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Articles by N Ahuja
Total Records ( 3 ) for N Ahuja
  N Ahuja and A. J. Cole
 

Presence of fever in psychiatric patients may signify a number of potentially fatal conditions. Several of these are related to treatments (e.g. neuroleptic malignant syndrome with antipsychotics, serotonin syndrome with serotonergic antidepressants, and malignant hyperpyrexia with anaesthesia used for administration of electroconvulsive therapy) or exacerbated by them (e.g. malignant catatonia with antipsychotics). New classes of drug treatment may be changing the epidemiology of these disorders. We suggest that an initial diagnosis of hyperthermia syndrome is clinically useful as there are some important commonalities in treatment. We outline a systematic approach to identify a particular subtype of hyperthermia syndrome and the indications for more specific treatments where available.

  A Stojadinovic , N Ahuja , S. M Nazarian , D. L Segev , L Jacobs , Y Wang , J Eberhardt and M. A. Zeiger
 

Objective  To review cutting-edge, novel, implemented and potential translational research and to provide a glimpse into rich, innovative, and brilliant approaches to everyday surgical problems.

Data Sources  Scientific literature and unpublished results.

Study Selection  Articles reviewed were chosen based on innovation and application to surgical diseases.

Data Extraction  Each section was written by a surgeon familiar with cutting-edge and novel research in their field of expertise and interest.

Data Synthesis  Articles that met criteria were summarized in the manuscript.

Conclusions  Multiple avenues have been used for the discovery of improved means of diagnosis, treatment, and overall management of patients with surgical diseases. These avenues have incorporated the use of genomics, electrical impedence, statistical and mathematical modeling, and immunology.

  A. J Hayanga , D Mukherjee , D Chang , H Kaiser , T Lee , S Gearhart , N Ahuja and J. Freischlag
 

Objective  To compare risk- and volume-adjusted outcomes of colon resections performed at teaching hospitals (THs) vs non-THs to assess whether benign disease may influence the volume-outcome effect.

Design  Retrospective data analysis examining colon resections determined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification classification performed in the United States from 2001 through 2005 using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) and the Area Resource File (2004). Patient covariates used in adjustment included age, sex, race, Charlson Index comorbidity score, and insurance status. Hospital covariates included TH status, presence of a colorectal surgery fellowship approved by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, geographical region, institutional volume, and urban vs rural location. County-specific surgeon characteristics used in adjustment included average age of surgeons and proportion of colorectal board-certified surgeons within each county. Environmental or county covariates included median income and percentage of county residents living below the federal poverty level.

Setting  A total of 1045 hospitals located in 38 states in the United States that were included in the NIS.

Patients  All patients older than 18 years who had colon resection and were discharged from a hospital included in the NIS.

Main Outcome Measures  Operative mortality, length of stay (LOS), and total charges.

Results  A total of 115 250 patients were identified, of whom 4371 died (3.8%). The mean LOS was 10 days. Fewer patients underwent surgical resection in THs than in non-THs (46 656 vs 68 589). Teaching hospitals were associated with increased odds of death (odds ratio, 1.14) (P = .03), increased LOS (P = .003), and a nonsignificant trend toward an increase in total charges (P = .36).

Conclusions  With the inclusion of benign disease, colon surgery displays a volume-outcome relationship in favor of non-THs. Inclusion of benign disease may represent a tipping point.

 
 
 
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