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Articles by Mirza Hapsari Sakti Titis Penggalih
Total Records ( 3 ) for Mirza Hapsari Sakti Titis Penggalih
  Yuni Afriani , Kurniasari Rofianti Putri , Mirza Hapsari Sakti Titis Penggalih , Istiti Kandarina and Zaenal Muttaqien Sofro
  Banana isotonic drink is a potential beverage which has positive effect to maintain blood circulation. To make an improvement of product, clinical trials must be done in humans to know the effects of rehydration based on electrolyte analysis. This study used cross-over design with 7 days of washed out periods. Sixteen respondents, aged up to 20 years old and passed the selection of orthostatic test, were involved in this study. Changes in urine and blood electrolyte levels were checked before and after intervention. Electrolyte, include sodium, chloride and potassium, were measured using Easylyte. Data were analyzed with paired t-test and independent sample test. There were significant differences of urine level of chloride and sodium (p<0.05) after consumption plain water and banana isotonic drink. However, there was no significant difference (p>0.05) in urine level of potassium. Urine electrolyte decreased in all group after intervention. Meanwhile, potassium level increased after consumption banana isotonic drink. There were significant differences of chloride blood level (p<0.05) between plain water and banana isotonic drink. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) in blood level of potassium and sodium. Blood level of sodium and chloride decreased in all group. Meanwhile, potassium level increased after consumption banana isotonic drink. Banana isotonic drink was effective to maintain level of electrolyte in body by decreasing the level of electrolyte in urine output and improve potassium level.
  Harry Freitag Luglio , Fatma Zuhrotun` Nisa , Mirza Hapsari Sakti Titis Penggalih , Siti Helmyati , Lily Arsanti , Siti Budi Utami , Intan Esa Putri , Mutiara Tirta , Susetyowati , Emy Huriyati and Toto Sudargo
  Background: Socioeconomic status (SES) has an important role in defining trend of obesity and it is believed that rich people of poor countries who live in urban areas show high rate of obesity. However, there is a controversy regarding the role of socioeconomic factors on overweight and obesity of people living in rural areas. Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of socioeconomic factors on the prevalence of obesity in women living in Raas and Sapudi islands that represents Indonesian rural areas. Materials and Methods: A total of 376 housewives, living in remote Indonesian islands (Raas and Sapudi), took part in this cross sectional study. In this study, nutritional status measurements, interviews and observations done by trained enumerators. A student’s t-test was used to compare differences of socioeconomic factors among women with and without overweight/obesity. Results: Distance to the food source and expenses to buy food were related to overweight/obesity (p<0.05). Additionally, overweight/obese women were married at a younger age compared to those women who were not overweight (16±3 yo vs. 17±6 yo, p = 0.008). Economic status, such as monthly income and possession of the farm or ranch was not associated with overweight/obesity. However, women who work outside home were less likely to become overweight/obese (OR: 0.321; p = 0.001). Conclusion: The prevalence of obesity in women living in those remote islands was at an alarming rate and socioeconomic factors also have an important role in the prevalence of obesity.
  Mirza Hapsari Sakti Titis Penggalih , Mohammad Juffrie , Toto Sudargo and Zaenal Muttaqien Sofro
  Background and Objective: Factors that influence athletes’ physical performance include somatic factors, training adaptation, nutrition, cigarette, alcohol and caffeine consumption habits and psychological factors. As one of the elements that affect an athlete’s performance, nutrition is often overlooked by athletes, trainers and stakeholders in Indonesia. This study aimed to determine the relationship between nutritional status, exercise and cigarette, alcohol and caffeine consumption habits and youth soccer athletes’ performance. Methods: This observational study used a longitudinal cohort design. Subjects were observed for a 4 months period. A total of 131 youth soccer athletes participated in the study. Bivariate analysis was used to determine the relationship between all the predictor variables and the athletes’ performance using Pearson’s correlation coefficient and multiple regression tests. Results: Anthropometric measurements, biochemical, clinical, food and fluid intake factors were found to be significantly related to maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) (p<0.05). Anthropometric, biochemical, clinical, food and fluid intake factors had an effect on VO2 max: r = 0.552, r = 0.215, r = 0.424 and r = 0.553, respectively. The correlations across all variables were significant (p = 0.000), with a value of r = 0.698, if smoking habits, alcohol consumption, caffeine and exercise factors were neglected. The r-value increased to r = 0.706 for the following variables, smoking habits, alcohol consumption and caffeine consumption. The r-value increased to r = 0.725 by adding the exercise factor. Furthermore, it was found that variable body mass index (BMI) for age, ectomorph body type, heart rate, fluid intake and exercise were the main factors affecting VO2 max (p<0.05). Conclusion: Nutritional factors (69.8%) were found to have the greatest impact on an athlete’s performance. The nutritional factors that had the greatest impact on performance are: BMI for age, ectomorph body type, heart rate and fluid intake without ignoring the exercise factor. Exercise and nutritional factors were found to have a 72.5% impact on an athlete’s performance.
 
 
 
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