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Articles by P. J Limburg
Total Records ( 4 ) for P. J Limburg
  M. J Roth , H. A Katki , W. Q Wei , Y. L Qiao , R Bagni , G. Q Wang , D Whitby , Z. W Dong , M. H Gail , P. J Limburg , C. A Giffen , P. R Taylor and S. M. Dawsey
 

This study represents a multiplex cytokine analysis of serum from a 10-month randomized, controlled trial of 238 subjects that investigated the effects of selenomethionine and/or celecoxib in subjects with mild or moderate esophageal squamous dysplasia. The original chemoprevention study found that, among those with mild dysplasia, selenomethionine treatment favorably altered dysplasia grade. The current analysis found that selenomethionine downregulated interleukin (IL)-2 by 9% (P = 0.04), whereas celecoxib downregulated IL-7 by 11% (P = 0.006) and upregulated IL-13 by 17% (P = 0.008). In addition, an increase in IL-7 tertile from baseline to t10 was significantly associated with an increase in dysplasia grade, both overall [odds ratio (OR), 1.47; P = 0.03] and among those with mild dysplasia at t0 (OR, 2.53; P = 0.001). An increase in IL-2 tertile from baseline to t10 was also nonsignificantly associated with worsening dysplasia for all participants (OR, 1.32; P = 0.098) and significantly associated with worsening dysplasia among those with mild dysplasia at baseline (OR, 2.0; P = 0.01). The association of increased IL-2 with worsening dysplasia remained significant in those on selenomethionine treatment who began the trial with mild dysplasia (OR, 2.52; P = 0.03). The current study shows that selenomethionine supplementation decreased serum IL-2 levels, whereas celecoxib treatment decreased IL-7 levels and increased IL-13 levels during a 10-month randomized chemoprevention trial. An increase in IL-2 or IL-7 was associated with increased severity of dysplasia over the course of the trial, especially in those who began the trial with mild dysplasia. The favorable effect of selenomethionine on esophageal dysplasia in the original trial may have been mediated in part by its effect in reducing the levels of IL-2. Cancer Prev Res; 3(7); 810–7. ©2010 AACR.

  A. M Brewster , S. L Patterson , M. R Forman , C Hughes Halbert , P. J Limburg , F. G Ondrey , E. D Paskett , D. W Wetter and E. T. Hawk
 

The Eighth Annual Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research meeting was held in Houston, Texas, in November 2009. This report highlights significant presentations that advance the fields of chemoprevention, clinical trial recruitment and retention, cancer screening including optical imaging, energy balance, and nutritional epidemiology, and health communications and decision making. In findings from the randomized Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events trial, dutasteride reduced the risk of biopsy-detectable prostate cancer in high-risk men by 23% compared with placebo. Important clues about the dosing and window of susceptibility for supplementation with choline, vitamin D, and folate were revealed from epigenetic research that has implications for future nutritional epidemiology research. Noninvasive optical imaging techniques using endoscopic ultrasound and autofluorescence for the early detection of cancers in the lung, pancreas, and oral cavity are being studied. The report also addresses the challenges of promoting cancer prevention. Understanding how individuals process risk information and make sustained behavior changes and the effect of socioeconomic status on health disparities were identified as critical areas of research. This multidisciplinary research meeting of basic, clinical, and behavioral scientists and epidemiologists continues to play a major role in identifying the research priority areas of cancer prevention, elucidating new mechanisms of carcinogenesis for targeted chemoprevention therapies and delivering a comprehensive strategy for engaging individuals in the unifying goal to reduce cancer incidence. Cancer Prev Res; 3(8); 1044–8. ©2010 AACR.

  D Albanes , S. J Weinstein , M. E Wright , S Mannisto , P. J Limburg , K Snyder and J. Virtamo
  Background

The mitogenic and growth-stimulatory effects of insulin-like growth factors appear to play a role in prostate carcinogenesis, yet any direct association of circulating insulin levels and risk of prostate cancer remains unclear.

Methods

We investigated the relationship of the level of serum insulin, glucose, and surrogate indices of insulin resistance (ie, the molar ratio of insulin to glucose and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]) to the development of prostate cancer in a case–cohort study within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study cohort of Finnish men. We studied 100 case subjects with incident prostate cancer and 400 noncase subjects without prostate cancer from the larger cohort. Fasting serum was collected 5–12 years before diagnosis. We determined insulin concentrations with a double-antibody immunochemiluminometric assay and glucose concentrations with a hexokinase assay. Multivariable logistic regression models estimated relative risks as odds ratios (ORs), and all statistical tests were two-sided.

Results

Insulin concentrations in fasting serum that was collected on average 9.2 years before diagnosis among case subjects were 8% higher than among noncase subjects, and the molar ratio of insulin to glucose and HOMA-IR were 10% and 6% higher, respectively, but these differences were not statistically significant. Among subjects in the second through fourth insulin quartiles, compared with those in the first quartile, increased insulin levels were associated with statistically significantly increased risks of prostate cancer (OR = 1.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.75 to 3.03; OR = 1.75, 95% CI = 0.86 to 3.56; and OR = 2.55, 95% CI = 1.18 to 5.51; for the second through fourth insulin quartiles, respectively; Ptrend = .02). A similar pattern was observed with the HOMA-IR (OR = 2.10, 95% CI = 1.03 to 4.26; Ptrend = .02) for the highest vs lowest quartiles. Risk varied inconsistently with glucose concentration (Ptrend = .38). A stronger association between insulin level and prostate cancer risk was observed among leaner men and among men who were less physically active at work. Crude prostate cancer incidence was 154 prostate cancers per 100 000 person-years in the lowest quartile of fasting serum insulin vs 394 prostate cancers per 100 000 person-years in the highest quartile.

Conclusion

Elevated fasting levels of serum insulin (but not glucose) within the normal range appear to be associated with a higher risk of prostate cancer.

  P. T Campbell , E. T Jacobs , C. M Ulrich , J. C Figueiredo , J. N Poynter , J. R McLaughlin , R. W Haile , E. J Jacobs , P. A Newcomb , J. D Potter , L Le Marchand , R. C Green , P Parfrey , H. B Younghusband , M Cotterchio , S Gallinger , M. A Jenkins , J. L Hopper , J. A Baron , S. N Thibodeau , N. M Lindor , P. J Limburg , M. E Martinez and for the Colon Cancer Family Registry
  Background

Being overweight or obese is an established risk factor for colorectal cancer, more so for men than for women. Approximately 10%–20% of colorectal tumors display microsatellite instability (MSI), defined as the expansion or contraction of small repeated sequences in the DNA of tumor tissue relative to nearby normal tissue. We evaluated associations between overweight or obesity and colorectal cancer risk, overall and by tumor MSI status.

Methods

The study included 1794 case subjects with incident colorectal cancer who were identified through population-based cancer registries and 2684 of their unaffected sex-matched siblings as control subjects. Recent body mass index (BMI), BMI at age 20 years, and adult weight change were derived from self-reports of height and weight. Tumor MSI status, assessed at as many as 10 markers, was obtained for 69.7% of the case subjects and classified as microsatellite (MS)-stable (0% of markers unstable; n = 913), MSI-low (>0% but <30% of markers unstable; n = 149), or MSI-high (≥30% of markers unstable; n = 188). Multivariable conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). All statistical tests were two-sided.

Results

Recent BMI, modeled in 5 kg/m2 increments, was positively associated with risk of colorectal cancer for men and women combined (OR = 1.24; 95% CI = 1.15 to 1.34), for women only (OR = 1.20; 95% CI = 1.10 to 1.32), and for men only (OR = 1.30; 95% CI = 1.15 to 1.47). There was no interaction with sex (P = .22). Recent BMI, per 5 kg/m2, was positively associated with the risk of MS-stable (OR = 1.38; 95% CI = 1.24 to 1.54) and MSI-low (OR = 1.33; 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.72) colorectal tumors, but not with the risk of MSI-high tumors (OR = 1.05; 95% CI = 0.84 to 1.31).

Conclusion

The increased risk of colorectal cancer associated with a high BMI might be largely restricted to tumors that display the more common MS-stable phenotype, suggesting further that colorectal cancer etiology differs by tumor MSI status.

 
 
 
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