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Articles by O.H. Matloup
Total Records ( 6 ) for O.H. Matloup
  H.A. Murad , A.M. Abd El Tawab , A.M. Kholif , S.A. Abo El-Nor , O.H. Matloup , M.M. Khorshed and H.M. El-Sayed
  Tannase production by Aspergillus niger was evaluated under solid-state fermentation and submerged fermentation cultures. The optimum conditions for maximum enzyme production including deferent inoculum ratios, incubation periods, initial pH values, nitrogen and carbon sources were investigated. A. niger was grown as stand cultures in 250 mL conical flasks containing tannic acid powder medium. The maximum production of tannase by A. niger was achieved at inoculum ratio of 2% (v/v), 96 h of incubation period, initial pH 5.0, yeast extract as a nitrogen sources at a concentration of 0.33 g N L-1 and palm kernel powder (PKP) as a carbon source at a concentration of 25% (w/v). PKP was found to be the best carbon source supporting production of 931.27 U L-1 min-1 compared with 6.25 U L-1 min-1 for wheat straw.
  T.A. Morsy , S.M. Kholif , O.H. Matloup , M.M. Abdo and M.H. El-Shafie
  This experiment was designed to study the effects of dietary addition of some essential oils on ruminal fermentation characteristics, blood parameters milk production and milk composition. Twenty lactating Damascus goats, seven days after parturition, were assigned randomly into four groups (five animals each) using complete randomized block design. Experimental period lasted for 90 days. Goats of each group were fed the same basal diet and received one of the following treatments; (C) control (without oil), (ANI) control diet+2 mL Anise oil/head/day (mL/h/d), (CLO) control diet+2 mL Clove oil/h/d, (JUN) control diet+2 mL Juniper oil/h/d. Ruminal Total Volatile Fatty Acids (TVFA) has achieved an increase while, ammonia nitrogen was decreased with Essential Oils (EO) additives. Values of serum total protein and globulin have recorded the highest concentrations, on the contrary, blood urea nitrogen and cholesterol concentrations were recorded the lowest values with EO additives. Milk yield and milk composition were not significantly affected by EO additives, while milk fat and milk non-protein nitrogen contents which decreased with EO additives and milk protein content increased with EO additives compared to control. Goats fed diet supplemented with Juniper oil produced milk fat have highest value of total and individual Conjugated Linoleic Acids (CLA) and C18.3N3 (omega 3). Results from this study suggested that feeding these EO (2 g/h/d) to lactating dairy goats had limited effects on milk production and milk composition but feeding 2 mL Juniper oil/h/d changed milk fatty acids profile for healthy effect on the consumers.
  Mostafa Sayed Khattab , S.A.H. Abo El-Nor , H.M.A. El-Sayed , N.E. El-Bordeny , M.M. Abdou and O.H. Matloup
  The increase in bio-ethanol industry has created a need for alternative to corn for ruminants. In the other side there is increase in availability of glycerol, a primary co-product material of biodiesel production. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of partial replacing of corn with glycerol in diets fed to lactating goats. Twelve lactating Nubian goats were fed a base diet (T1), diets containing 9% glycerol (on DM basis) (T2) and diet containing 9% glycerol plus commercial enzymes 4 g kg-1 DM (on DM basis) (T3) for 84 days. The experimental diets T2 and T3 decreased butyric acids concentration and acetate:propionate ratio in rumen liquor in relation to T1, the concentration of propionic acid was increased in T2 and T3 compared with T1. Replacing corn by glycerol (T2) decreased apparent nutrients digestion coefficients Dry Matter (DM), Organic Matter (OM), Crud Protein (CP), Neutral Detergent Fiber (NDF) and Acid Detergent Fiber (ADF) comparing with other treatments (T1 and T3). Milk production was 1581, 1174 and 1610±77.6 g h-1 day-1 and FCM was 1774, 1030 and 1648±115.9 g h-1 day-1 for T1, T2 and T3, respectively, Milk composition was not altered by glycerol feeding plus fibrinolytic enzymes (T3) except that milk total protein was decreased from 4.6 24 to 3.5%. While, replacing corn by glycerol (T2) decreased values of milk composition compared with control diets (T1). The results indicated that glycerol is a suitable replacement for corn grain with adding fibrinolytic enzymes in diets for lactating goats and that it may be included in rations to a level of at least 9% of dry matter without adverse effects on milk yield or milk composition.
  A.M. Abd El Tawab , O.H. Matloup , A.M. Kholif , S.A.H. Abo El-Nor , H.A. Murad , H.M. El-Sayed and M.M. Khorshed
  Two experiments were carried out to evaluate the effects of laboratory produced tannase enzyme (Tanozym) to diet including Palm Kernel Powder (PKP) on in vitro dry matter and organic matter disappearance (IVDMD and IVOMD) and in vivo nutrients digestibility, nutritive values, milk production and composition by lactating Baladi goats. In vitro experiment, IVDMD and IVOMD, were determined for control diets (60% CFM and 40% Berseem hay); (T1) control diet plus different levels of polyethylene glycol (PEG), being 10, 15 and 20 g kg-1 DM and (T2) control diet plus different levels of Tanozym (3.9, 5.85 and 7.8 U kg-1 DM). The maximum IVDMD and IVOMD values were observed with 5.85 U kg-1 DM for Tanozym and 20 g kg-1 DM for PEG compared to control, however there was no significant (p<0.05) difference between 15 and 20 g kg-1 DM. The in vivo experiment was carried out on nine lactating Baladi goats after 7 days of parturition where animals were divided into three groups, three animals each, using 3x3 Latin square design. The first group fed control diet (60% CFM and 40% Berseem hay), the second group fed T1 (control diet plus 15 g kg-1, DM), the third group fed T2 (control diet plus 5.85 U kg-1, DM). Tanozym supplementation significantly (p<0.05) increased nutrients digestibility, nutritive values, ruminal Total Volatile Fatty Acids (TVFA’s) but insignificant (p<0.05) increased ammonia nitrogen (NH3 N). Lower significant (p<0.05) values of rumen pH were recorded for treated groups compared with the control. Blood serum of animals fed Tanozym and PEG had higher values of total protein, albumin, globulin, total lipids, urea and glucose but lower values of AST and ALT compared with those of control. Daily milk yield, SNF, lactose and ash yield were significantly (p<0.05) increased with Tanozym compared control group. While, there are no significant (p>0.05) differences among groups for fat corrected milk 4%, total solids, fat and total protein yield.
  M.S.A. Khattab , H.M. El-Zaiat , A.M. Abd El Tawab , O.H. Matloup , A.S. Morsy , M.M. Abdou , H.M. Ebeid , M.F.A. Attia and S.M.A. Sallam
  Background: The current study was carried out to investigate addition of lemongrass or galangal to diet and its effect of productive performance of lactating Barki goats. Materials and Methods: Thirty lactating Barki goats were divided into three groups (10 animals per each treatment), first group was fed control diet without additives, consist of Egyptian clover hay, corn silage and concentrate feed mixture (10:30:60% on DM basis, respectively) (Control); second group was fed control diet plus 4 g of lemongrass kg–1 DM and the third group was fed control diet plus 4 g galangal kg–1 DM.Results: The results showed that adding galangal increased propionate concentrations (p<0.05) compared with control (41.13, 37.75 and 39.46 mM for galangal, control and lemongrass, respectively); while, there were no differences (p>0.05) between treatments in acetate and butyrate concentrations. Ammonia concentration was higher (p<0.05) in lemongrass compared with other treatments (21.49, 15.92 and 15.91 mM for lemongrass, control and galangal, respectively). Milk yield were significantly increased (p<0.05) by adding lemongrass or galangal to the diets (825 and 771 g day–1 for lemongrass and galangal) compared with control (652 g day–1 ). Also, milk lactose content was significantly increased (p<0.05) in lemongrass compared with control (44, 40 and 39 g kg–1 for lemongrass, control and galangal, respectively). Conclusion: It could be concluded that adding lemongrass or galangal the diet could enhance the performance of lactating Barki goat.
  M.S.A. Khattab , E.A. El-Bltagy , A.M. Abd El Tawab , O.H. Matloup , T.A. Morsy , H.H. Azzaz and M.M. Abdou
  Background and Objective: Utilization of date seeds (processed date by product) as a feedstuff in diets of farm animals are being in spotlight, this study were carried out to investigate the effect of feeding diets contain cracked date seed with or without fibrolytic enzyme, versus control diet using Egyptian buffaloes. Materials and Methods: Fifteen multiparous lactating Egyptian buffaloes (600±30 kg BW) were randomly assigned for 90 days in a completely randomized experimental design. Buffaloes were randomly assigned to 3 groups and fed a basal diet of concentrates, Egyptian clover and rice straw in a ratio of 50:30:20 DM basis (T1), the second group fed (T2) concentrate feed mixture, cracked date seed, Egyptian clover and rice straw as 35:15:30:20, respectively and the third group fed as T2 diet plus fibrolytic enzyme. Results: T2 groups had reduced feed intake (p>0.09) and DM, OM, NDF and ADF digestibility (p<0.05) than control (T1). While, T3 improved fiber digestion (NDF and ADF) compared with T2, with no differences with control (T1). Similarly, T2 resulted in lower (p<0.05) daily milk yield, energy corrected milk and milk efficiency (p<0.05) compared with T1, whilst, T3 improved the milk yield and ECM and milk efficiency compared with T2 (p<0.05) but without differences with T1 (p<0.05). Conclusion: It could be concluded that using cracked date seed with fibrolytic enzymes in lactating buffalo's diet improved feed conversation and productive performance with no negative effect on animal health.
 
 
 
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