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Articles by R Katz
Total Records ( 2 ) for R Katz
  C Robinson Cohen , R Katz , D Mozaffarian , L. S Dalrymple , I de Boer , M Sarnak , M Shlipak , D Siscovick and B. Kestenbaum
 

Background  Habitual physical activity (PA) has both physiologic and metabolic effects that may moderate the risk of kidney function decline. We tested the hypothesis that higher levels of PA are associated with a lower risk of kidney function decline using longitudinal data from a large cohort of older adults.

Methods  We studied 4011 ambulatory participants aged 65 or older from the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) who completed at least 2 measurements of kidney function over 7 years. We calculated a PA score (range, 2-8) by summing kilocalories expended per week (ordinal score of 1-5 from quintiles of kilocalories per week) and walking pace (ordinal score for categories of <2, 2-3, and >3 mph). Rapid decline in kidney function decline (RDKF) was defined by loss of more than 3.0 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year in glomerular filtration rate, which we estimated by using longitudinal measurements of cystatin C levels.

Results  A total of 958 participants had RDKF (23.9%; 4.1 events per 100 person-years). The estimated risk of RDKF was 16% in the highest PA group (score of 8) and 30% in the lowest PA group (score of 2). After multivariate adjustment, we found that the 2 highest PA groups (scores of 7-8) were associated with a 28% lower risk of RDKF (95% confidence interval, 21%-41% lower risk) than the 2 lowest PA groups (score of 2-3). Greater kilocalories of leisure-time PA and walking pace were also each associated with a lower incidence of RDKF.

Conclusion  Higher levels of PA are associated with a lower risk of RDKF among older adults.

  R Deo , N Sotoodehnia , R Katz , M. J Sarnak , L. F Fried , M Chonchol , B Kestenbaum , B. M Psaty , D. S Siscovick and M. G. Shlipak
 

Background— Recent studies have demonstrated an association between moderate kidney dysfunction and sudden cardiac death in people with cardiovascular disease.

Methods and Results— The study was a longitudinal analysis among 4465 participants from the Cardiovascular Health Study without prevalent cardiovascular disease at baseline. Cystatin C and creatinine were measured from baseline sera. Sudden cardiac death (SCD) was defined as a sudden pulseless condition from a cardiac origin in a previously stable individual that occurred out of the hospital or in the emergency room. The association between cystatin C tertiles and SCD was determined with multivariate Cox proportional hazards. A similar analysis compared SCD incidence across creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) tertiles. Over a median follow-up of 11.2 years, 91 adjudicated SCD events occurred. The annual incidence of SCD events increased across cystatin C tertiles: 10 events per 10 000 person years in tertile 1, 25 events per 10 000 person years in tertile 2, and 32 events per 10 000 person-years in the highest cystatin C tertile. These associations persisted after multivariate adjustment: hazards ratio=2.72; 95% confidence interval, 1.44 to 5.16 in tertile 2 and hazards ratio=2.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.33 to 5.35 in tertile 3. After multivariate adjustment, the rate of SCD also increased in a linear distribution across creatinine-based eGFR tertiles: 15 events per 10 000 person-years in tertile 1, 22 events per 10 000 person-years in tertile 2, and 27 events per 10 000 person-years in tertile 3. No significant associations, however, remained between creatinine-based eGFR and SCD after multivariable adjustment.

Conclusions— Impaired kidney function, as measured by cystatin C, has an independent association with SCD risk among elderly persons without clinical cardiovascular disease.

 
 
 
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