Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by P Muglia
Total Records ( 5 ) for P Muglia
  R Uher , N Perroud , M. Y. M Ng , J Hauser , N Henigsberg , W Maier , O Mors , A Placentino , M Rietschel , D Souery , T Zagar , P. M Czerski , B Jerman , E. R Larsen , T. G Schulze , A Zobel , S Cohen Woods , K Pirlo , A. W Butler , P Muglia , M. R Barnes , M Lathrop< , A Farmer , G Breen , K. J Aitchison , I Craig , C. M Lewis and P. McGuffin
  Objective

The purpose of this study was to identify genetic variants underlying the considerable individual differences in response to antidepressant treatment. The authors performed a genome-wide association analysis of improvement of depression severity with two antidepressant drugs.

Method

High-quality Illumina Human610-quad chip genotyping data were available for 706 unrelated participants of European ancestry treated for major depression with escitalopram (N=394) or nortriptyline (N=312) over a 12-week period in the Genome-Based Therapeutic Drugs for Depression (GENDEP) project, a partially randomized open-label pharmacogenetic trial.

Results

Single nucleotide polymorphisms in two intergenic regions containing copy number variants on chromosomes 1 and 10 were associated with the outcome of treatment with escitalopram or nortriptyline at suggestive levels of significance and with a high posterior likelihood of true association. Drug-specific analyses revealed a genome-wide significant association between marker rs2500535 in the uronyl 2-sulphotransferase gene and response to nortriptyline. Response to escitalopram was best predicted by a marker in the interleukin-11 (IL11) gene. A set of 72 a priori-selected candidate genes did not show pharmacogenetic associations above a chance level, but an association with response to escitalopram was detected in the interleukin-6 gene, which is a close homologue of IL11.

Conclusions

While limited statistical power means that a number of true associations may have been missed, these results suggest that efficacy of antidepressants may be predicted by genetic markers other than traditional candidates. Genome-wide studies, if properly replicated, may thus be important steps in the elucidation of the genetic basis of pharmacological response.

  C. M Lewis , M. Y Ng , A. W Butler , S Cohen Woods , R Uher , K Pirlo , M. E Weale , A Schosser , U. M Paredes , M Rivera , N Craddock , M. J Owen , L Jones , I Jones , A Korszun , K. J Aitchison , J Shi , J. P Quinn , A MacKenzie , P Vollenweider , G Waeber , S Heath , M Lathrop , P Muglia , M. R Barnes , J. C Whittaker , F Tozzi , F Holsboer , M Preisig , A. E Farmer , G Breen , I. W Craig and P. McGuffin
  Objective

Studies of major depression in twins and families have shown moderate to high heritability, but extensive molecular studies have failed to identify susceptibility genes convincingly. To detect genetic variants contributing to major depression, the authors performed a genome-wide association study using 1,636 cases of depression ascertained in the U.K. and 1,594 comparison subjects screened negative for psychiatric disorders.

Method

Cases were collected from 1) a case-control study of recurrent depression (the Depression Case Control [DeCC] study; N=1346), 2) an affected sibling pair linkage study of recurrent depression (probands from the Depression Network [DeNT] study; N=332), and 3) a pharmacogenetic study (the Genome-Based Therapeutic Drugs for Depression [GENDEP] study; N=88). Depression cases and comparison subjects were genotyped at Centre National de Génotypage on the Illumina Human610-Quad BeadChip. After applying stringent quality control criteria for missing genotypes, departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and low minor allele frequency, the authors tested for association to depression using logistic regression, correcting for population ancestry.

Results

Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in BICC1 achieved suggestive evidence for association, which strengthened after imputation of ungenotyped markers, and in analysis of female depression cases. A meta-analysis of U.K. data with previously published results from studies in Munich and Lausanne showed some evidence for association near neuroligin 1 (NLGN1) on chromosome 3, but did not support findings at BICC1.

Conclusions

This study identifies several signals for association worthy of further investigation but, as in previous genome-wide studies, suggests that individual gene contributions to depression are likely to have only minor effects, and very large pooled analyses will be required to identify them.

  B Inkster , T. E Nichols , P. G Saemann , D. P Auer , F Holsboer , P Muglia and P. M. Matthews
 

Context  Indirect evidence suggests that the glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) gene might be implicated in major depressive disorder (MDD).

Background  We evaluated 15 GSK3β single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to test for associations with regional gray matter (GM) volume differences in patients with recurrent MDD. We then used the defined regions of interest based on significant associations to test for MDD x genotype interactions by including a matched control group without any psychiatric disorder, including MDD.

Design  General linear model with nonstationary cluster-based inference.

Setting  Munich, Germany.

Participants  Patients with recurrent MDD (n = 134) and age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched healthy controls (n = 143).

Main Outcome Measures  Associations between GSK3β polymorphisms and regional GM volume differences.

Results  Variation in GM volume was associated with GSK3β polymorphisms; the most significant associations were found for rs6438552, a putative functional intronic SNP that showed 3 significant GM clusters in the right and left superior temporal gyri and the right hippocampus (P < .001, P = .02, and P = .02, respectively, corrected for multiple comparisons across the whole brain). Similar results were obtained with rs12630592, an SNP in high linkage disequilibrium. A significant SNP x MDD status interaction was observed for the effect on GM volumes in the right hippocampus and superior temporal gyri (P < .001 and P = .01, corrected, respectively).

Conclusions  The GSK3β gene may have a role in determining regional GM volume differences of the right hippocampus and bilateral superior temporal gyri. The association between genotype and brain structure was specific to the patients with MDD, suggesting that GSK3β genotypes might interact with MDD status. We speculate that this is a consequence of regional neocortical, glial, or neuronal growth or survival. In considering core cognitive features of MDD, the association of GSK3β polymorphisms with structural variation in the temporal lobe and hippocampus is of particular interest in the context of other evidence for structural and functional abnormalities in the hippocampi of patients with MDD.

  G Donohoe , J Walters , D. W Morris , E. M Quinn , R Judge , N Norton , I Giegling , A. M Hartmann , H. J Moller , P Muglia , H Williams , V Moskvina , R Peel , T O'Donoghue , M. J Owen , M. C O'Donovan , M Gill , D Rujescu and A. Corvin
 

Context  Human and animal studies have implicated the gene NOS1 in both cognition and schizophrenia susceptibility.

Objective  To investigate whether a potential schizophrenia risk single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs6490121) identified in a recent genome-wide association study negatively influences cognition in patients with schizophrenia and healthy control subjects.

Design  A comparison of both cases and controls grouped according to NOS1 genotype (GG vs AG vs AA) on selected measures of cognition in 2 independent samples. We tested for association between NOS1 rs6490121 and cognitive functions known to be impaired in schizophrenia (IQ, episodic memory, working memory, and attentional control) in an Irish sample. We then sought to replicate the significant results in a German sample.

Setting  Unrelated patients from general adult psychiatric inpatient and outpatient services and unrelated healthy volunteers from the general population were ascertained.

Participants  Patients with DSM-IV–diagnosed schizophrenia and healthy control subjects from independent samples of Irish (cases, n = 349; controls, n = 230) and German (cases, n = 232; controls, n = 1344) nationality.

Results  A main effect of NOS1 genotype on verbal IQ and working memory was observed in the Irish sample where the homozygous carriers of the schizophrenia risk G allele performed poorly compared with the other genotype groups. These findings were replicated in the German sample, again with the GG genotype carriers performing below other genotype groups. Post hoc analysis of additional IQ measures (full-scale and performance IQ) in the German sample revealed that NOS1 GG carriers underperformed on these measures also.

Conclusions  NOS1 is associated with clinically significant variation in cognition. Whether this is a mechanism by which schizophrenia risk is increased (eg, via an influence on cognitive reserve) is yet to be confirmed.

  K. K Nicodemus , A. J Law , E Radulescu , A Luna , B Kolachana , R Vakkalanka , D Rujescu , I Giegling , R. E Straub , K McGee , B Gold , M Dean , P Muglia , J. H Callicott , H. Y Tan and D. R. Weinberger
 

Context  NRG1 is a schizophrenia candidate gene and plays an important role in brain development and neural function. Schizophrenia is a complex disorder, with etiology likely due to epistasis.

Objective  To examine epistasis between NRG1 and selected N-methyl-d-aspartate–glutamate pathway partners implicated in its effects, including ERBB4, AKT1, DLG4, NOS1, and NOS1AP.

Design  Schizophrenia case-control sample analyzed using machine learning algorithms and logistic regression with follow-up using neuroimaging on an independent sample of healthy controls.

Participants  A referred sample of schizophrenic patients (n = 296) meeting DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia spectrum disorder and a volunteer sample of controls for case-control comparison (n = 365) and a separate volunteer sample of controls for neuroimaging (n = 172).

Main Outcome Measures  Epistatic association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and case-control status; epistatic association between SNPs and the blood oxygen level–dependent physiological response during working memory measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging.

Results  We observed interaction between NRG1 5' and 3' SNPs rs4560751 and rs3802160 (likelihood ratio test P = .00020) and schizophrenia, which was validated using functional magnetic resonance imaging of working memory in healthy controls; carriers of risk-associated genotypes showed inefficient processing in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (P = .015, familywise error corrected). We observed epistasis between NRG1 (rs10503929; Thr286/289/294Met) and its receptor ERBB4 (rs1026882; likelihood ratio test P = .035); a 3-way interaction with these 2 SNPs and AKT1 (rs2494734) was also observed (odds ratio, 27.13; 95% confidence interval, 3.30-223.03; likelihood ratio test P = .042). These same 2- and 3-way interactions were further biologically validated via functional magnetic resonance imaging: healthy individuals carrying risk genotypes for NRG1 and ERBB4, or these 2 together with AKT1, were disproportionately less efficient in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex processing. Lower-level interactions were not observed between NRG1 /ERBB4 and AKT1 in association or neuroimaging, consistent with biological evidence that NRG1 x ERBB4 interaction modulates downstream AKT1 signaling.

Conclusion  Our data suggest complex epistatic effects implicating an NRG1 molecular pathway in cognitive brain function and the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.

 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility