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Articles by R Suzuki
Total Records ( 5 ) for R Suzuki
  T Kodama , N Tomita , S Horie , N Sax , H Iwasaki , R Suzuki , K Maruyama , S Mori and F. Manabu
 

Sonoporation is achieved by ultrasound-mediated destruction of ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) microbubbles. For this, UCAs must be tissue specific and have good echogenicity and also function as drug carriers. Previous studies have developed acoustic liposomes (ALs), liposomes that encapsulate phosphate buffer solution and perfluoropropane (C3F8) gas and function as both UCAs and drug carriers. Few studies have examined the co-existence of gas and liquid in ALs. This study aims to elucidate AL structure using TEM. The size, zeta potential and structure of ALs were compared with those of two other UCAs, human albumin shell bubbles (ABs; Optison) and lipid bubbles (LBs). ABs and LBs encapsulate the C3F8 gas. Particle size was measured by dynamic light scattering. The zeta potential was determined by the Smoluchowski equation. UCA structure was investigated by TEM. ALs were ~200 nm in size, smaller than LBs and ABs. ALs and LBs had almost neutral zeta potentials whereas AB values were strongly negative. The negative or double staining TEM images revealed that ~20% of ALs contained both liquid and gas, while ~80% contained liquid alone (i.e. nonacoustic). Negative staining AB images indicated electron beam scattering near the shell surface, and albumin was detected in filament form. These findings suggest that AL is capable of carrying drugs and high-molecular-weight, low-solubility gases.

  M Li , Y Seki , P. H. L Freitas , M Nagata , T Kojima , S Sultana , S Ubaidus , T Maeda , J Shimomura , J. E Henderson , M Tamura , K Oda , Z Liu , Y Guo , R Suzuki , T Yamamoto , R Takagi and N. Amizuka
 

The signaling axis comprising the parathyroid hormone (PTH)-related peptide (PTHrP), the PTH/PTHrP receptor and the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) plays a central role in chondrocyte proliferation. The Indian hedgehog (IHH) gene is normally expressed in early hypertrophic chondrocytes, and its negative feedback loop was shown to regulate PTH/PTHrP receptor signaling. In this study, we examined the regulation of PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression in a FGFR3-transfected chondrocytic cell line, CFK2. Expression of IHH could not be verified on these cells, with consequent absence of hypertrophic differentiation. Also, expression of the PTH/PTHrP receptor (75% reduction of total mRNA) and the PTHrP (50% reduction) genes was reduced in CFK2 cells transfected with FGFR3 cDNA. Interestingly, we verified significant reduction in cell growth and increased apoptosis in the transfected cells. STAT1 was detected in the nuclei of the CFK2 cells transfected with FGFR3 cDNA, indicating predominance of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway. The reduction in PTH/PTHrP receptor gene in CFK2 cells overexpressing FGFR3 was partially blocked by treatment with an inhibitor of JAK3 (WHI-P131), but not with an inhibitor of MAPK (SB203580) or JAK2 (AG490). Altogether, these findings suggest that FGFR3 down-regulates PTH/PTHrP receptor gene expression via the JAK/STAT signaling in chondrocytic cells.

  K Narimatsu , M Li , P. H. L de Freitas , S Sultana , S Ubaidus , T Kojima , L Zhucheng , G Ying , R Suzuki , T Yamamoto , K Oda and N. Amizuka
 

Preosteoblasts are currently defined as the precursors of mature osteoblasts. These cells are morphologically diverse and may represent a continuum during osteoblast differentiation. We have attempted to categorize the different preosteoblastic phenotypes in vivo by examining bone cells expressing the runt-related transcription factor 2, alkaline phosphatase and BrdU incorporation – histological traits of a preosteoblast – under transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM observations demonstrated, at least, in part two preosteoblastic subtypes: (i) a cell rich in cisterns of rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) with vesicles and vacuoles and (ii) a subtype featuring extended cytoplasmic processes that connect with distant cells, with a small amount of scattered cisterns of rER and with many vesicles and vacuoles. ER-rich cells, whose cellular machinery is similar to that of an osteoblast, were often seen adjacent to mature osteoblasts, and therefore, may be ready for terminal differentiation. In contrast, ER-poor and vesicle-rich cells extended their cytoplasmic processes to mature osteoblasts and, frequently, to bone-resorbing osteoclasts. The abundant vesicles and vacuoles identified in this cell type indicate that this cell is involved in vesicular transport rather than matrix synthesis activity. In summary, our study verified the morphological diversity and the ultrastructural properties of osteoblastic cells in vivo.

  R Suzuki , Z Fujimoto , S Ito , S. I Kawahara , S Kaneko , K Taira , T Hasegawa and A. Kuno
 

Retaining glycosyl hydrolases, which catalyse both glycosylation and deglycosylation in a concerted manner, are the most abundant hydrolases. To date, their visualization has tended to be focused on glycosylation because glycosylation reactions can be visualized by inactivating deglycosylation step and/or using substrate analogues to isolate covalent intermediates. Furthermore, during structural analyses of glycosyl hydrolases with hydrolytic reaction products by the conventional soaking method, mutarotation of an anomeric carbon in the reaction products promptly and certainly occurs. This undesirable structural alteration hinders visualization of the second step in the reaction. Here, we investigated X-ray crystallographic visualization as a possible method for visualizing the conformational itinerary of a retaining xylanase from Streptomyces olivaceoviridis E-86. To clearly define the stereochemistry at the anomeric carbon during the deglycosylation step, extraneous nucleophiles, such as azide, were adopted to substitute for the missing base catalyst in an appropriate mutant. The X-ray crystallographic visualization provided snapshots of the components of the entire reaction, including the E•S complex, the covalent intermediate, breakdown of the intermediate and the enzyme–product (E•P)complex.

  R Suzuki , T Katayama , M Kitaoka , H Kumagai , T Wakagi , H Shoun , H Ashida , K Yamamoto and S. Fushinobu
 

Endo--N-acetylgalactosaminidase (endo--GalNAc-ase), a member of the glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 101, hydrolyses the O-glycosidic bonds in mucin-type O-glycan between -GalNAc and Ser/Thr. Endo--GalNAc-ase from Bifidobacterium longum JCM1217 (EngBF) is highly specific for the core 1-type O-glycan to release the disaccharide Galβ1-3GalNAc (GNB), whereas endo--GalNAc-ase from Clostridium perfringens (EngCP) exhibits broader substrate specificity. We determined the crystal structure of EngBF at 2.0 Å resolution and performed automated docking analysis to investigate possible binding modes of GNB. Mutational analysis revealed important residues for substrate binding, and two Trp residues (Trp748 and Trp750) appeared to form stacking interactions with the β-faces of sugar rings of GNB by substrate-induced fit. The difference in substrate specificities between EngBF and EngCP is attributed to the variations in amino acid sequences in the regions forming the substrate-binding pocket. Our results provide a structural basis for substrate recognition by GH101 endo--GalNAc-ases and will help structure-based engineering of these enzymes to produce various kinds of neo-glycoconjugates.

 
 
 
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