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Articles by Paul Maruff
Total Records ( 4 ) for Paul Maruff
  Zaven S. Khachaturian , Deborah Barnes , Richard Einstein , Sterling Johnson , Virginia Lee , Allen Roses , Mark A. Sager , William R. Shankle , Peter J. Snyder , Ronald C. Petersen , Gerard Schellenberg , John Trojanowski , Paul Aisen , Marilyn S. Albert , John C.S. Breitner , Neil Buckholtz , Maria Carrillo , Steven Ferris , Barry D. Greenberg , Michael Grundman , Ara S. Khachaturian , Lewis H. Kuller , Oscar L. Lopez , Paul Maruff , Richard C. Mohs , Marcelle Morrison- Bogorad , Creighton Phelps , Eric Reiman , Marwan Sabbagh , Mary Sano , Lon S. Schneider , Eric Siemers , Pierre Tariot , Jacques Touchon , Bruno Vellas and Lisa J. Bain
  Among the major impediments to the design of clinical trials for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most critical is the lack of validated biomarkers, assessment tools, and algorithms that would facilitate identification of asymptomatic individuals with elevated risk who might be recruited as study volunteers. Thus, the Leon Thal Symposium 2009 (LTS'09), on October 27–28, 2009 in Las Vegas, Nevada, was convened to explore strategies to surmount the barriers in designing a multisite, comparative study to evaluate and validate various approaches for detecting and selecting asymptomatic people at risk for cognitive disorders/dementia. The deliberations of LTS'09 included presentations and reviews of different approaches (algorithms, biomarkers, or measures) for identifying asymptomatic individuals at elevated risk for AD who would be candidates for longitudinal or prevention studies. The key nested recommendations of LTS'09 included: (1) establishment of a National Database for Longitudinal Studies as a shared research core resource; (2) launch of a large collaborative study that will compare multiple screening approaches and biomarkers to determine the best method for identifying asymptomatic people at risk for AD; (3) initiation of a Global Database that extends the concept of the National Database for Longitudinal Studies for longitudinal studies beyond the United States; and (4) development of an educational campaign that will address public misconceptions about AD and promote healthy brain aging.
  Zaven S. Khachaturian , Ronald C. Petersen , Peter J. Snyder , Ara S. Khachaturian , Paul Aisen , Mony de Leon , Barry D. Greenberg , Walter Kukull , Paul Maruff , Reisa A. Sperling , Yaakov Stern , Jacques Touchon , Bruno Vellas , Sandrine Andrieu , Michael W. Weiner , Maria C. Carrillo and Lisa J. Bain
  The fourth Leon Thal Symposium (LTS2010) was convened in Toulouse, France, on November 3, 2010. This symposium reviewed design parameters that are necessary to develop comprehensive national databases on healthy aging. Such datasets offer the potential to serve as the foundation for a systems-approach to solve the dual public health problems of: (1) early detection of people who are at elevated risk for Alzheimer‘s disease, and (2) the development of interventions to delay onset of, or prevent, late-life dementia. The symposium considered three interrelated components of a National Database for Longitudinal Studies on Healthy Aging as follows: (a) a registry of healthy aging adults; (b) refined computer-based assessments for data gathering, including assessments of behavioral/memory changes associated with aging that are appropriate for broad use in nonexpert settings; and (c) high performance computing/supercomputer-based approaches for health data modeling and mining
  David G. Darby , Robert H. Pietrzak , Julia Fredrickson , Michael Woodward , Lynette Moore , Amy Fredrickson , Jack Sach and Paul Maruff
  Background Progressive intraindividual decline in memory and cognition is characteristic of dementia and may be useful in detecting very early Alzheimer‘s disease pathology. Methods This study evaluated the slopes of cognitive performance over a 12-month period in 263 healthy, community-dwelling, adult volunteers aged ≥50 years. Participants completed a brief computerized battery of cognitive tests (CogState) at baseline and during 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month follow-up assessments. Linear mixed models were used to estimate age-adjusted mean slopes and 95% confidence intervals of change for each of the cognitive measures. Results By defining age-adjusted mean slopes, and 95% confidence intervals for a measure of episodic memory, individuals with greater than expected decline (equal to or lower than the fifth percentile level of decline) were identified. From these, four individuals completed a full medical, neurologic, and neuropsychological evaluation, with none of them fulfilling criteria for mild cognitive impairment, but three (75%) having positive amyloid-positron emission tomographic scans. Conclusions Intraindividual decline in cognitive performance can be detected in otherwise healthy, community-dwelling, older persons, and this may deserve further study as a potential indicator of early Alzheimer‘s disease pathology.
  Maria C. Carrillo , Christopher C. Rowe , Cassandra Szoeke , Colin L. Masters , David Ames , Tim O’Meara , S. Lance Macaulay , Andrew Milner , Kathryn A. Ellis , Paul Maruff , Stephanie R. Rainey- Smith , Ralph N. Martins , Lisa J. Bain and Richard J. Head
  Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an epidemic facing the entire world. Increased knowledge gained during the past 25 years indicates that AD falls along a clinical and neuropathological spectrum represented as a continuum that extends from preclinical disease in which there are no symptoms, through early symptomatic phases, and finally to AD dementia. The Alzheimer's research community recognizes that imaging, body fluids, and cognitive biomarkers contribute to enhanced diagnostic confidence for AD. There has also been emerging consensus regarding the use of AD biomarkers in clinical trials. The use of biomarkers in clinical trials and practice is hampered by the lack of standardization. In response to the emerging need for standardization, an international meeting of AD researchers was held in Melbourne, Australia, in March 2012 to bring together key researchers, clinicians, industry, and regulatory stakeholders with the aim of generating consensus on standardization and validation of cognitive, imaging, and fluid biomarkers, as well as lifestyle parameters used in research centers worldwide.
 
 
 
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