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Articles by P.K. Kar
Total Records ( 3 ) for P.K. Kar
  G. Lokesh , Putkho Paul Pao , K.N. Madhusudhan , P.K. Kar , A.K. Srivastava , M.K. Sinha , R. Manohar Reddy , P.M. Muniswamy Reddy and B.C. Prasad
  The wild silkworm, tropical tasar Antheraea mylitta Drury being mainly culturing in central and eastern parts of India and produces famous tasar silk. This insect species expresses divergent phenotypic characters in response to varying ecological and climatic conditions thus exists as ecoraces. Hence, in the present study, three ecoraces viz., Daba, Sukinda (Semi-domesticated) and Sarihan (wild) have been selected for the assessment of the variability in silk gland related traits. The parameters of the silk glands studied like comparative length, weight and silk gland to larval body mass index. Besides, some biochemical contents of the silk gland tissue were also studied in three ecoraces. The results showed significant variations at p<5% in all the parameters among the three ecoraces studied, also showed the sexual dimorphism in expression of silk gland features and economic traits. The semi-domesticated Daba ecorace showed higher performance in most of the parameters with comparatively greater in silk gland weight (22%) and in body mass index (>16%). Apart from this, wild ecorace Sarihan cocoons showed higher shell ratio (>10% over the value of other ecoraces). The study infers that, there is wide variability in the expression of phenotype with respect to silk gland related traits among the different ecoraces of tropical tasar silkworm A. mylitta. Since the silk glands are site of biosynthesis of silk proteins, these may be considered for the assessment of diversity or characterization of different ecoraces of tropical tasar silkworm.
  R.M. Reddy , M.K. Sinha , K.P.K. Kumar , N.S. Gahlot , A.K. Srivastava , P.K. Kar and B.C. Prasad
  The aim of the present study is to explore hybridization influence to achieve the potential of silk yield and quality in commercial tasarculture, as against the current status of applying only a few wild and semi-domesticated ecoraces of Antheraea mylitta D to produce raw silk during commercial crop rearing season (September-December). The four F1 hybrid combinations generated using Daba, Jata and Raily tasar ecoraces of seed crop rearing season (July-August) were evaluated during commercial crop season of 2007 and 2008 for the influence of hybridization as positive heterosis in the traits of economically important silk productivity and filament denier. The F1 hybrid, Daba x Jata has recorded positive heterosis in single shell weight (+25.6%), total silk yield (+79.0%) and silk filament length (+68.1%), but for silk filament of high denier (11.98 d) followed by its reciprocal hybrid, JataxDaba in shell weight (+18.8%), silk yield (+68.1%), filament length (+63.8%) and filament of highest denier (12.32 d). Though, the RailyxDaba hybrid could show highest heterosis in shell weight (2.47 g) with filament of least denier (10.86 d), the improvement in filament length was marginal (+44.7%) and heterosis in silk yield was negative (-47.0%), while the performance of DabaxRaily hybrid was least among the hybrids. The study infers hybridization influence on silk related traits at F1 level as positive heterosis and the application feasibility of DabaxJata and JataxDaba hybrids during commercial crop rearing season for higher silk productivity with silk filament denier at least better than one of the parents of F1 hybrid combination.
  R. Manohar Reddy , Suresh Rai , A.K. Srivastava , P.K. Kar , M.K. Sinha and B.C. Prasad
  Assorted F1 hybrids and reciprocals of divergent tasar ecoraces of Antheraea mylitta viz., Daba, Jata and Raily were evaluated for relative heterosis. The DabaxJata [R] (random female and male) and its reciprocal hybrids have recorded high positive heterosis for fecundity (+17.45 and +1.70%), egg fertility (+11.58 and +7.20%), shell weight (+34.76 and +27.44%), silk ratio (+30.49 and +24.15%) and silk yields (+94.33 and +82.51%), respectively. Dabax Jata [PxS] (high pupal female and high shell male) hybrid, although recorded positive heterosis for all traits, but was next to random parental hybrids. The DabaxJata [PxP] (high pupal female and high pupal male) combination and its reciprocal have shown positive heterosis only for fecundity (+22.13 and +35.89%), while DabaxJata [SxS] (high shell female and high shell male) hybrid and its reciprocal are positive in shell weight (+45.12 and +33.54%) and silk ratios (+26.95 and 27.95%). All hybrids of DabaxRaily including reciprocals have shown negative heterosis for fecundity and silk yields. However, DabaxRaily [R], [SxS], [PxS] hybrids and their reciprocals have shown uneven positive heterosis for egg fertility (+1.65 to +20.74%), shell weight (+7.56 to +56.98%) and silk ratios (+1.02 to +54%). In general, all reciprocal F1 hybrids of Daba, Jata and Raily ecoraces have shown lesser heterosis. The dissimilar performance of assorted F1 hybrids and reciprocals of Daba, Jata and Raily ecoraces reveal their varied potential on relative heterosis. However, the study infers commercial prospective and optimal seed cocoon expediency in Daba and Jata ecoraces as F1 hybrids [R] and reciprocals. While, the trait specific positive heterosis in high pupal and high shell hybrids (assorted F1 hybrids) have application in segregating lines with desired traits and aggregating them in to needy one(s).
 
 
 
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