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Articles by R Jin
Total Records ( 3 ) for R Jin
  S Seedat , K. M Scott , M. C Angermeyer , P Berglund , E. J Bromet , T. S Brugha , K Demyttenaere , G de Girolamo , J. M Haro , R Jin , E. G Karam , V Kovess Masfety , D Levinson , M. E Medina Mora , Y Ono , J Ormel , B. E Pennell , J Posada Villa , N. A Sampson , D Williams and R. C. Kessler
 

Context  Gender differences in mental disorders, including more anxiety and mood disorders among women and more externalizing disorders among men, are found consistently in epidemiological surveys. The gender roles hypothesis suggests that these differences narrow as the roles of women and men become more equal.

Objectives  To study time-space (cohort-country) variation in gender differences in lifetime DSM-IV mental disorders across cohorts in 15 countries in the World Health Organization World Mental Health Survey Initiative and to determine if this variation is significantly related to time-space variation in female gender role traditionality as measured by aggregate patterns of female education, employment, marital timing, and use of birth control.

Design  Face-to-face household surveys.

Setting  Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and the Pacific.

Participants  Community-dwelling adults (N = 72 933).

Main Outcome Measures  The World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview assessed lifetime prevalence and age at onset of 18 DSM-IV anxiety, mood, externalizing, and substance disorders. Survival analyses estimated time-space variation in female to male odds ratios of these disorders across cohorts defined by the following age ranges: 18 to 34, 35 to 49, 50 to 64, and 65 years and older. Structural equation analysis examined predictive effects of variation in gender role traditionality on these odds ratios.

Results  In all cohorts and countries, women had more anxiety and mood disorders than men, and men had more externalizing and substance disorders than women. Although gender differences were generally consistent across cohorts, significant narrowing was found in recent cohorts for major depressive disorder and substance disorders. This narrowing was significantly related to temporal (major depressive disorder) and spatial (substance disorders) variation in gender role traditionality.

Conclusions  While gender differences in most lifetime mental disorders were fairly stable over the time-space units studied, substantial intercohort narrowing of differences in major depression was found to be related to changes in the traditionality of female gender roles. Additional research is needed to understand why this temporal narrowing was confined to major depression.

  X Yang , Y Zhou , R Jin and C. Chan
 

Motivation: Reconstructing gene networks from microarray data has provided mechanistic information on cellular processes. A popular structure learning method, Bayesian network inference, has been used to determine network topology despite its shortcomings, i.e. the high-computational cost when analyzing a large number of genes and the inefficiency in exploiting prior knowledge, such as the co-regulation information of the genes. To address these limitations, we are introducing an alternative method, knowledge-driven matrix factorization (KMF) framework, to reconstruct phenotype-specific modular gene networks.

Results: Considering the reconstruction of gene network as a matrix factorization problem, we first use the gene expression data to estimate a correlation matrix, and then factorize the correlation matrix to recover the gene modules and the interactions between them. Prior knowledge from Gene Ontology is integrated into the matrix factorization. We applied this KMF algorithm to hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells treated with free fatty acids (FFAs). By comparing the module networks for the different conditions, we identified the specific modules that are involved in conferring the cytotoxic phenotype induced by palmitate. Further analysis of the gene modules of the different conditions suggested individual genes that play important roles in palmitate-induced cytotoxicity. In summary, KMF can efficiently integrate gene expression data with prior knowledge, thereby providing a powerful method of reconstructing phenotype-specific gene networks and valuable insights into the mechanisms that govern the phenotype.

  S Lee , A Tsang , R. C Kessler , R Jin , N Sampson , L Andrade , E. G Karam , M. E. M Mora , K Merikangas , Y Nakane , D. G Popovici , J Posada Villa , R Sagar , J. E Wells , Z Zarkov and M. Petukhova
 

Background

The epidemiology of rapid-cycling bipolar disorder in the community is largely unknown.

Aims

To investigate the epidemiological characteristics of rapid-cycling and non-rapid-cycling bipolar disorder in a large cross-national community sample.

Method

The Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI version 3.0) was used to examine the prevalence, severity, comorbidity, impairment, suicidality, sociodemographics, childhood adversity and treatment of rapid-cycling and non-rapid-cycling bipolar disorder in ten countries (n = 54 257).

Results

The 12-month prevalence of rapid-cycling bipolar disorder was 0.3%. Roughly a third and two-fifths of participants with lifetime and 12-month bipolar disorder respectively met criteria for rapid cycling. Compared with the non-rapid-cycling, rapid-cycling bipolar disorder was associated with younger age at onset, higher persistence, more severe depressive symptoms, greater impairment from depressive symptoms, more out-of-role days from mania/hypomania, more anxiety disorders and an increased likelihood of using health services. Associations regarding childhood, family and other sociodemographic correlates were less clear cut.

Conclusions

The community epidemiological profile of rapid-cycling bipolar disorder confirms most but not all current clinically based knowledge about the illness.

 
 
 
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