Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by R Natarajan
Total Records ( 2 ) for R Natarajan
  H. J Bogaard , R Natarajan , S. C Henderson , C. S Long , D Kraskauskas , L Smithson , R Ockaili , J. M McCord and N. F. Voelkel
 

Background— The most important determinant of longevity in pulmonary arterial hypertension is right ventricular (RV) function, but in contrast to experimental work elucidating the pathobiology of left ventricular failure, there is a paucity of data on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of RV failure.

Methods and Results— A mechanical animal model of chronic progressive RV pressure overload (pulmonary artery banding, not associated with structural alterations of the lung circulation) was compared with an established model of angioproliferative pulmonary hypertension associated with fatal RV failure. Isolated RV pressure overload induced RV hypertrophy without failure, whereas in the context of angioproliferative pulmonary hypertension, RV failure developed that was associated with myocardial apoptosis, fibrosis, a decreased RV capillary density, and a decreased vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA and protein expression despite increased nuclear stabilization of hypoxia-induced factor-1. Induction of myocardial nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 and heme-oxygenase 1 with a dietary supplement (Protandim) prevented fibrosis and capillary loss and preserved RV function despite continuing pressure overload.

Conclusion— These data brought into question the commonly held concept that RV failure associated with pulmonary hypertension is due strictly to the increased RV afterload.

  T Dai , M Patel Chamberlin , R Natarajan , I Todorov , J Ma , J LaPage , L Phillips , C. C Nast , D Becerra , P Chuang , L Tong , J de Belleroche , D. J Wells , Y Wang and S. G. Adler
 

β-Cell apoptosis occurs in diabetes mellitus (DM). Heat shock protein (HSP) 27 (human homolog of rodent HSP25) mitigates stress-induced apoptosis but has not been studied in β-cells. We tested whether HSP27 overexpression attenuates streptozotocin (SZ)-induced DM in vivo and cytokine-induced islet apoptosis in vitro. DM was ascertained by ip glucose tolerance testing, and fasting serum insulin/glucose was measured. Pancreas was stained for insulin, HSP27, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling, and insulin content was measured. HSP25/27 was measured by immunoblotting, isoelectric focusing, and RT-PCR. Islet HSP25/27 oligomerization and inhibitory B protein kinase (nuclear factor B essential modulator) binding were assessed by coimmunoprecipitation. HSP27 transgene (TG) in pancreas localized predominantly in β-cells. Baseline pancreatic insulin levels in wild-type (WT) and HSP27TG mice were similar, but lower in WT than HSP27TG after SZ (P < 0.01). Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance testing confirmed protection from SZ-DM in HSP27TG. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling and inducible nitric oxide synthase staining were increased in WT vs. HSP27TG islets (P < 0.05) after SZ. Caspase-3 activity was lower in islets from HSP27TG vs. WT mice after cytokine stress in vitro (P < 0.05). There was more HSP25 plus 27 protein from HSP27TG islets than HSP25 from WT (P < 0.01). HSP25 protein but not mRNA was increased in HSP27TG mice. Isoelectric focusing showed similar relative HSP phosphorylation in HSP27TG and WT (P > 0.05). HSP27 bound native HSP25 in TG islets; both bound to inhibitory B protein kinase (nuclear factor B essential modulator). These data show islet protection by HSP27 by mitigation of apoptosis, possibly through nuclear factor B regulation.

 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility