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Articles by N Kaludercic
Total Records ( 2 ) for N Kaludercic
  N Kaludercic , E Takimoto , T Nagayama , N Feng , E. W Lai , D Bedja , K Chen , K. L Gabrielson , R. D Blakely , J. C Shih , K Pacak , D. A Kass , F Di Lisa and N. Paolocci
 

Rationale: Monoamine oxidases (MAOs) are mitochondrial enzymes that catabolize prohypertrophic neurotransmitters, such as norepinephrine and serotonin, generating hydrogen peroxide. Because excess reactive oxygen species and catecholamines are major contributors to the pathophysiology of congestive heart failure, MAOs could play an important role in this process.

Objective: Here, we investigated the role of MAO-A in maladaptive hypertrophy and heart failure.

Methods and Results: We report that MAO-A activity is triggered in isolated neonatal and adult myocytes on stimulation with norepinephrine, followed by increase in cell size, reactive oxygen species production, and signs of maladaptive hypertrophy. All of these in vitro changes occur, in part, independently from - and β-adrenergic receptor–operated signaling and are inhibited by the specific MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline. In mice with left ventricular dilation and pump failure attributable to pressure overload, norepinephrine catabolism by MAO-A is increased accompanied by exacerbated oxidative stress. MAO-A inhibition prevents these changes, and also reverses fetal gene reprogramming, metalloproteinase and caspase-3 activation, as well as myocardial apoptosis. The specific role of MAO-A was further tested in mice expressing a dominant-negative MAO-A (MAO-Aneo), which were more protected against pressure overload than their wild-type littermates.

Conclusions: In addition to adrenergic receptor–dependent mechanisms, enhanced MAO-A activity coupled with increased intramyocardial norepinephrine availability results in augmented reactive oxygen species generation, contributing to maladaptive remodeling and left ventricular dysfunction in hearts subjected to chronic stress.

  G Agnetti , N Kaludercic , L. A Kane , S. T Elliott , Y Guo , K Chakir , D Samantapudi , N Paolocci , G. F Tomaselli , D. A Kass and J. E. Van Eyk
 

Background— Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) improves chamber mechanoenergetics and morbidity and mortality of patients manifesting heart failure with ventricular dyssynchrony; however, little is known about the molecular changes underlying CRT benefits. We hypothesized that mitochondria may play an important role because of their involvement in energy production.

Methods and Results— Mitochondria isolated from the left ventricle in a canine model of dyssynchronous or resynchronized (CRT) heart failure were analyzed by a classical, gel-based, proteomic approach. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that 31 mitochondrial proteins where changed when controlling the false discovery rate at 30%. Key enzymes in anaplerotic pathways, such as pyruvate carboxylation and branched-chain amino acid oxidation, were increased. These concerted changes, along with others, suggested that CRT may increase the pool of Krebs cycle intermediates and fuel oxidative phosphorylation. Nearly 50% of observed changes pertained to subunits of the respiratory chain. ATP synthase-β subunit of complex V was less degraded, and its phosphorylation modulated by CRT was associated with increased formation (2-fold, P=0.004) and specific activity (+20%, P=0.05) of the mature complex. The importance of these modifications was supported by coordinated changes in mitochondrial chaperones and proteases. CRT increased the mitochondrial respiratory control index with tightened coupling when isolated mitochondria were reexposed to substrates for both complex I (glutamate and malate) and complex II (succinate), an effect likely related to ATP synthase subunit modifications and complex quantity and activity.

Conclusions— CRT potently affects both the mitochondrial proteome and the performance associated with improved cardiac function.

 
 
 
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