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Articles by P. C Austin
Total Records ( 4 ) for P. C Austin
  D. T Ko , L Yun , H. C Wijeysundera , C. A Jackevicius , S. V Rao , P. C Austin , J. F Marquis and J. V. Tu
 

Background— Previous data on bleeding after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) have been obtained primarily from randomized trials that focused on in-hospital bleeding. The incidence of late bleeding after PCI, its independent predictors, and its prognostic importance in clinical practice has not been fully addressed.

Methods and Results— We evaluated 22 798 patients aged >65 years who underwent PCI from December 1, 2003, to March 31, 2007, in Ontario, Canada. Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine factors associated with late bleeding, which was defined as hospitalization for bleeding after discharge from the index PCI, and to estimate risk of death or myocardial infarction associated with late bleeding. We found that 2.5% of patients were hospitalized for bleeding in the year after PCI, with 56% of bleeding episodes due to gastrointestinal bleed. The most significant predictor of late bleeding was warfarin use after PCI (hazard ratio [HR], 3.12). Other significant predictors included age (HR, 1.41 per 10 years), male sex (HR, 1.24), cancer (HR, 1.80), previous bleeding (HR, 2.42), chronic kidney disease (HR, 1.93), and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug use (HR, 1.73). After adjusting for baseline covariates, hospitalization for a bleeding episode was associated with a significantly increased 1-year hazard of death or myocardial infarction (HR, 2.39; 95% CI, 1.93 to 2.97) and death (HR, 3.38; 95% CI, 2.60 to 4.40).

Conclusions— Hospitalization for late bleeding after PCI is associated with substantially increased risk of death and myocardial infarction. The use of triple therapy (ie, aspirin, thienopyridine, and warfarin) is associated with the highest risk of late bleeding.

  D. S Lee , N Ghosh , J. S Floras , G. E Newton , P. C Austin , X Wang , P. P Liu , T. A Stukel and J. V. Tu
 

Background— Higher blood pressure in acute heart failure has been associated with improved survival; however, the relationship between blood pressure and survival in stabilized patients at hospital discharge has not been established.

Methods and Results— In 7448 patients with heart failure (75.2±11.5 years; 49.9% men) discharged from the hospital in Ontario, Canada, we examined the association of systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure with long-term survival. Parametric survival analysis was performed, and survival time ratios were determined according to discharge blood pressure group. A total of 25 427 person-years of follow-up were examined. In those with left ventricular ejection fraction ≤40%, median survival was decreased by 17% (survival time ratio, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.71 to 0.98; P=0.029) when discharge SBP was 100 to 119 mm Hg and decreased by 23% (survival time ratio, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.62 to 0.97; P=0.024) when discharge SBP was <100 mm Hg, compared with those in the reference range of 120 to 139 mm Hg. Survival time ratios were 0.75 (95% CI, 0.60 to 0.92; P=0.007) and 0.75 (95% CI, 0.53 to 1.07; P=0.12) when discharge SBPs were 140 to 159 and ≥160 mm Hg, respectively. In those with left ventricular ejection fraction >40%, survival time ratios were 0.69 (95% CI, 0.51 to 0.93), 0.83 (95% CI, 0.71 to 0.99), 0.95 (95% CI, 0.80 to 1.14), and 0.76 (95% CI, 0.61 to 0.95) for discharge SBPs <100, 100 to 119, 140 to 159, and ≥160 mm Hg, respectively.

Conclusions— In this long-term population-based study of patients with heart failure, the association of discharge SBP with mortality followed a U-shaped distribution. Survival was shortened in those with reduced or increased values of discharge SBP.

  D. S Lee , M. J Schull , D. A Alter , P. C Austin , A Laupacis , A Chong , J. V Tu and T. A. Stukel
 

Background— Although approximately one third of patients with heart failure (HF) visiting the emergency department (ED) are discharged home, little is known about their care and outcomes.

Methods and Results— We examined the acute care and early outcomes of patients with HF who visited an ED and were discharged without hospital admission in Ontario, Canada, from April 2004 to March 2007. Among 50 816 patients (age, 76.4±11.6 years; 49.4% men) visiting an ED for HF, 16 094 (31.7%) were discharged without hospital admission. A total of 4.0% died within 30 days from admission, and 1.3% died within 7 days of discharge from the ED. Although multiple (≥2) previous HF admissions (odds ratio [OR], 1.64; 95% CI, 1.14 to 2.31), valvular heart disease (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.84), peripheral vascular disease (OR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.93), and respiratory disease (OR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.63) increased the risk of 30-day death among those discharged from the ED, presence of these conditions did not increase the likelihood of admission. Patients were more likely to be admitted if they were older (OR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.10 per decade), arrived by ambulance (OR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.93 to 2.12), had a higher triage acuity score (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 3.84 to 4.42), or received resuscitation in the ED (OR, 2.85; 95% CI, 2.68 to 3.04). In those with comparable predicted risks of death, subsequent 90-day mortality rates were higher among discharged than admitted patients (11.9% versus 9.5%; log-rank P=0.016).

Conclusions— Patients with HF who are discharged from the ED have substantial risks of early death, which, in some cases, may exceed that of hospitalized patients.

  S. J Nessim , J. M Bargman , P. C Austin , R Nisenbaum and S. V. Jassal
 

Background and objectives: Despite the decreasing incidence of peritonitis among peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients over time, its occurrence is still associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Determining factors that are associated with PD peritonitis may facilitate the identification of patients who are at risk.

Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Using data collected in the multicenter Baxter POET database between 1996 and 2005, the study population included incident Canadian PD patients. Potential predictors of peritonitis were sought using a negative binomial model and an Andersen-Gill model. Study variables included age, gender, race, cause of renal disease, diabetes status, transfer from hemodialysis (HD), previous renal transplant, and continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD) versus automated PD (APD).

Results: Data were available for 4247 incident PD patients, including 1605 patients with a total of 2555 peritonitis episodes. Using the negative binomial regression model, factors that were independently associated with a higher peritonitis rate included age, Black race, and having transferred from HD. There was an interaction between gender and diabetes, with an increased risk for peritonitis among female patients with diabetes. The use of CAPD versus APD did not affect the peritonitis rate. The Andersen-Gill model for recurrent events yielded similar results.

Conclusions: Predictors of PD peritonitis included Black race, transferring from HD to PD, and diabetes among women. In contrast to previous findings, CAPD and APD were similar with regard to peritonitis risk.

 
 
 
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