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Articles by Petar Alaupovic
Total Records ( 3 ) for Petar Alaupovic
  Peter O. Kwiterovich , Donna G. Virgil , Audrey Y. Chu , Victor A. Khouzami , Petar Alaupovic and James D. Otvos
 

Background

Lipoprotein subfractions in infants may predict the risk of cardiovascular disease factors in children.

Objective

To examine the relationships between lipid and nonlipid factors and lipoprotein subfractions in infants at birth and follow-up (FU) and in their parents.

Methods

Prospective study in a community-based hospital of 103 families ascertained through a pregnant mother at 36 weeks gestation or older. Of 103 infants studied at birth, 85 were sampled at FU at 2-3 months of age, along with 76 fathers. Lipids, lipoproteins, and their subclasses were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Correlations of lipid-related parameters were calculated using Spearman rank correlations.

Results

Female gender in infants and use of formula only were the only nonlipid variables associated with lipoprotein subfractions. LDL parameters were significantly correlated between infants at birth and FU. The largest high-density lipoprotein subfraction, H5C, was the only lipid variable significantly associated between mothers and infants at birth. Paternal low-density lipoprotein size was significantly correlated with that of infants at FU but not at birth. In each of the four groups, markedly inverse interrelationships were found between H5C and small LDL particles. At birth and at FU, apoC-I was strongly related with H5C but not TG. Conversely, apoC-I in the parents was strongly related with TG but not H5C.

Conclusion

Significant relationships were found between lipoprotein subfractions within infants at birth and FU and their parents. ApoC-I and H5C levels very early in life may affect the development of dyslipidemia and obesity in childhood.

  Wenyu Wang , Sohail Khan , Piers Blackett , Petar Alaupovic and Elisa Lee
 

Background

Because type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a coronary artery disease risk equivalent, it is important to identify difference in risk markers between cases with T2D and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) compared with those with MetS alone. We evaluated apolipoproteins as possible distinguishing markers in the Oklahoma Cherokee.

Objective

To assess apolipoproteins (apo) A-I, B, and C-III in young adult Cherokee who have the metabolic syndrome (MetS), as defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP), either with or without T2D.

Methods

A cross-sectional comparison of young adult Oklahoma Cherokee, ages 18 to 40 years, was conducted to assess differences in the apolipoproteins caused by the presence or absence of T2D among those with MetS, after we adjusted for age and gender.

Results

ApoA-I (P = .0222) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C; P = .0364) were lower, and apoB (P = .0106) and the apoB to A-I ratio (P < .0001) were greater in participants with the MetS and T2D than in those with MetS but without T2D. However, cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, non-HDL-C, total apoC-III, non-HDL apoC-III and the bimodal lipoprotein distribution of apoC-III (apoC-III ratio) were not significantly different between the two groups.

Conclusion

ApoA-I and HDL-C are lower and apoB and the apoB:A-I ratio are greater in those with MetS and T2D than in those who have the MetS but without T2D, suggesting that the presence of diabetes adversely influences plasma apoA-I and apoB levels. However, apoC-III and non-HDL apoC-III are unchanged by the addition of diabetes suggesting that the increased levels associated with MetS may precede T2D.

  Piers Blackett , Jeanie Tryggestad , Sowmya Krishnan , Shibo Li , Weihong Xu , Petar Alaupovic , Carmen Quiroga and Kenneth Copeland
 

Background

The treatment of familial hyperchylomicronemia presenting in early childhood with episodes of pancreatitis has been ineffective, and affected patients remain at risk for pancreatitis.

Objective

To report on the effect of orlistat in siblings with severe inherited hyperchylomicronemia and to assess posttreatment lipoprotein concentrations and composition.

Methods

Serial observations of plasma lipid levels and hospitalizations after treatment with orlistat and lipoprotein studies on a single fasting posttreatment sample.

Results

The affected siblings inherited a lipoprotein lipase gene mutation from each of their parents: a novel mutation from their father (c.542G > C, p.G181R) and a known missense mutation from their mother (c.644G > A, p.G215E). When the boy presented to us at age 9 years of age and his sister at age 7 years, we found that addition of orlistat, a pancreatic lipase inhibitor, at a dose of 120 mg given before three low-fat meals a day was effective in reducing episodes of pancreatitis in the boy and in maintaining the triglyceride at lower levels in both children. During treatment, the children were observed to have elevations in apolipoprotein (apo)B, low-density lipoprotein particle concentration, abnormal apoB-containing subclasses, and deficiencies in apoA-I and apoA-II-containing lipoproteins, changes consistent with continuing increased cardiovascular risk.

Conclusion

The data support the need for more effective long-term treatments that not only prevent pancreatitis but also offset cardiovascular risk. Orlistat can be considered effective in augmenting the effect of a low-fat diet and reducing risk for pancreatitis.

 
 
 
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