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Articles by P.B. Ekpo
Total Records ( 4 ) for P.B. Ekpo
  E.V. Ikpeme , U.B. Ekaluo , Y.B. Ibiang , O.U. Udensi and P.B. Ekpo
  This study was designed to evaluate the effect of ethanolic stem bark extract of Nauclea latifolia, Cylicodiscus gabunensis and Araliopsis souyauxii; three plants used locally as anti-malarials, on haematology and serum enzyme levels in albino rats. Employing a 3x3 factorial arrangement, thirty six male albino rats were randomly assigned into nine groups of four rats each, treated daily with ethanol extract corresponding to 0, 125 and 225 mg kg-1 b.wt. of the three plants. Treatment was administered orally for two months, after which the animals were sacrificed for estimation of study parameters. All data were subjected to analysis of variance, with conclusions drawn at 5% probability level. Results obtained showed that while N. latifolia and A. souyauxii gave no evidence of potential haemo-toxicity, C. gabunensis at 225 mg kg-1 b.wt. significantly reduced haemoglobin content and packed cell volume of the animals. Although alanine transaminase revealed no significant differences, all plants induced significant elevation in alkaline phosphatase levels at both 125 and 225 mg kg-1 b.wt. Aspartate transaminase was also significantly elevated in all plant groups at 225 mg kg-1 b.wt. Overall, the potential toxic effect of these anti-malarial herbs was observed to be more on serum enzyme levels, than on haematology. In quest for standardized anti-malarial preparations from these herbs, we recommend a dose no more than 225 mg kg-1 b.wt. for N. latifolia and A. souyauxii and 125 mg kg-1 b.wt. for C. gabunensis.
  E.V. Ikpeme , O.U. Udensi , U.B. Ekaluo , M.E. Kooffreh , C.M. Okolo , P.B. Ekpo and N.C. Ogbonna
  The utilization of molecular markers-assisted genetic diversity study is critical and imperative for a more robust selection and breeding programmes in aquaculture. Twenty C. gariepinus species were randomly selected, 5 each from four Rivers/locations-Okurikan (OKU), Lemna (LMN), UNICAL Fish Farm (UFF) and MCC cultured fish site, in Cross River State, Nigeria for genetic diversity study using RAPD technique. Genomic DNA extraction and purification from caudal fin tissue sample was performed using ZR Genomic DNA tissue extraction Kit, primed using OPA09, OPA11 and OPA13 RAPD primers and amplified using PCR. The amplified fragments were ran on gel electrophoresis and visualized under ethidium bromide dye. Thirty four bands were generated by the three RAPD primers from the four C. gariepinus populations of which 28 were polymorphic, accounting for 82.35%. Polymorphism revealed by each fish population ranged from 92.86-100% while, gene diversity estimates ranged from 0.246±0.16-0.385±0.09. Intra-population similarity index ranged from 42.49-78.4% while, the inter-population similarity index across all population combinations ranged from 52.32-71.69%. These result also revealed that as genetic distances increases, genetic identities narrows between the wild and the cultured species. UPGMA dendrogram generated two major clusters with C. gariepinus species from OKU, UFF and MCC in cluster-1 and C. gariepinus species from LMN in cluster-2. Implicitly though, our results suggest that there were several genetic diversity in the populations studied, especially between the cultured and the wild, which could encourage selection of C. gariepinus from OKU and LMN populations for the purpose of breeding and improvement.
  U.B. Ekaluo , E.V. Ikpeme , S.E. Etta and P.B. Ekpo
  Tigernut is consumed by humans and livestock. It also has many medicinal uses. There is growing evidence of decline in human sperm count and quality. Hence, this study seeks to evaluate the effect of Aqueous Extract of Tigernut (AET) on testosterone level, weight of epididymes and testes, sperm count, semen pH, sperm motility, sperm viability and sperm head abnormalities in male rats as a model. The rats were divided into four groups of six rats each. The rats were treated with AET at 0.0, 0.6, 1.2 and 1.8 g kg–1 b.wt. day–1, respectively for nine weeks. After which, the rats were sacrificed and assessed for the parameters. The AET had a dose-dependent effect on all the parameters. In conclusion, AET has the capability of increasing the weights of the testes and epididymes, sperm count, sperm quality and testosterone level. Hence, AET could be used as a possible fertility booster and to attenuate sperm toxicity.
  U.B. Ekaluo , Y.B. Ibiang , E.V. Ikpeme and P.B. Ekpo
  This study was designed to evaluate the anti-mutagenic potential of Myristica fragans (Nutmeg) in male rats. Twenty male wistar rats were randomly distributed into four groups. The treatment groups were administered doses corresponding to 0, 200, 400 and 600 mg kg-1 b.wt. of nutmeg aqueous extract for a period of eight weeks. Data were collected on bone marrow micronucleus index, sperm head abnormality and mutation index. Analysis of variance revealed significant (p<0.05) reductions in sperm head abnormality in the nutmeg treated animals, as compared with the control, in a dose dependent manner. The control had the highest value for sperm head abnormality (6.18±0.55), while 600 mg kg-1 b.wt. group had the lowest value (3.80±0.09). Micronucleus index values in the 600 mg kg-1 b.wt. group (1.40±0.25) was significantly reduced, as compared with the control (3.60±0.51). It was also observed that the mutation indices decreased in a dose dependent manner, from 0.00 in the 0 mg kg-1 b.wt. group to -0.384 in the 600 mg kg-1 b.wt. group. Nutmeg extract showed anti-mutagenic properties, which means the plant contains phyto-antimutagens that could be exploited further in drug development, or as standardized phyto-preparations.
 
 
 
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