Total Records ( 6 ) for R Zhou
  X Li , C Dong , S Shi , G Wang , Y Li , X Wang , Q Shi , C Tian , R Zhou , C Gao and X. Dong
 

Prion protein (PrP) is considered to associate with microtubule and its major component, tubulin. In the present study, octarepeat region of PrP (PrP51–91) was expressed in prokaryotic-expressing system. Using GST pull-down assay and co-immunoprecipitation, the molecular interaction between PrP51–91 and tubulin was observed. Our data also demonstrated that PrP51–91 could efficiently stimulate microtubule assembly in vitro, indicating a potential effect of PrP on microtubule dynamics. Moreover, PrP51–91 was confirmed to be able to antagonize Cu2+-induced microtubule-disrupting activity in vivo, partially protecting against Cu2+ intoxication to culture cells and stabilize cellular microtubule structure. The association of the octarepeat region of PrP with tubulin may further provide insight into the biological function of PrP in the neurons.

  H Bao , H Guo , J Wang , R Zhou , X Lu and S. Shi
 

Summary: We introduce a new visual analytics tool named MapView to facilitate the representation of large-scale short reads alignment data and genetic variation analysis. MapView can handle hundreds of millions of short reads on a desktop computer with limited memory. It supports a compact alignment view for both single-end and paired end short reads, multiple navigation and zoom modes and multi-thread processing. Moreover, MapView offers automated genetic variation detection. MapView has been used in our lab and by over 10 research labs worldwide.

Availability: http://evolution.sysu.edu.cn/mapview/.

Contact: baohua100@hotmail.com; lssssh@mail.sysu.edu.cn

Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at http://evolution.sysu.edu.cn/mapview/MVF.pdf

  S Paul , A. J DeCastro , H. J Lee , A. K Smolarek , J. Y So , B Simi , C. X Wang , R Zhou , A. M Rimando and N. Suh
 

Stilbenes are phytochemicals present in grapes, berries, peanuts and red wine. A widely studied stilbene, resveratrol (trans-3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene), has been shown to exert antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, chemopreventive and antiaging effects in a number of biological systems. We reported earlier that pterostilbene (trans-3,5-dimethoxy-4'-hydroxystilbene), a structurally related stilbene found in blueberries, was effective in reducing the incidence and multiplicity of aberrant crypt foci formation in the colon of rats injected with azoxymethane (AOM). Our present study was to identify the chemopreventive potential of pterostilbene with colonic tumor formation as an end point and further to evaluate the mechanistic action of pterostilbene during colon carcinogenesis. F344 rats were given two AOM injections subcutaneously when they were 7 and 8 weeks old and continuously fed the control or 40 p.p.m. pterostilbene diet for 45 weeks. Overall analyses indicated that pterostilbene reduced colon tumor multiplicity of non-invasive adenocarcinomas, lowered proliferating cell nuclear antigen and downregulated the expression of β-catenin and cyclin D1. Pterostilbene decreased mucosal levels of the proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-4. Colon tumors from pterostilbene-fed animals showed reduced expression of inflammatory markers as well as nuclear staining for phospho-p65, a key molecule in the nuclear factor-kappaB pathway. In HT-29 cells, pterostilbene reduced the protein levels of β-catenin, cyclin D1 and c-MYC, altered the cellular localization of β-catenin and inhibited the phosphorylation of p65. Our data with pterostilbene in suppressing colon tumorigenesis, cell proliferation as well as key inflammatory markers in vivo and in vitro suggest the potential use of pterostilbene for colon cancer prevention.

  M Vergeer , R Zhou , M. L Bots , R Duivenvoorden , J Koglin , F Akdim , Y. B Mitchel , R Huijgen , A Sapre , E de Groot , E. J. G Sijbrands , R. C Pasternak , C Gagne , A. D Marais , C. M Ballantyne , J. L Isaacsohn , A. F Stalenhoef and J. J. P. Kastelein
  Background—

Until recently, patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH) were considered the best subjects for the assessment of changes in carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) in randomized intervention trials. Our aims were to investigate whether contemporary statin-treated HeFH patients still show accelerated cIMT increase and to assess the impact of statin treatment, before and after random assignment, on atherosclerosis progression.

Methods and Results—

We retrospectively evaluated cIMT change, and prior statin treatment and postbaseline LDL-C change as predictors of cIMT change, in 1513 HeFH patients who were randomly assigned to the statin arms of the early ASAP and more recent RADIANCE 1, CAPTIVATE, and ENHANCE studies. In the 3 recent studies combined, mean cIMT increased at only 33%of the rate of the simvastatin-treated patients in the ASAP study (0.014 mm/2 years [95% confidence interval, –0.0003–0.028] versus 0.041 mm/2 years [95% confidence interval, 0.020–0.061]; P<0.05). Patients whose statin therapy could be intensified, as evidenced by an LDL-C decrease after the initiation of on-trial statin therapy, showed cIMT decrease in the first 6 to 12 months and a much lower cIMT increase measured over the full 2 years. In line with this, previously statin-naive HeFH patients showed a lower overall cIMT increase.

Conclusions—

Over the years, intensification of statin therapy in HeFH patients has resulted in an impressive decrease in carotid atherosclerosis progression. In studies that assess other antiatherosclerotic modalities, statin therapy may still induce rapid changes in cIMT. For future cIMT studies, our analyses suggest that patient populations other than intensively pretreated HeFH patients should be selected and that the statin regimen should not be changed on study initiation.

  L Zhu , J Crothers , R Zhou and J. G. Forte
 

Ezrin is an important membrane/actin cytoskeleton linker protein, especially in epithelia. Ezrin has two important binding domains: an NH2-terminal region that binds to plasma membrane and a COOH-terminal region that binds to F-actin only after a conformational activation by phosphorylation at Thr567 of ezrin. The present experiments were undertaken to investigate the detailed cellular changes in the time course of expression of ezrin-T567 mutants (nonphosphorylatable T567A and permanent phospho-mimic T567D) in parietal cells and to assess ezrin distribution and its influence on the elaborate membrane recruitment processes of these cells. T567A mutant and wild-type (WT) ezrin were consistently localized to the apical plasma membrane, even with overexpression. On the other hand, T567D went first to apical membrane at early times and low expression levels, then accumulated mainly at the basal surface after 24 h. Overexpression of WT or T567A led to incorporation of internal membranes to apical vacuoles, while overexpression of T567D led to large incorporation of apical and intracellular membranes (including H-K-ATPase) to the basal surface. Differences in polar distribution of ezrin suggest a role for the linker protein in promoting formation and plasticity of membrane surface projections, forming the basis for a novel theory for ezrin as an organizer and regulator of membrane recruitment. A model simulating the cellular distribution of ezrin and its associated membrane- and F-actin-binding forms is given to predict redistributions observed with phosphorylation and mutant overexpression, and it can easily be modified as more specific information regarding binding constants and specific sites becomes available.

 
 
 
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