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Articles by O. Obidoa
Total Records ( 7 ) for O. Obidoa
  E.E.J. Iweala and O. Obidoa
  This study investigated changes in some biochemical and histological parameters in male rats fed with an Ocimum gratissimum-supplemented diet for six months. Biochemical parameters studied include serum protein, cholesterol, lipid peroxidation, glutathione-S-transferase, superoxide dismutase, alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, haemoglobin and white blood cells. The histological characteristics of tissue sections of liver, intestines and testes were also examined. The weight of the animals increased significantly (p<0.05) over the control. There were also significant reductions (p<0.05) in serum protein, cholesterol, lipid peroxidation and haemoglobin in the animals. Superoxide dismutase was also significantly increased (p<0.05) while the changes in glutathione-S-transferase, alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase and alkaline phosphatase were not significant. White blood cell count was significantly increased (p<0.05). Histological changes in the intestines revealed the presence of increased villi and larger globlet cells. The testes also showed increased number of sperm cells and spermatogonia while there were no visible changes in the histology of the liver.
  Emeka E.J. Iweala , Friday O. Uhegbu and O. Obidoa
  Changes in some biochemical and haematological indices including serum protein, haemoglobin, cholesterol, lipid peroxidation, white blood cells, Glutathione-s-transferase, Superoxide dismutase, Alanine transaminase, Aspartate transaminase and Alkaline phosphatase were investigated in male rats fed with a diet supplemented with leaves of Gnetum africanum. The histological changes on the liver, intestines and testes were also examined. The long term feeding of the Gnetum africanum-supplemented diet caused significant increases (p<0.05) in weight, haemoglobin and white blood cells. There were also significant increases (p<0.05) in Glutathione-s-transferase and Superoxide dismutase enzymes. However, Gnetum africanum-supplemented diet caused a significant reduction (p<0.05) in serum protein and lipid peroxidation. The liver enzymes namely Alanine transaminase, Aspartate transaminase and Alkaline phosphatase were unaffected while the reduction in cholesterol was not significant. Histologically, the liver hepatocytes and hepatic plates were respectively elongated and enlarged while the intestinal mucosa showed elongated villi and enlarged submucosa. There were however no histological changes on the testes.
  A.C.C. Egbuonu , C.A. Ezeokonkwo , P.M. Ejikeme , O. Obidoa and L.U.S. Ezeanyika
  The present study is aimed at substantiating whether monosodium glutamate, MSG, could induce toxic effects at an appreciably lower dose and to examine the possible role of arginine, ARG, on such MSG-induced effects. Thus, MSG at a dose of 5 mg kg-1 body weight was administered to adult male Wistar rats by oral intubation. Treatment was daily and lasted for 28 days. The MSG treatment significantly (p<0.05) decreased the serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity (71.97%) but increased the activities of the serum total acid phosphatase (TAP) (6222.80%) and the serum Aspartate Amino Transferase (AST) (66.86%) and the serum aspartate aminotransferase-to-alanine aminotransferase (AST-to-ALT) ratio (56.59%). Arginine (ARG) (20 mg kg-1 b.wt.) co-administered with MSG significantly (p<0.05) decreased the serum Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP) activity (90.47%) representing a decrease of only 18.50% relative to the MSG-treatment alone, but increased the serum Total Acid Phosphatase (TAP) activity (11119.27%), the serum Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST) activity (133.35%) and the serum aspartate aminotransferase-to-alanine aminotransferase (AST-to-ALT) ratio (147.25%). The results showed that MSG at a dose of 5 mg kg-1 b.wt. probably affected the synthesis of the above enzymes and that ARG at 20 mg kg-1 b.wt. potentiated the MSG-induced effects. Thus, ARG at 20 mg kg-1 b.wt. may significantly exacerbate the possible MSG-induced adverse effect on the prostate and major organs with high metabolic activities especially the liver.
  E.J. Iweala Emeka and O. Obidoa
  This study investigated the effect of long term consumption of Gongronema latifolium on some biochemical and histological parameters in male rats. Biochemical parameters evaluated included serum protein, haemoglobin, cholesterol, lipid peroxidation, white blood cells, glutathione-s-transferase, superoxide dismutase, alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase and alkaline phosphatase. The histological changes of the liver, intestines and testes were examined. The long term feeding of a Gongronema latifolium -supplemented diet caused significant increases (p<0.05) in cholesterol, haemoglobin and white blood cells. The diet exhibited antioxidant properties by reducing lipid peroxidation and increasing superoxide dismutase activity. There was a significant increase (p<0.05) in glutathione-s-transferase and decrease in the liver enzymes namely Alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase and alkaline phosphatase suggesting a role of Gongronema latifolium in detoxification and hepatoprotection. However, Gongronema latifolium -supplemented diet did not cause any significant changes in weight and serum protein. The histology of the hepatic plate appeared irregular while the portal tracts showed a lifted basement membrane and few inflammatory cells. The intestinal mucosa showed an elongated and broadened villi. There were no histological changes on the testes.
  C.A. Anosike , O. Obidoa and L.U.S. Ezeanyika
  The effect of dietary incorporation of soybean, a high isoflavone-containing legume, on serum marker enzymes, lipid profile and relative organ weights of wistar rats was studied. Male wistar rats weighing between 100-200g were divided into four groups. Group 1 was fed normal rat chow while groups 2, 3 and 4 had normal rat chow supplemented with 10, 25 and 50% soybean, respectively, for fourteen days. At the end of the feeding experiment, the rats were euthanised by chloroform anesthesia and the serum obtained were used for the biochemical assays. In all cases, the rats had free access to feed and water. The results of the study showed that high intake of soybean (25% and 50%) in the diet significantly (P<0.05) reduced the level of the serum enzymes; glutamate – oxaloacetate and glutamate pyruvate transaminases, alkaline and acid phosphatases and serum glucose. Supplementation of soybean at these levels also increased serum vitamin C. Insignificant decreases were found in the liver, kidney and testis relative weights, serum low density lipoprotein and lipid peroxidation products (Malondialdehyde) levels. Soybean incorporation at the 50% level significantly reduced total serum cholesterol. These findings support the reports of the beneficial and health promoting effects of soybean.
  D. Dahiru and O. Obidoa
  Effects of aqueous extract of Ziziphus mauritiana (Zm) leaf on serum and liver cholesterol and triacylglycerol were studied in chronic alcohol administered rats. Pretreatment co-administration and post treatment protocols were employed. Rats fed alcohol only for 6 weeks had significantly (p<0.05) elevated levels of both serum and liver cholesterol and triglyceride. Pretreatment of rats with 400 mg/kg bw of aqueous extract of Zm leaf prior to alcohol administration significantly (p<0.05) inhibited both levels of serum and liver cholesterol and triglyceride. Co-administration of alcohol with 400 mg/kg bw aqueous extract of Zm leaf significantly (p<0.05) inhibited serum triglyceride level only. Post treatment of alcohol fed rats with 400 mg/kg aqueous extract of Zm for 2 weeks significantly (p<0.05) reduced the levels of both serum and liver cholesterol and triglyceride. Aqueous extract of Zm leaf can be used for the prevention and treatment of fatty liver, atherosclerosis and other diseases associated with high levels of cholesterol and triglyceride. Pretreatment was found to confer more protection than co-treatment, hence pretreatment should be preferred.
  A.C.C. Egbuonu , L.U.S. Ezeanyika , P.M. Ejikeme and O. Obidoa
  Adult male Wistar rats were fed with arginine (ARG) (60 mg kg¯1 b.wt.), glutamate (GLU) (90 mg kg¯1 b.wt.), monosodium glutamate (MSG) (15 mg kg¯1 b.wt.), ARG+GLU (60:90 mg kg¯1 b.wt.) or ARG+MSG (60:15 mg kg¯1 b.wt.). The feeding was by oral intubation and was daily for 28 days. The aim was to investigate possible alterations in the serum biochemistry and liver histology induced by ARG, GLU or MSG either alone or in such combinations as ARG+GLU or ARG+MSG. After 28 days oral treatment, rats treated with ARG, GLU or MSG alone significantly (p<0.05) increased the serum alkaline aminotransferase (ALT) activity, whereas rats co-treated with ARG and either GLU or MSG decreased (p<0.05) the serum ALT activity. In comparison with the control, the other treatment groups elicited a significant quantitative increase in the serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity and the computed AST:ALT ratio but, the observed increase in the ARG-treated group was consistently lower relative to the other groups. Liver sections of rats from the various treatment groups showed varying degrees of focally diffuse (random) hepatocellular necrosis. On the whole, the study suggests that sub-acute daily oral treatment of male Wistar rats with ARG, GLU or MSG alone or ARG together with GLU or MSG could possibly impair their physiological functions as evidenced in the significant alterations in the serum biochemistry and liver histology of this study. The results are considerably significant going by the possible inadvertent abuse of ARG, GLU and MSG alone or together in diets and drugs.
 
 
 
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