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Articles by P Yang
Total Records ( 7 ) for P Yang
  A Qian , S Di , X Gao , W Zhang , Z Tian , J Li , L Hu , P Yang , D Yin and P. Shang
 

The diamagnetic levitation as a novel ground-based model for simulating a reduced gravity environment has been widely applied in many fields. In this study, a special designed superconducting magnet, which can produce three apparent gravity levels (0, 1, and 2 g), namely high magneto-gravitational environment (HMGE), was used to simulate space gravity environment. The effects of HMGE on osteoblast gene expression profile were investigated by microarray. Genes sensitive to diamagnetic levitation environment (0 g), gravity changes, and high magnetic field changes were sorted on the basis of typical cell functions. Cytoskeleton, as an intracellular load-bearing structure, plays an important role in gravity perception. Therefore, 13 cytoskeleton-related genes were chosen according to the results of microarray analysis, and the expressions of these genes were found to be altered under HMGE by real-time PCR. Based on the PCR results, the expressions of WASF2 (WAS protein family, member 2), WIPF1 (WAS/WASL interacting protein family, member 1), paxillin, and talin 1 were further identified by western blot assay. Results indicated that WASF2 and WIPF1 were more sensitive to altered gravity levels, and talin 1 and paxillin were sensitive to both magnetic field and gravity changes. Our findings demonstrated that HMGE can affect osteoblast gene expression profile and cytoskeleton-related genes expression. The identification of mechanosensitive genes may enhance our understandings to the mechanism of bone loss induced by microgravity and may provide some potential targets for preventing and treating bone loss or osteoporosis.

  F Li , P Yang , X Liu , C Wang , S Hou and A. Kijlstra
 

Objectives  To analyze the expression and potential role of interleukin (IL) 21 in the pathogenesis of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease.

Methods  Blood samples were obtained from patients with VKH disease and from healthy control subjects. Serum IL-21 level and IL-21 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and by reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Interleukin 17 and interferon levels in the supernatants of PBMCs and CD4+ T cells cultured with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies in the presence or absence of recombinant IL-21 were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

Results  The results showed a significantly increased serum IL-21 level, as well as higher IL-21 mRNA expression by PBMCs, in patients having chronic or recurrent active VKH disease compared with patients having inactive VKH disease and with controls. In vitro experiments showed that recombinant IL-21 significantly increased IL-17 production by PBMCs and by CD4+ T cells from patients and from controls. However, recombinant IL-21 did not affect interferon expression by PBMCs or by CD4+ T cells.

Conclusion  Interleukin 21 may be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic or recurrent VKH disease, possibly by promoting IL-17 secretion.

Clinical Relevance  Findings from the present study suggest that IL-21 may be a potential target in the development of therapy for VKH disease.

  I Shureiqi , D Chen , R. S Day , X Zuo , F. L Hochman , W. A Ross , R. A Cole , O Moy , J. S Morris , L Xiao , R. A Newman , P Yang and S. M. Lippman
 

Lipoxygenases (LOX) are key enzymes for the oxidative metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids into biologically active products. Clinical data on comparative levels of various LOX products in tumorigenesis are lacking. Therefore, we examined the profiles of several LOX products (5-LOX, 12-LOX, 15-LOX-1, and 15-LOX-2) by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry in the major steps of colorectal tumorigenesis (normal, polyp, and cancer) in a clinical study of 125 subjects (49 with normal colon, 36 with colorectal polyps, and 40 with colorectal cancer) who underwent prospective colorectal biopsies to control for various potential confounding factors (e.g., diet, medications). Mean 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HODE) levels were significantly higher in normal colon [mean, 36.11 ng/mg protein; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 31.56-40.67] than in paired colorectal cancer mucosa (mean, 27.01 ng/mg protein; 95% CI, 22.00-32.02; P = 0.0002), and in normal colon (mean, 37.15 ng/mg protein; 95% CI, 31.95-42.34) than in paired colorectal polyp mucosa (mean, 28.07 ng/mg protein; 95% CI, 23.66-32.48; P < 0.001). Mean 13-HODE levels, however, were similar between the left (mean, 37.15 ng/mg protein; 95% CI, 31.95-42.35) and the right normal colon (mean, 32.46 ng/mg protein; 95% CI, 27.95-36.98; P = 0.09). No significant differences with regard to 12- or 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid or leukotriene B4 levels were detected between normal, polyp, and cancer mucosae. 15-LOX-1 inhibited interleukin-1β expression. This study establishes that reduced 13-HODE levels are a specific alteration in the LOX product profile associated with human colorectal tumorigenesis. Cancer Prev Res; 3(7); 829–38. ©2010 AACR.

  T Truong , W Sauter , J. D McKay , H. D Hosgood , C Gallagher , C. I Amos , M Spitz , J Muscat , P Lazarus , T Illig , H. E Wichmann , H Bickeboller , A Risch , H Dienemann , Z. F Zhang , B. P Naeim , P Yang , S Zienolddiny , A Haugen , L Le Marchand , Y. C Hong , J. H Kim , E. J Duell , A. S Andrew , C Kiyohara , H Shen , K Matsuo , T Suzuki , A Seow , D. P. K Ng , Q Lan , D Zaridze , N Szeszenia Dabrowska , J Lissowska , P Rudnai , E Fabianova , V Constantinescu , V Bencko , L Foretova , V Janout , N. E Caporaso , D Albanes , M Thun , M. T Landi , J Trubicka , M Lener , J Lubinski , Wang EPIC lung , A Chabrier , P Boffetta , P Brennan and R. J. Hung
 

Background. Analysis of candidate genes in individual studies has had only limited success in identifying particular gene variants that are conclusively associated with lung cancer risk. In the International Lung Cancer Consortium (ILCCO), we conducted a coordinated genotyping study of 10 common variants selected because of their prior evidence of an association with lung cancer. These variants belonged to candidate genes from different cancer-related pathways including inflammation (IL1B), folate metabolism (MTHFR), regulatory function (AKAP9 and CAMKK1), cell adhesion (SEZL6) and apoptosis (FAS, FASL, TP53, TP53BP1 and BAT3). Methods. Genotype data from 15 ILCCO case–control studies were available for a total of 8431 lung cancer cases and 11 072 controls of European descent and Asian ethnic groups. Unconditional logistic regression was used to model the association between each variant and lung cancer risk. Results. Only the association between a non-synonymous variant of TP53BP1 (rs560191) and lung cancer risk was significant (OR = 0.91, P = 0.002). This association was more striking for squamous cell carcinoma (OR = 0.86, P = 6 x 10–4). No heterogeneity by center, ethnicity, smoking status, age group or sex was observed. In order to confirm this association, we included results for this variant from a set of independent studies (9966 cases/11 722 controls) and we reported similar results. When combining all these studies together, we reported an overall OR = 0.93 (0.89–0.97) (P = 0.001). This association was significant only for squamous cell carcinoma [OR = 0.89 (0.85–0.95), P = 1 x 10–4]. Conclusion. This study suggests that rs560191 is associated to lung cancer risk and further highlights the value of consortia in replicating or refuting published genetic associations.

  J. A Schwartzbaum , Y Xiao , Y Liu , S Tsavachidis , M. S Berger , M. L Bondy , J. S Chang , S. M Chang , P. A Decker , B Ding , S. J Hepworth , R. S Houlston , F. J Hosking , R. B Jenkins , M. L Kosel , L. S McCoy , P. A McKinney , K Muir , J. S Patoka , M Prados , T Rice , L. B Robertson , M. J Schoemaker , S Shete , A. J Swerdlow , J. L Wiemels , J. K Wiencke , P Yang and M. R. Wrensch
 

To determine whether inherited variations in immune function single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), genes or pathways affect glioblastoma risk, we analyzed data from recent genome-wide association studies in conjunction with predefined immune function genes and pathways. Gene and pathway analyses were conducted on two independent data sets using 6629 SNPs in 911 genes on 17 immune pathways from 525 glioblastoma cases and 602 controls from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and a subset of 6029 SNPs in 893 genes from 531 cases and 1782 controls from MD Anderson (MDA). To further assess consistency of SNP-level associations, we also compared data from the UK (266 cases and 2482 controls) and the Mayo Clinic (114 cases and 111 controls). Although three correlated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) SNPs were consistently associated with glioblastoma in all four data sets (Mantel–Haenzel P values = 1 x 10–5 to 4 x 10–3), independent replication is required as genome-wide significance was not attained. In gene-level analyses, eight immune function genes were significantly (minP < 0.05) associated with glioblastoma; the IL-2RA (CD25) cytokine gene had the smallest minP values in both UCSF (minP = 0.01) and MDA (minP = 0.001) data sets. The IL-2RA receptor is found on the surface of regulatory T cells potentially contributing to immunosuppression characteristic of the glioblastoma microenvironment. In pathway correlation analyses, cytokine signaling and adhesion–extravasation–migration pathways showed similar associations with glioblastoma risk in both MDA and UCSF data sets. Our findings represent the first systematic description of immune genes and pathways that characterize glioblastoma risk.

  T Yang , S. K Chung , W Zhang , J. G.L Mullins , C. H McCulley , J Crawford , J MacCormick , C. A Eddy , A. N Shelling , J. K French , P Yang , J. R Skinner , D. M Roden and M. I. Rees
 

Background— Inherited long-QT syndrome is characterized by prolonged QT interval on the ECG, syncope, and sudden death caused by ventricular arrhythmia. Causative mutations occur mostly in cardiac potassium and sodium channel subunit genes. Confidence in mutation pathogenicity is usually reached through family genotype-phenotype tracking, control population studies, molecular modeling, and phylogenetic alignments; however, biophysical testing offers a higher degree of validating evidence.

Methods and Results— By using in vitro electrophysiological testing of transfected mutant and wild-type long-QT syndrome constructs into Chinese hamster ovary cells, we investigated the biophysical properties of 9 KCNQ1 missense mutations (A46T, T265I, F269S, A302V, G316E, F339S, R360G, H455Y, and S546L) identified in a New Zealand-based long-QT syndrome screening program. We demonstrate through electrophysiology and molecular modeling that 7 of the missense mutations have profound pathological dominant-negative loss-of-function properties, confirming their likely disease-causing nature. This supports the use of these mutations in diagnostic family screening. Two mutations (A46T, T265I) show suggestive evidence of pathogenicity within the experimental limits of biophysical testing, indicating that these variants are disease-causing via delayed- or fast-activation kinetics. Further investigation of the A46T family has revealed an inconsistent cosegregation of the variant with the clinical phenotype.

Conclusions— Electrophysiological characterization should be used to validate long-QT syndrome pathogenicity of novel missense channelopathies. When such results are inconclusive, great care should be taken with genetic counseling and screening of such families, and alternative disease-causing mechanisms should be considered.

  T Truong , R. J Hung , C. I Amos , X Wu , H Bickeboller , A Rosenberger , W Sauter , T Illig , H. E Wichmann , A Risch , H Dienemann , R Kaaks , P Yang , R Jiang , J. K Wiencke , M Wrensch , H Hansen , K. T Kelsey , K Matsuo , K Tajima , A. G Schwartz , A Wenzlaff , A Seow , C Ying , A Staratschek Jox , P Nurnberg , E Stoelben , J Wolf , P Lazarus , J. E Muscat , C. J Gallagher , S Zienolddiny , A Haugen , H. F. M van der Heijden , L. A Kiemeney , D Isla , J. I Mayordomo , T Rafnar , K Stefansson , Z. F Zhang , S. C Chang , J. H Kim , Y. C Hong , E. J Duell , A. S Andrew , F Lejbkowicz , G Rennert , H Muller , H Brenner , L Le Marchand , S Benhamou , C Bouchardy , M. D Teare , X Xue , J McLaughlin , G Liu , J. D McKay , P Brennan and M. R. Spitz
  Background

Genome-wide association studies have identified three chromosomal regions at 15q25, 5p15, and 6p21 as being associated with the risk of lung cancer. To confirm these associations in independent studies and investigate heterogeneity of these associations within specific subgroups, we conducted a coordinated genotyping study within the International Lung Cancer Consortium based on independent studies that were not included in previous genome-wide association studies.

Methods

Genotype data for single-nucleotide polymorphisms at chromosomes 15q25 (rs16969968, rs8034191), 5p15 (rs2736100, rs402710), and 6p21 (rs2256543, rs4324798) from 21 case–control studies for 11 645 lung cancer case patients and 14 954 control subjects, of whom 85% were white and 15% were Asian, were pooled. Associations between the variants and the risk of lung cancer were estimated by logistic regression models. All statistical tests were two-sided.

Results

Associations between 15q25 and the risk of lung cancer were replicated in white ever-smokers (rs16969968: odds ratio [OR] = 1.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.21 to 1.32, Ptrend = 2 x 10–26), and this association was stronger for those diagnosed at younger ages. There was no association in never-smokers or in Asians between either of the 15q25 variants and the risk of lung cancer. For the chromosome 5p15 region, we confirmed statistically significant associations in whites for both rs2736100 (OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.10 to 1.20, Ptrend = 1 x 10–10) and rs402710 (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.09 to 1.19, Ptrend = 5 x 10–8) and identified similar associations in Asians (rs2736100: OR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.12 to 1.35, Ptrend = 2 x 10–5; rs402710: OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.27, Ptrend = .007). The associations between the 5p15 variants and lung cancer differed by histology; odds ratios for rs2736100 were highest in adenocarcinoma and for rs402710 were highest in adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinomas. This pattern was observed in both ethnic groups. Neither of the two variants on chromosome 6p21 was associated with the risk of lung cancer.

Conclusions

In this international genetic association study of lung cancer, previous associations found in white populations were replicated and new associations were identified in Asian populations. Future genetic studies of lung cancer should include detailed stratification by histology.

 
 
 
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