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Articles by N Hayashi
Total Records ( 5 ) for N Hayashi
  T Yoshio , T Morita , M Tsujii , N Hayashi and K. Sobue
 

Two members of the myocardin protein family, myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF)-A and MRTF-B are co-activators of serum response factor (SRF). We recently reported that MRTF-A/B activates the transcription of several actin cytoskeletal/focal adhesion genes SRF dependently, thereby enhancing the formation of stress fibers and focal adhesions. Here, we showed that the levels of caldesmon and tropomyosin, both SRF/MRTF-regulated actin cytoskeletal proteins, were reduced in rat intestinal epithelial (RIE) cell lines that had been transformed with oncogenic ras (RIE-ras) or src (RIE-src) compared with their parental cell line. These cells exhibited morphological abnormalities associated with a disorganized actin cytoskeleton. The serum-stimulated nuclear translocation of MRTF-A/B was suppressed in the RIE-ras and RIE-src cells. However, the transient expression of constitutively active (CA) MRTF-A or MRTF-B reversed the reduced expression levels of caldesmon and tropomyosin and the associated morphological phenotypes. We isolated stable CA-MRTF-A-expressing cell lines from transfected RIE-ras and RIE-src cells and found that their levels of caldesmon and tropomyosin were close to those of untransformed RIE cells. Their morphologies were also normal, with a flattened cell shape and well-developed stress fibers. The CA-MRTF-A-expressing RIE-ras and RIE-src lines also showed lower invasiveness and anchorage-independent growth than their transformed parental cells, in vitro. In vivo, CA-MRTF-A expression suppressed tumor formation and reduced liver metastases. Therefore, we concluded that MRTF-A/B are potent repressors of cancer progression and metastasis and may be good targets for cancer therapy.

  M Kuroda Morimoto , H Tanaka , N Hayashi , M Nakahira , Y Imai , M Imamura , K Yasuda , S Yumikura Futatsugi , K Matsui , T Nakashima , K Sugimura , H Tsutsui , H Sano and K. Nakanishi
 

We previously reported that intranasal challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) plus IL-18 induces airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and eosinophilic airway inflammation in mice with OVA-specific Th1 cells. These two conditions can be prevented by neutralizing anti-IFN- and anti-IL-13 antibodies, respectively. The mice develop AHR and eosinophilic airway inflammation after challenge with OVA plus LPS instead of IL-18 and endogenous IL-18 is known to be involved. In contrast, IL-18 does not facilitate these changes in mice possessing OVA-specific Th2 cells. Here, we investigated whether IL-18 is involved in the development of asthma in mice immunized and challenged with bacterial proteins. Upon intranasal exposure to protein A (SpA) derived from Staphylococcus aureus, mice immunized with SpA exhibited AHR and peribronchial eosinophilic inflammation if IFN- or IL-13 were present, respectively. The CD4+ T cells from draining lymph nodes (DLNs) of the SpA-immunized and -challenged mice produced a robust IFN- and IL-13 in response to immobilized anti-CD3 antibodies. Treatment with neutralizing anti-IL-18 antibodies prevented asthmatic inflammation concomitant with their impaired potential to express IFN- and IL-13. Furthermore, naive mice that received the CD4+ T cells from DLNs of SpA-immunized mice developed airway inflammation depending upon the presence of IL-18. Immunodeficient mice that received human PBMCs, which had been stimulated with SpA in vitro, developed dense peribronchial accumulation of human CD4+ T cells upon SpA challenge. Neutralizing anti-human IL-18 antibodies protected against this airway inflammation. These results suggest the importance of IL-18 for the development of asthmatic inflammation associated with airway exposure to bacterial proteins.

  D Albinsky , M Kusano , M Higuchi , N Hayashi , M Kobayashi , A Fukushima , M Mori , T Ichikawa , K Matsui , H Kuroda , Y Horii , Y Tsumoto , H Sakakibara , H Hirochika , M Matsui and K. Saito
 

Plant metabolomics developed as a powerful tool to examine gene functions and to gain deeper insight into the physiology of the plant cell. In this study, we screened Arabidopsis lines overexpressing rice full-length (FL) cDNAs (rice FOX Arabidopsis lines) using a gas chromatography–time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC–TOF/MS)-based technique to identify rice genes that caused metabolic changes. This screening system allows fast and reliable identification of candidate lines showing altered metabolite profiles. We performed metabolomic and transcriptomic analysis of a rice FOX Arabidopsis line that harbored the FL cDNA of the rice ortholog of the Lateral Organ Boundaries (LOB) Domain (LBD)/Asymmetric Leaves2-like (ASL) gene of Arabidopsis, At-LBD37/ASL39. The investigated rice FOX Arabidopsis line showed prominent changes in the levels of metabolites related to nitrogen metabolism. The transcriptomic data as well as the results from the metabolite analysis of the Arabidopsis At-LBD37/ASL39-overexpressor plants were consistent with these findings. Furthermore, the metabolomic and transcriptomic analysis of the Os-LBD37/ASL39-overexpressing rice plants indicated that Os-LBD37/ASL39 is associated with processes related to nitrogen metabolism in rice. Thus, the combination of a metabolomics-based screening method and a gain-of-function approach is useful for rapid characterization of novel genes in both Arabidopsis and rice.

  A Hirata , K Yamazaki , S Hamada , Y Kamimura , H Tarao , K Wake , Y Suzuki , N Hayashi and O. Fujiwara
 

The present study provides an intercomparison of the induced quantities in a human model for uniform magnetic field exposures at extremely low frequency. A total of six research groups have cooperated in this joint intercomparison study. The computational conditions and numeric human phantom including the conductivity of tissue were set identically to focus on the uncertainty in computed fields. Differences in the maximal and 99th percentile value of the in situ electric field were less than 30 and 10 % except for the results of one group. Differences in the current density averaged over 1 cm2 of the central nerve tissue are 10 % or less except for the results of one group. This comparison suggests that the computational uncertainty of the in situ electric field/current density due to different methods and coding is smaller than that caused by different human phantoms and the conductivitys of tissue, which was reported in a previous study.

  S Kawaoka , N Hayashi , Y Suzuki , H Abe , S Sugano , Y Tomari , T Shimada and S. Katsuma
 

Genetic studies and large-scale sequencing experiments have revealed that the PIWI subfamily proteins and PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) play an important role in germ line development and transposon control. Biochemical studies in vitro have greatly contributed to the understanding of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) pathways. However, in vitro analyses of the piRNA pathway have been thus far quite challenging, because their expression is largely restricted to the germ line. Here we report that Bombyx mori ovary-derived cultured cell line, BmN4, endogenously expresses two PIWI subfamily proteins, silkworm Piwi (Siwi) and Ago3 (BmAgo3), and piRNAs associated with them. Siwi-bound piRNAs have a strong bias for uridine at their 5' end and BmAgo3-bound piRNAs are enriched for adenine at position 10. In addition, Siwi preferentially binds antisense piRNAs, whereas BmAgo3 binds sense piRNAs. Moreover, we identified many pairs in which Siwi-bound antisense and BmAgo3-bound sense piRNAs are overlapped by precisely 10 nt at their 5' ends. These signatures are known to be important for secondary piRNA biogenesis in other organisms. Taken together, BmN4 is a unique cell line in which both primary and secondary steps of piRNA biogenesis pathways are active. This cell line would provide useful tools for analysis of piRNA biogenesis and function.

 
 
 
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