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Articles by P. A Holmans
Total Records ( 2 ) for P. A Holmans
  P. B Mahon , J. L Payne , D. F MacKinnon , F. M Mondimore , F. S Goes , B Schweizer , D Jancic , BiGS Consortium NIMH Genetics Initiative Bipolar Disorder Consortium , P. A Holmans , J Shi , J. A Knowles , W. A Scheftner , M. M Weissman , D. F Levinson , J. R DePaulo , P. P Zandi and J. B. Potash
 

OBJECTIVE: Family studies have suggested that postpartum mood symptoms might have a partly genetic etiology. The authors used a genome-wide linkage analysis to search for chromosomal regions that harbor genetic variants conferring susceptibility for such symptoms. The authors then fine-mapped their best linkage regions, assessing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for genetic association with postpartum symptoms. METHOD: Subjects were ascertained from two studies: the NIMH Genetics Initiative Bipolar Disorder project and the Genetics of Recurrent Early-Onset Depression. Subjects included women with a history of pregnancy, any mood disorder, and information about postpartum symptoms. In the linkage study, 1,210 women met criteria (23% with postpartum symptoms), and 417 microsatellite markers were analyzed in multipoint allele sharing analyses. For the association study, 759 women met criteria (25% with postpartum symptoms), and 16,916 SNPs in the regions of the best linkage peaks were assessed for association with postpartum symptoms. RESULTS: The maximum linkage peak for postpartum symptoms occurred on chromosome 1q21.3-q32.1, with a chromosome-wide significant likelihood ratio Z score (ZLR) of 2.93 (permutation p=0.02). This was a significant increase over the baseline ZLR of 0.32 observed at this locus among all women with a mood disorder (permutation p=0.004). Suggestive linkage was also found on 9p24.3-p22.3 (ZLR=2.91). In the fine-mapping study, the strongest implicated gene was HMCN1 (nominal p=0.00017), containing four estrogen receptor binding sites, although this was not region-wide significant. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to examine the genetic etiology of postpartum mood symptoms using genome-wide data. The results suggest that genetic variations on chromosomes 1q21.3-q32.1 and 9p24.3-p22.3 may increase susceptibility to postpartum mood symptoms.

  D Grozeva , G Kirov , D Ivanov , I. R Jones , L Jones , E. K Green , D. M St Clair , A. H Young , N Ferrier , A. E Farmer , P McGuffin , P. A Holmans , M. J Owen , M. C O'Donovan , N Craddock and for the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium
 

Context  Recent studies suggest that copy number variation in the human genome is extensive and may play an important role in susceptibility to disease, including neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. The possible involvement of copy number variants (CNVs) in bipolar disorder has received little attention to date.

Objectives  To determine whether large (>100 000 base pairs) and rare (found in <1% of the population) CNVs are associated with susceptibility to bipolar disorder and to compare with findings in schizophrenia.

Design  A genome-wide survey of large, rare CNVs in a case-control sample using a high-density microarray.

Setting  The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium.

Participants  There were 1697 cases of bipolar disorder and 2806 nonpsychiatric controls. All participants were white UK residents.

Main Outcome Measures  Overall load of CNVs and presence of rare CNVs.

Results  The burden of CNVs in bipolar disorder was not increased compared with controls and was significantly less than in schizophrenia cases. The CNVs previously implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia were not more common in cases with bipolar disorder.

Conclusions  Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder differ with respect to CNV burden in general and association with specific CNVs in particular. Our data are consistent with the possibility that possession of large, rare deletions may modify the phenotype in those at risk of psychosis: those possessing such events are more likely to be diagnosed as having schizophrenia, and those without them are more likely to be diagnosed as having bipolar disorder.

 
 
 
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