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Articles by O. Ojogho
Total Records ( 4 ) for O. Ojogho
  O. Ojogho
  The examined the determinants of food insecurity among arable farmers in Egor and Oredo local government areas of Edo state in Nigeria. Both secondary and primary data were used. The descriptive statistics used the Greer-Thorbecke distributional measure of food insecurity while the inferential statistics used a multiple binomial logit regression model to analyze data of a set of socio-economic variables as the explanatory variables and food insecurity status as independent variable. The result showed that 41-50 years age group had 13.10, 2.90 and 0.86% as headcount index, short fall index and severity of food insecurity while the households with male as head had 21.62, 5.62 and 1.91% as headcount index, short fall index and severity of food insecurity, respectively. The education level of farmers, house hold size, output level of house hold and per capita income of the house hold were found to significantly affect food insecurity in the area. The probability of a house hold being food insecure due to house hold size, house hold dependency ratio, sex of house hold head, age and the level of education were 0.867, 0.815, 0.476, 0.812 and 0.018, respectively. At the mean values of determinants of food insecurity in the study the probability of a house hold being food insecure was 0.997 (99.7%). Approximately, three in every four people were found to be food insecure. Effort should be made to improve the income earning capacity of the house holds, their education levels and reduce the house hold size with a view to reducing their dependency ratio.
  P.O.I. Erhabor and O. Ojogho
  The study examined the effect of quality on the demand for in South-Western agro-ecological zone of Nigeria. To achieve this, the study examined the socio-economic characteristics of rice-consuming households, the share of rice expenditure in total household expenditure and quantity and the quality elasticities of rice in the study area. Both primary and secondary data were used to generate information for this study. A multi-stage sampling procedure, involving four stages was used to select 812 households. Data collected were analysed, using both descriptive and inferential statistics. The result of the descriptive statistics showed that rice consumption/demand was more in the urban centres than the rural centres of the study area, mostly among the married and the medium-size male-headed households with tertiary-education. Rice constituted the largest share of the household, total food expenditure which is 24% for the high-income and 28% for the low-income households but 21% among the urban households and 24% among the rural households. The result of the multiple regressions showed that rice was quality elastic. Rice demand in Nigeria is affected by the total expenditure of household and quality. Rural households also value quality and respond more than urban households for every 1% increase in their income. Quality is important in the demand for rice, even in the rural areas. Nigeria must improve on the processing, storage, marketing services and safety attributes of rice particularly, the locally produced with a view to improving the quality of rice consumed and cut-down on importation if it is to attain food security in rice. Government, community based organization and non-governmental organizations can help in this direction.
  O. Ojogho and P.O. Erhabor
  The study examined rice demand pattern and its intervening factors in Nigeria. To achieve this, the study examined the socio-economic characteristics of rice-consuming households, average income of households, quantity of rice, expenditure share of rice, rice meals consumption patterns, rice meals consumption habitand factor affecting rice meals consumption patterns. Both primary and secondary data were used to generate information for this study. A multi-stage sampling procedure, involving four stages, was used to select 812 households. Data collected were analysed using both descriptive and inferential statistics. The result of the descriptive statistics showed that rice consumption/demand was more in the urban centres than the rural centres of the study area, mostly among the married and the medium-size male-headed households with tertiary-education. Rice constituted the largest share of the household total food expenditure, ranging between about 28 and 21% among the high income and urban household, to 28 and 24% among the low income and rural households. The result of the multiple regressions showed that the pattern of rice consumption in Nigeria is a phenomenon linked with socio-economic characteristics of households, the type of rice, level of education, ease of preparation and urban lifestyles. Attention must be paid to these factors if Nigeria is to attain self-sufficiency in rice for sustainable consumption.
  P.O.I. Erhabor and O. Ojogho
  The study examined demand analysis for rice in Edo, Delta and Lagos States of Nigeria using both primary and secondary data. To achieve this, the study examined the socio-economic characteristics of rice consuming households, estimated the complete demand functions for rice and the selected common food commodities and their price and expenditure elasticities in the study area. A multi-stage sampling technique was used to select households within the study area in the three states from 812 rice-consuming households using the Simple Random Sampling technique. Data collected were subjected to both descriptive and inferential statistics. The result of the descriptive statistics showed that rice constituted the largest share of the household total food expenditure, ranging between about 28 and 21% among the high income and urban household to 28 and 24% among the low income and rural households but mostly among the married and the medium-size male-headed households who had tertiary-education. The result of the multiple regressions showed that besides being a normal good, a necessity with no substitute, price inelastic, expenditure inelastic, rice took an average of 21.25% of the food budget share of a rice-consuming household for 1unit income and expenditure but increased budget share of rice by 6.05% for 1 increase in its unit price. The prices of beans, yam, garri and meat/fish were also significantly important in the share of rice in household total food expenditure at constant real income.
 
 
 
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