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Articles by N. Yoshida
Total Records ( 3 ) for N. Yoshida
  R. Bouchi , T. Babazono , N. Yoshida , I. Nyumura , K. Toya , T. Hayashi , K. Hanai , N. Tanaka , A. Ishii and Y. Iwamoto
  Aims  Silent cerebral infarction (SCI) is an independent risk factor for future symptomatic stroke. Although the prevalence of SCI is closely related to kidney function in non-diabetic individuals, evidence is lacking whether albuminuria and/or reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) independently increase the risk of SCI in diabetic patients. We therefore examined the relationships between albuminuria, eGFR and SCI in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).

Methods  We studied 786 T2DM patients with an eGFR ≥ 15 ml/min 1.73/m2, including 337 women and 449 men [mean (± sd), age 65 ± 11 years]. All patients underwent cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect SCI. GFR was estimated using the modified three-variable equation for Japanese subjects. Albuminuria was defined as a first morning urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) ≥ 30 mg/g.

Results  SCI was detected in 415 (52.8%) of the subjects. The prevalence of SCI was significantly associated with both elevated ACR and decreased eGFR in univariate analysis. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, urinary ACR remained independently associated with SCI after adjusting for conventional cardiovascular risk factors [odds ratio (OR) of urinary ACR per logarithmical value: 1.89, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.41-2.51, P < 0.001]; however, eGFR was no longer significantly associated with SCI (OR per ml/min 1.73/m2 = 0.99, 95% CI = 0.98-1.00, P = 0.095).

Conclusion  In conclusion, albuminuria but not decreased eGFR may be an independent predictor of prevalent SCI in patients with T2DM.

  N. Yoshida , M. Okubo , K. Ishiguro and Y. Mori
  Background  Insulin allergy is a not uncommon condition even though human insulin and insulin analogues are widely used. However, the development of insulin allergy after bone marrow transplantation has not been reported.

Case report  A 44-year-old Japanese woman had aplastic anaemia and secondary haemochromatosis. She was diagnosed with having diabetes at age 32 years and had been treated with human insulin. At age 34 years, bone marrow transplantation was performed. One year later, a rash and urticaria appeared immediately after insulin injections. Intracutaneous tests were positive for both human insulins and analogues, whereas the test for protamine was negative. Furthermore, an IgE-radioallergosorbent test against insulin was positive. Thus, we diagnosed the patient with having an IgE-mediated type I allergy against insulin. Insulin therapy with insulin aspart, which showed the least skin reaction, was continued and the insulin allergy disappeared in 7 years.

Conclusions  This is the first description of insulin allergy after bone marrow transplantation. Our case underscores the effects of bone marrow cells on IgE-mediated type I allergy for insulin.

  Y Fujimura , H Kitaura , M Yoshimatsu , T Eguchi , H Kohara , Y Morita and N. Yoshida
 

Mechanical stress such as orthodontic tooth movement induces osteoclastogenesis. Sometimes, excessive mechanical stress results in root resorption during orthodontic tooth movement. It has been reported that bisphosphonate inhibits osteoclastogenesis. Recently, there have been concerns for orthodontic patients receiving bisphosphonates. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bisphosphonates on orthodontic tooth movement and root resorption in mice.

A nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) closed coil spring delivering a force of 10 g was inserted between the upper anterior alveolar bone and the first molar in 8-week-old male C57BL/6 mice. Bisphosphonate (2 µg/20 µl) was injected daily into a local site adjacent to the upper molar. After 12 days, the distance the tooth had moved was measured. The number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells was counted as osteoclasts in histological sections. Root resorption was assessed by scanning electron microscopy. The data were analysed with a Student's t-test.

The orthodontic appliance increased the number of osteoclasts on the pressure side and mesial movement of the first molar. Bisphosphonates reduced the amount of tooth movement and the number of osteoclasts. In addition, they also reduced root resorption on the pressure side.

Bisphosphonates inhibit orthodontic tooth movement and prevent root resorption during orthodontic tooth movement in mice. These results suggest that bisphosphonates might have an inhibiting effect on root resorption during orthodontic tooth movement in humans and that they may interrupt tooth movement in orthodontic patients undergoing treatment, thus altering the outcome of treatment.

 
 
 
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