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Articles by P. H Huang
Total Records ( 3 ) for P. H Huang
  P. H Huang , D Wang , H. C Chuang , S Wei , S. K Kulp and C. S. Chen
 

As part of our effort to understand the mechanism underlying -tocopheryl succinate [vitamin E succinate (VES)]-mediated antitumor effects, we investigated the signaling pathway by which VES suppresses androgen receptor (AR) expression in prostate cancer cells. VES and, to a greater extent, its truncated derivative TS-1 mediated transcriptional repression of AR in prostate cancer cells but not in normal prostate epithelial cells; a finding that underscores the differential susceptibility of normal versus malignant cells to the antiproliferative effect of these agents. This AR repression was attributable to the ability of VES and TS-1 to facilitate the proteasomal degradation of the transcription factor Sp1. This mechanistic link was corroborated by the finding that proteasome inhibitors or ectopic expression of Sp1 protected cells against drug-induced AR ablation. Furthermore, evidence suggests that the destabilization of Sp1 by VES and TS-1 resulted from the inactivation of Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) as a consequence of increased phosphatase activity of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Stable transfection of LNCaP cells with the dominant-negative JNK1 plasmid mimicked drug-induced Sp1 repression, whereas constitutive activation of JNK kinase activity or inhibition of PP2A activity by okadaic acid protected Sp1 from VES- and TS-1-induced degradation. From a mechanistic perspective, the ability of VES and TS-1 to activate PP2A activity underscores their broad spectrum of effects on multiple signaling mechanisms, including those mediated by Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinases, nuclear factor kappaB, Sp1 and AR. This pleiotropic effect in conjunction with low toxicity suggests the translational potential for developing TS-1 into potent PP2A-activating agents for cancer therapy.

  J Huang , M. I Che , Y. T Huang , M. K Shyu , Y. M Huang , Y. M Wu , W. C Lin , P. H Huang , J. T Liang , P. H Lee and M. C. Huang
 

Mucins play a key role in tumorigenesis. MUC15 is a membrane-bound mucin and the MUC15 messenger RNA (mRNA) has been detected in various organs. However, its role in tumor malignancy is still unclear. This study was to investigate the MUC15 expression in colorectal tumors and the role of MUC15 in colon cancer cells. We found that the mRNA expression of MUC15 was significantly higher in 70.8% (51/72) of colorectal tumors compared with their normal counterparts by real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemistry showed that MUC15 expression was increased in 82.6% (43/52) of colorectal tumors. MUC15 overexpression in HCT116 cells enhanced cell proliferation, cell–extracellular matrix adhesion, colony-forming ability and invasion. Furthermore, these effects were significantly reversed by knockdown of MUC15 with short-hairpin RNA. In nude mice models, MUC15 overexpression significantly (P < 0.01) enhanced tumor growth. In addition, treatment of PD98059 significantly (P < 0.01) inhibited MUC15-enhanced invasion, suggesting that the invasion induced by MUC15 in HCT116 cells was primarily mediated through activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. In conclusion, these results suggest that MUC15 is upregulated in colorectal tumors and its expression enhances the oncogenic potential of colon cancer cells.

  M. C Chen , H Lin , F. N Hsu , P. H Huang , G. S Lee and P. S. Wang
 

The signaling mechanisms underlying cell differentiation have been extensively studied with the use of rat PC12 cells as a model system. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a trophic factor inducing PC12 cell differentiation through the activation of the p35/cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) complex. It has been reported that adenylyl cyclase activation and cAMP production may be involved in NGF-dependent actions. Our previous results indicate that cAMP activates the p35/Cdk5 complex in reproductive cells. Therefore, the role of cAMP in NGF-triggered p35/Cdk5 activation and PC12 differentiation was interesting to explore. Our results indicate that roscovitine, a molecular inhibitor of Cdk5, blocks cAMP-triggered PC12 differentiation, which was evaluated by neurite initiation, a decrease in proliferation, and cell cycle G1 arrest. The following data show that cAMP treatment increased Cdk5 activity through p35 upregulation. cAMP downstream components, protein kinase A (PKA) and phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), are involved in this regulation. The immunocytochemical results indicate that PKA inhibition disrupted cAMP-triggered p35/Cdk5 localization in PC12 cells. In addition, adenylyl cyclase inhibition was found to diminish NGF-induced intracellular cAMP production, CREB phosphorylation, and p35 expression. The cAMP antagonist and the PKA inhibitors reduced NGF-induced p35 expression. Finally, NGF-triggered PC12 differentiation was partially decreased by adenylyl cyclase or PKA inhibitors. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that cAMP may play a role in NGF-p35/Cdk5-dependent PC12 differentiation.

 
 
 
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