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Articles by Omer A. Musa
Total Records ( 6 ) for Omer A. Musa
  Asim A. Osman , Imadeldin E. Aradaib and Omer A. Musa
  This study was carried out to evaluate, PCR-based method for detection of DNA in goat milk. It utilized primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome b (mtcyt-b) gene which was used as a target DNA for PCR amplification. For the specific identification of goat mtcyt-b gene, pair of primers (GSL1, GSR2) were used which produced a 428 base pair (bp) PCR product from milk samples as well as from peripheral blood. Amplification products were visualized on ethidium bromide-stained agarose gels. Amplification products were not detected when the PCR was applied to DNA from animal species including cattle, sheep, swine, camel, deer, horse, donkey and human which indicates that the 2 pairs of primers are specific for goat. In conclusion, DNA can be extracted from goat milk and would be advantageous in the variety of application such as species identification in milk and milk.
  Ibrahim A. Ali and Omer A. Musa
  Due to lack of locally derived reference values; clinicians use reference intervals derived from western population. But, studies conducted on different reference values have indicated differences between locally and western derived reference values. The normal values of Fasting Blood Glucose (FBG) in Sudanese must be established for the clinical diagnosis of DM. The objective of this study was to establish the normal values of FBG in Sudanese healthy adults and compare the results with the international values. Cross sectional study was conducted during 2016-2018 in Sudan covered Khartoum state, Northern state, Gezira state, Red Nile state and North Darfur state on adults of ages between 20-60 years and not known to be diabetic or suffering from any chronic illness. The 1096 participants were assessed by a questionnaire covering age, family history of Diabetes Mellitus, physical activity, daily caloric intake and smoking. BMI was calculated by measuring weight and height by weight and height standard scales. A sample of venous blood was taken for FBG measurement using autoanalyzer A 15 machine. Correlations between the variables were estimated and p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. The mean of age, BMI and HbA1c was found to be 25.1±9.5 years, 22.8±4.8 and 4.6±0.9%, respectively. The mean of FBG was 74.3±13.8 mg dL–1 with a range of 60.5-88.1 mg dL–1. FBG was found to be positively correlated with Hb, RBCs and platelets counts with significant p value (p≤0.05). There was no significant correlation observed between FBG and HbA1c level (r = -0.003, p = 0.957). This study showed significant variations in the level of FBG of healthy Sudanese in comparison with the reference ranges of international parameters, so, the normal values for FBG in Sudanese is lower than that currently use.
  Ibrahim A. Ali and Omer A. Musa
  HbA1c is now used largely for DM control, the normal values of HbA1c in Sudanese must be established for the clinical diagnosis and follow-up of DM. Racial and ethnic differences in HbA1c have been recognized for many years but have generally been attributed to differences in access to medical care or quality of care. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of racial and ethnic variations on the normal values of Hemoglobin A1c in Sudanese healthy adults. A cross sectional study was conducted during 2016-2018 in concomitant with another study in Sudan covering Khartoum state, Northern state, Gezira state, Red Nile state and North Darfur state on adults of ages between 20-60 years and not known to be diabetic or suffering from any chronic illness. 1096 participants were assessed by a questionnaire covering the demographic and medical history details. A sample of 5 mL venous blood was taken for FBG to exclude DM and for measurement of HbA1c using modified ELISA reader known as Cobas Integra 800 (Roch) machine. Correlations between the variables were estimated and p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. The overall mean value of HbA1c was 4.6% ±0.9 with a minimums value of 1.2% and maximums of 6.3. At 95% confidence interval the lower bound mean was 4.5% and the upper bound mean was 4.7%. In Sudanese states which cover under this study the highest mean of HbA1c was observed in Red Sea state (5.0%) and lowest mean was found in the Northern state (4.0%). In the Sudanese tribes, the highest values were obtained in the central Sudan tribes (4.77%) which most of them they are resident in Khartoum and Gezira States and the lowest value obtained in the North Sudan Tribes which they are mostly found in the Northern and Khartoum States (4.55%) with significant p = 0.01. This study showed significant variations in the level of HbA1c of healthy Sudanese in comparison with the effect of tribes, residences and home of origin. These findings suggest that more research is needed to understand the role of genomic ancestry on levels of HbA1c concentrations. There was also variation of reference values might be based on climate and geographical locations which may need further studies.
  Azza M. Bashir , Ibrahim A. Ali , Mazin S Abdalla and Omer A. Musa
  Many previous studies have shown that the blood pressure increased with the increase in body mass index if the normal blood pressure is dependent on body mass index then normal values of blood pressure should be related to BMI and consequently, hypertension classification be revised. In Sudan the reference values of blood pressure is ill defined, so, still international reference values are used despite the differences in ethnicity, life style and nutritional status. This study was designed to establish the relation of normal blood pressure and body mass index among healthy Sudanese adult’s females and males in Khartoum state. A cross sectional study was conducted 2016 in AL Khartoum state on healthy Sudanese adult’s males and females. About 200 participants aged between 20-60 years were assessed by a questionnaires covering their age, gender, smoking history, food habit and amount of salt and physical activity, then the blood pressure was measured by manual sphygmomanometer in a sitting position, height was measured by tape and weight by weight scale, body mass index then calculated by the formula BMI = wt/ht2. Correlation between blood pressure and body mass index was assessed and was taken positive if p value was ≤0.05(was consider to be significant). There is significant correlation between body mass index a nd systolic blood pressure p = 0.01 while for diastolic blood pressure p = 0.05. Females have higher BMI than males, 40% of the females were obese while only 19.4% of male were. Males have higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure than females. The study showed positive correlation between blood pressure and body mass index where there is increased in blood pressure with increased body mass index. Further, studies are recommended to identify the normal blood pressure for every body mass index.
  Osman E. Yousif , Ibrahim A. Ali and Omer A. Musa
  Pregnancy is a dynamic process characterized by multiple physiological changes in the cardiovascular system. These changes are adaptive mechanisms to face the high metabolic demand for both fetus and mother. Measurement of arterial blood pressure is important in each Ante-Natal Care (ANC) visit to categorize pregnant ladies for early detection and management of Pregnancy Induced Hypertension (PIH) cases. There are no reference values of arterial blood pressure among healthy Sudanese pregnant ladies and the values of blood pressure were obtained from international studies also fasting Ramadan can affect the blood pressure, blood glucose and body mass index. This study aimed at determining the effect of Fasting on the arterial blood pressure among healthy pregnant and non-pregnant Sudanese ladies living in Khartoum state. A case control study was conducted in Khartoum state during May-October, 2019 on (105) healthy Sudanese ladies who were randomly selected, their age range between 17-40 years. About 20 of them served as control group (non pregnant and not fasting) and (55) of them were pregnant not fasting and (30) fasting pregnant ladies as cases. All participants were assessed by questionnaire after filling an informed consent. Blood pressure was measured 3 times at resting state according to WHO criteria. In the fasting groups the blood pressure was measured before 3 pm. Data was analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) Version 25 with significant p#0.05, comparing the fasting pregnant blood pressures with the non fasting. The blood pressure was found to be 100.6/67.8 mmHg in pregnant women, not fasting, 114.2/75 mmHg in non pregnant and 103.6/67.9 mmHg in fasting pregnant ladies. In the pregnant not fasting group the blood pressure was found to be 94.7(±7.5)/63(±5.9 mm Hg) for first trimester, 100.4 (± 9.2)/67.2(±7.9 mmHg )for second trimester and 105.4 (± 13.2)/72.2(±7.3 mmHg) for the third trimester. While for the fasting group the blood pressure was found to be 104.6 (±15.1)/70.4(±14.2 mmHg) in the first trimester, 96.4 (±6.7)/63.8(±4.6 mmHg) in the second trimester and 109.7(±13.2)/69.4 mmHg (±9.7) in the third trimester. The results of this study showed that the pregnancy affects blood pressure significantly and the BP is lower in the first trimester than second trimester and the BP in the second trimester is lower than the third trimester. The mean of systolic and diastolic blood in the fasting group were higher than the mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures in non fasting group. The highest mean systolic blood pressure was recorded at the third trimester and the highest mean diastolic blood pressure recorded at the first trimester. Antenatal care follow up according to reference values for Sudanese ladies is important for the early detection and management of pregnancy induced hypertension. Further confirmatory studies are needed.
  Mazin S. Abdalla , Ibrahim A. Ali , Azza M. Bashir and Omer A. Musa
  The blood pressure (systolic and diastolic) has been found to increase with increased weight. This relationship is well advocated in many solid researches around the world. However, the relationship does not account to a cause and effect relation, the increment in the body weight may only raise the risk of increasing blood pressure. The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between the body mass index and blood pressure levels in healthy Sudanese population residing in Khartoum state. A cross sectional study was conducted during July-August, 2016 in Khartoum state on a sample size of 200 subjects adult males/females of ages between 20-60 years and who were not known to be hypertensive. All the participants were assessed by a questionnaire covering age, gender, physical activity, daily salt intake and smoking history. Blood pressure was measured using the manual sphygmomanometer. Weight was measure using the standard scale. BMI was calculated according to the formula Weight (kg)/[height (m)]2. Correlations between the variables were estimated and p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. There is a significant positive relationship between the BMI and the systolic blood pressure (p = 0.01), the statistical analysis also showed a significant positive relationship between the BMI and the diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.01). This study has demonstrated that the association between the body mass index and the blood pressure is significant. However, further studies on a larger sample size is required, so as to establish a mathematical formula to predict the blood pressure given the body mass index. There is positive correlation between systolic, diastolic blood pressure and BMI. Increased blood pressure was seen in individuals with higher BMI when compared with individuals with lower BMI.
 
 
 
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