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Articles by R Li
Total Records ( 13 ) for R Li
  H Zhou , Y Xiao , R Li , S Hong , S Li , L Wang , R Zeng and K. Liao
 

Adipocyte is not only a central player involved in storage and release of energy, but also in regulation of energy metabolism in other organs via secretion of peptides and proteins. During the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, adipocytes are subjected to the increased levels of insulin, which may have a major impact on the secretion of adipokines. We have undertaken cleavable isotope-coded affinity tag (cICAT) and label-free quantitation approaches to identify and quantify secretory factors that are differentially secreted by 3T3-L1 adipocytes with or without insulin treatment. Combination of cICAT and label-free results, there are 317 proteins predicted or annotated as secretory proteins. Among these secretory proteins, 179 proteins and 53 proteins were significantly up-regulated and down-regulated, respectively. A total of 77 reported adipokines were quantified in our study, such as adiponectin, cathepsin D, cystatin C, resistin, and transferrin. Western blot analysis of these adipokines confirmed the quantitative results from mass spectrometry, and revealed individualized secreting patterns of these proteins by increasing insulin dose. In addition, 240 proteins were newly identified and quantified as secreted proteins from 3T3-L1 adipocytes in our study, most of which were up-regulated upon insulin treatment. Further comprehensive bioinformatics analysis revealed that the secretory proteins in extracellular matrix-receptor interaction pathway and glycan structure degradation pathway were significantly up-regulated by insulin stimulation.

  Y Wang , L Tao , Y Yuan , W. B Lau , R Li , B. L Lopez , T. A Christopher , R Tian and X. L. Ma
 

Adiponectin (APN) exerts its metabolic regulation largely through AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). However, the role of AMPK in APN's antiapoptotic effect in ischemic-reperfused (I/R) adult cardiomyocytes remains incompletely understood. The present study was designed to determine the involvement of AMPK in the antiapoptotic signaling of APN. Cardiomyocytes from adult male mice overexpressing a dominant-negative 2-subunit of AMPK (AMPK-DN) or wild-type (WT) littermates were subjected to simulated I/R (SI/R) and pretreated with 2 µg/ml globular domain of APN (gAPN) or vehicle. SI/R-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis was modestly increased in AMPK-DN cardiomyocytes (P < 0.05). Treatment with gAPN significantly reduced SI/R-induced apoptosis in WT cardiomyocytes as well as in AMPK-DN cardiomyocytes, indicating that the antiapoptotic effect of gAPN is partially AMPK independent. Furthermore, gAPN-induced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation was significantly reduced in AMPK-DN cardiomyocytes, suggesting that the APN-eNOS signaling axis is impaired in AMPK-DN cardiomyocytes. Additional experiments demonstrated that treatment of AMPK-DN cardiomyocytes with gAPN reduced SI/R-induced NADPH oxidase overexpression, decreased superoxide generation, and blocked peroxynitrite formation to the same extent as that observed in WT cardiomyocytes. Collectively, our present study demonstrated that although the metabolic and eNOS activation effect of APN is largely mediated by AMPK, the superoxide-suppressing effect of APN is not mediated by AMPK, and this AMPK-independent antioxidant property of APN increased nitric oxide bioavailability and exerted significant antiapoptotic effect.

  Y Wang , W. B Lau , E Gao , L Tao , Y Yuan , R Li , X Wang , W. J Koch and X. L. Ma
 

Adiponectin (APN) has traditionally been viewed as an adipocyte-specific endocrine molecule with cardioprotective effects. Recent studies suggest that APN is also expressed in cardiomyocytes. However, biological significances of this locally produced APN remain completely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the pathological and pharmacological significance of cardiac-derived APN in cardiomyocyte pathology. Adult cardiomyocytes from wild-type littermates (WT) or gene-deficient mice were pretreated with vehicle (V) or rosiglitazone (RSG) for 6 h followed by simulated ischemia-reperfusion (SI/R, 3 h/12 h). Compared with WT cardiomyocytes, myocytes from APN knockout (APN-KO) mice sustained greater SI/R injury, evidenced by greater oxidative/nitrative stress, caspase-3 activity, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release (P < 0.05). Myocytes from adiponectin receptor 1 knockdown (AdipoR1-KD) or AdipoR1-KD/AdipoR2-KO mice had slightly increased SI/R injury, but the difference was not statistically significant. RSG significantly (P < 0.01) increased APN mRNA and protein expression, upregulated AdipoR1/AdipoR2 expression, reduced SI/R-induced apoptosis, and decreased LDH release in WT cardiomyocytes. However, the anti-oxidative/anti-nitrative and cell protective effects of RSG were completely lost in APN-KO cardiomyocytes (P > 0.05 vs. vehicle group), although a comparable degree of AdipoR1/AdipoR2 upregulation was observed. The upregulatory effect of RSG on APN mRNA and protein expression was significantly potentiated in AdipoR1-KD/AdipoR2-KO cardiomyocytes. However, the cellular protective effects of RSG were significantly blunted, although not completely lost, in these cells. These results demonstrated that cardiomyocyte APN is biologically active in protecting cells against SI/R injury. Moreover, this locally produced APN achieves its protective effect primarily through paracrine/autocrine activation of APN receptors.

  A. R Sanders , D. F Levinson , J Duan , J. M Dennis , R Li , K. S Kendler , J. P Rice , J Shi , B. J Mowry , F Amin , J. M Silverman , N. G Buccola , W. F Byerley , D. W Black , R Freedman , C. R Cloninger and P. V. Gejman
  Objective

The Molecular Genetics of Schizophrenia (MGS2) project recruited an adult control sample of non-Hispanic European-ancestry (N=3,364) and African American (N=1,301) subjects.

Method

Subjects gave consent to deposit phenotypic data and blood samples into a repository for general research use, with full anonymization of the sample. The authors compared the control sample with population census data for demographic data and with previous population surveys for anthropometrics and prevalences of psychiatric disorders as estimated by an Internet-administered questionnaire.

Results

The full MGS2 control sample includes 4,665 subjects (European-ancestry: N=3,364; African American: N=1,301), of whom 3,626 were included in the MGS2 genome-wide association study (GWAS). The sample is generally demographically representative of the U.S. population, except for being older and more female, educated, and affluent, although all strata are represented. Self-reported ancestry was consistent with genotypic and census data. Lifetime prevalences for depressive, anxiety, and substance use diagnoses were higher than in previous population-based surveys, probably due to use of an abbreviated self-report instrument. However, patterns such as sex ratios, comorbidity, and demographic associations were consistent with previous reports. DNA quality for the Internet collected/evaluated control sample was comparable to that of the face-to-face case sample.

Conclusions

The Internet-based methods facilitated the rapid collection of large and anonymized non-Hispanic European-ancestry and African American control samples that have been validated as being generally representative for many aspects of demography, ancestry, and morbidity. Utilization of clinical screening data shared with the scientific community may permit investigators to select appropriate controls for some studies.

  R Li , C Yu , Y Li , T. W Lam , S. M Yiu , K Kristiansen and J. Wang
 

Summary: SOAP2 is a significantly improved version of the short oligonucleotide alignment program that both reduces computer memory usage and increases alignment speed at an unprecedented rate. We used a Burrows Wheeler Transformation (BWT) compression index to substitute the seed strategy for indexing the reference sequence in the main memory. We tested it on the whole human genome and found that this new algorithm reduced memory usage from 14.7 to 5.4 GB and improved alignment speed by 20–30 times. SOAP2 is compatible with both single- and paired-end reads. Additionally, this tool now supports multiple text and compressed file formats. A consensus builder has also been developed for consensus assembly and SNP detection from alignment of short reads on a reference genome.

  Y Adachi , R Li , H Yamamoto , Y Min , W Piao , Y Wang , A Imsumran , H Li , Y Arimura , C. T Lee , K Imai , D. P Carbone and Y. Shinomura
 

Insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) signaling is required for carcinogenicity and proliferation of gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. We have previously shown significant therapeutic activity for recombinant adenoviruses expressing dominant-negative insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR/dn), including suppression of tumor invasion. In this study, we sought to evaluate the mechanism of inhibition of invasion and the relationship between IGF-IR and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity in GI carcinomas. We analyzed the role of IGF-IR on invasion in three GI cancer cell lines, colorectal adenocarcinoma, HT29; pancreatic adenocarcinoma, BxPC3 and gastric adenocarcinoma, MKN45, using a modified Boyden chamber method and subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice. The impact of IGF-IR signaling on the expression of MMPs and the effects of blockade of matrilysin or IGF-IR on invasiveness were assessed using recombinant adenoviruses, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 and antisense matrilysin. Invasive subcutaneous tumors expressed several MMPs. IGF-IR/dn reduced the expression of these MMPs but especially matrilysin (MMP-7). Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) stimulated secretion of matrilysin and IGF-IR/dn blocked IGF-mediated matrilysin induction in three GI cancers. Both IGF-IR/dn and inhibition of matrilysin reduced in vitro invasion to the same degree. NVP-AEW541 also reduced cancer cell invasion both in vitro and in murine xenograft tumors via suppression of matrilysin. Thus, blockade of IGF-IR is involved in the suppression of cancer cell invasion through downregulation of matrilysin. Strategies of targeting IGF-IR may have significant therapeutic utility to prevent invasion and progression of human GI carcinomas.

  S Li , Y Sun , C. P Liang , E. B Thorp , S Han , A. W Jehle , V Saraswathi , B Pridgen , J. E Kanter , R Li , C. L Welch , A. H Hasty , K. E Bornfeldt , J. L Breslow , I Tabas and A. R. Tall
 

Rationale: The complications of atherosclerosis are a major cause of death and disability in type 2 diabetes. Defective clearance of apoptotic cells by macrophages (efferocytosis) is thought to lead to increased necrotic core formation and inflammation in atherosclerotic lesions.

Objective: To determine whether there is defective efferocytosis in a mouse model of obesity and atherosclerosis.

Methods and Results: We quantified efferocytosis in peritoneal macrophages and in atherosclerotic lesions of obese ob/ob or ob/ob;Ldlr–/– mice and littermate controls. Peritoneal macrophages from ob/ob and ob/ob;Ldlr–/– mice showed impaired efferocytosis, reflecting defective phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation during uptake of apoptotic cells. Membrane lipid composition of ob/ob and ob/ob;Ldlr–/– macrophages showed an increased content of saturated fatty acids (FAs) and decreased -3 FAs (eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid) compared to controls. A similar defect in efferocytosis was induced by treating control macrophages with saturated free FA/BSA complexes, whereas the defect in ob/ob macrophages was reversed by treatment with eicosapentaenoic acid/BSA or by feeding ob/ob mice a fish oil diet rich in -3 FAs. There was also defective macrophage efferocytosis in atherosclerotic lesions of ob/ob;Ldlr–/– mice and this was reversed by a fish oil–rich diet.

Conclusions: The findings suggest that in obesity and type 2 diabetes elevated levels of saturated FAs and/or decreased levels of -3 FAs contribute to decreased macrophage efferocytosis. Beneficial effects of fish oil diets in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease may involve improvements in macrophage function related to reversal of defective efferocytosis and could be particularly important in type 2 diabetes and obesity.

  C Cluett , M. M McDermott , J Guralnik , L Ferrucci , S Bandinelli , I Miljkovic , J. M Zmuda , R Li , G Tranah , T Harris , N Rice , W Henley , T. M Frayling , A Murray and D. Melzer
 

Background— A common variant at chromosome 9p21 (tagged by the rs1333049 or rs10757278 single-nucleotide polymorphism) is strongly associated with myocardial infarction and major arterial aneurysms. An association with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) was also reported in a sample younger than 75 years, but this disappeared on removal of respondents with a myocardial infarction history, resulting in an odds ratio of 1.09 for PAD (P=0.075). We aimed at estimating the association of this variant with an Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) and PAD in 3 older populations.

Methods and Results— We used data from the InCHIANTI, Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, and Health, Aging, and Body Composition studies. In 2630 white individuals (mean age, 76.4 years), the C allele at rs1333049 was associated with lower mean ABI measures and with an increased prevalence of PAD. These associations remained after removal of baseline and incident myocardial infarction cases over a 6-year follow-up for both ABI (–0.017 ABI units; 95% CI, –0.03 to –0.01; P=1.3x10–4) and PAD (per allele odds ratio, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.56; P=0.012). These associations also remained after adjustment for known atherosclerosis risk factors, including diabetes mellitus, smoking, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension.

Conclusions— The C allele at rs1333049 is associated with an increased prevalence of PAD and lower mean ABI. This association was independent of the presence of diagnosed myocardial infarction and atherosclerotic risk factors in 3 older white populations.

  O Dakhova , M Ozen , C. J Creighton , R Li , G Ayala , D Rowley and M. Ittmann
 

Purpose: Marked reactive stroma formation, designated as grade 3 reactive stroma, is associated with poor outcome in clinically localized prostate cancer. To understand the biological processes and signaling mechanisms underlying the formation of such reactive stroma, we carried out microarray gene expression analysis of laser-captured reactive stroma and matched normal stroma.

Experimental Design: Seventeen cases of reactive stroma grade 3 cancer were used to laser-capture tumor and normal stroma. Expression analysis was carried out using Agilent 44K arrays. Up-regulation of selected genes was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Expression data was analyzed to identify significantly up- and down-regulated genes, and gene ontology analysis was used to define pathways altered in reactive stroma.

Results: A total of 544 unique genes were significantly higher in the reactive stroma and 606 unique genes were lower. Gene ontology analysis revealed significant alterations in a number of novel processes in prostate cancer reactive stroma, including neurogenesis, axonogenesis, and the DNA damage/repair pathways, as well as evidence of increases in stem cells in prostate cancer reactive stroma.

Conclusions: Formation of reactive stroma in prostate cancer is a dynamic process characterized by significant alterations in growth factor and signal transduction pathways and formation of new structures, including nerves and axons.

  H Wang , R Li and Y. Hu
 

Aromatase (Cyp19) is a key enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis and an important target in endocrine therapy for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive postmenopausal breast cancer. Aromatase transcription is driven by multiple tissue-specific promoters, which result in the production of various mRNA transcripts that contain an alternative noncoding exon 1 followed by a common protein-coding region. Transcriptional activity of these promoters is the only known determinant for aromatase protein abundance in a given tissue or cellular context. To determine whether aromatase expression could be influenced by additional regulatory mechanisms, we used a common heterologous promoter to drive the expression of multiple aromatase cDNA sequences that differ only by the alternative exon 1 sequence. These expression vectors gave rise to vastly different levels of aromatase mRNA and protein in multiple cell lines examined. Furthermore, the relative abundance of several mRNA variants did not correlate with that of the corresponding protein product. The variation in mRNA and protein levels is most likely due to a negative effect of certain alternative exons 1 on RNA stability and protein translation. Deletional analyses indicate that the 5' regions of the adipose tissue-specific exons I.3 and I.4 contain the cis-acting elements responsible for modulation of aromatase levels. Thus, our work uncovers an important role of the alternative exons 1 in posttranscriptional regulation of aromatase gene expression.

  R Li , Y Li , X Fang , H Yang , J Wang , K Kristiansen and J. Wang
 

Next-generation massively parallel sequencing technologies provide ultrahigh throughput at two orders of magnitude lower unit cost than capillary Sanger sequencing technology. One of the key applications of next-generation sequencing is studying genetic variation between individuals using whole-genome or target region resequencing. Here, we have developed a consensus-calling and SNP-detection method for sequencing-by-synthesis Illumina Genome Analyzer technology. We designed this method by carefully considering the data quality, alignment, and experimental errors common to this technology. All of this information was integrated into a single quality score for each base under Bayesian theory to measure the accuracy of consensus calling. We tested this methodology using a large-scale human resequencing data set of 36x coverage and assembled a high-quality nonrepetitive consensus sequence for 92.25% of the diploid autosomes and 88.07% of the haploid X chromosome. Comparison of the consensus sequence with Illumina human 1M BeadChip genotyped alleles from the same DNA sample showed that 98.6% of the 37,933 genotyped alleles on the X chromosome and 98% of 999,981 genotyped alleles on autosomes were covered at 99.97% and 99.84% consistency, respectively. At a low sequencing depth, we used prior probability of dbSNP alleles and were able to improve coverage of the dbSNP sites significantly as compared to that obtained using a nonimputation model. Our analyses demonstrate that our method has a very low false call rate at any sequencing depth and excellent genome coverage at a high sequencing depth.

  G Zhang , G Guo , X Hu , Y Zhang , Q Li , R Li , R Zhuang , Z Lu , Z He , X Fang , L Chen , W Tian , Y Tao , K Kristiansen , X Zhang , S Li , H Yang , J Wang and J. Wang
 

Understanding the dynamics of eukaryotic transcriptome is essential for studying the complexity of transcriptional regulation and its impact on phenotype. However, comprehensive studies of transcriptomes at single base resolution are rare, even for modern organisms, and lacking for rice. Here, we present the first transcriptome atlas for eight organs of cultivated rice. Using high-throughput paired-end RNA-seq, we unambiguously detected transcripts expressing at an extremely low level, as well as a substantial number of novel transcripts, exons, and untranslated regions. An analysis of alternative splicing in the rice transcriptome revealed that alternative cis-splicing occurred in ~33% of all rice genes. This is far more than previously reported. In addition, we also identified 234 putative chimeric transcripts that seem to be produced by trans-splicing, indicating that transcript fusion events are more common than expected. In-depth analysis revealed a multitude of fusion transcripts that might be by-products of alternative splicing. Validation and chimeric transcript structural analysis provided evidence that some of these transcripts are likely to be functional in the cell. Taken together, our data provide extensive evidence that transcriptional regulation in rice is vastly more complex than previously believed.

  R Li , A Maminishkis , T Banzon , Q Wan , S Jalickee , S Chen and S. S. Miller
 

The present experiments show that IFN receptors are mainly localized to the basolateral membrane of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Activation of these receptors in primary cultures of human fetal RPE inhibited cell proliferation and migration, decreased RPE mitochondrial membrane potential, altered transepithelial potential and resistance, and significantly increased transepithelial fluid absorption. These effects are mediated through JAK-STAT and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. Second messenger signaling through cAMP-PKA pathway- and interferon regulatory factor-1-dependent production of nitric oxide/cGMP stimulated the CFTR at the basolateral membrane and increased transepithelial fluid absorption. In vivo experiments using a rat model of retinal reattachment showed that IFN applied to the anterior surface of the eye can remove extra fluid deposited in the extracellular or subretinal space between the retinal photoreceptors and RPE. Removal of this extra fluid was blocked by a combination of PKA and JAK-STAT pathway inhibitors injected into the subretinal space. These results demonstrate a protective role for IFN in regulating retinal hydration across the outer blood-retinal barrier in inflammatory disease processes and provide the basis for possible therapeutic interventions.

 
 
 
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