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Articles by Mary Ganguli
Total Records ( 3 ) for Mary Ganguli
  David S. Knopman , Ronald C. Petersen , Walter A. Rocca , Eric B. Larson and Mary Ganguli
  Passive surveillance for disease is a public health approach that relies on documentation available within existing health records for the region or community being studied. Its two primary advantages over active case-finding are the lower cost of research and the lower burden on the population under study. The effectiveness of passive case-finding depends on the comprehensiveness of the healthcare coverage in a given community and the adequacy of the available medical records. The Rochester Epidemiology Project has permitted dementia case detection for Olmsted County, Minnesota, using a medical records-linkage system. These data were compared with case ascertainment using direct assessment of individuals in an epidemiological study of the same community. At the Group Health Research Institute, investigators compared dementia and Alzheimer‘s disease cases detected using an electronic medical record database search with those identified by a parallel active case-finding study. In this article, the advantages and disadvantages of passive case-finding were discussed, and the following conclusion was drawn: the purpose of the study being conducted should determine the case-finding approach that is to be used.
  David R. Weir , Robert B. Wallace , Kenneth M. Langa , Brenda L. Plassman , Robert S. Wilson , David A. Bennett , Ranjan Duara , David Loewenstein , Mary Ganguli and Mary Sano
  Establishing methods for ascertainment of dementia and cognitive impairment that are accurate and also cost-effective is a challenging enterprise. Large population-based studies often using administrative data sets offer relatively inexpensive and reliable estimates of severe conditions including moderate to advanced dementia that are useful for public health planning, but they can miss less severe cognitive impairment which may be the most effective point for intervention. Clinical and epidemiological cohorts, intensively assessed, provide more sensitive detection of less severe cognitive impairment but are often costly. In this article, several approaches to ascertainment are evaluated for validity, reliability, and cost. In particular, the methods of ascertainment from the Health and Retirement Study are described briefly, along with those of the Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study (ADAMS). ADAMS, a resource-intense sub-study of the Health and Retirement Study, was designed to provide diagnostic accuracy among persons with more advanced dementia. A proposal to streamline future ADAMS assessments is offered. Also considered are algorithmic and Web-based approaches to diagnosis that can reduce the expense of clinical expertise and, in some contexts, can reduce the extent of data collection. These approaches are intended for intensively assessed epidemiological cohorts where goal is valid and reliable case detection with efficient and cost-effective tools.
  Hiroko H. Dodge , Chung-Chou H. Chang , Ilyas M. Kamboh and Mary Ganguli
  Background Although Alzheimer‘s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, there is growing interest in the influence of vascular factors on its incidence. Methods In a population-based longitudinal epidemiological study, we fit Cox proportional hazard models to examine the risk of incident dementia and AD associated with self-reported vascular disease. The population-attributable risk percent (percent of the incidence of dementia and AD in the population that would be eliminated if vascular disease was eliminated) was calculated using the adjusted hazard ratios (HR). Results Of 822 eligible participants, 94 individuals developed incident dementia, with 79 having AD (probable/possible AD) during the follow-up period of on average 8 years. Stroke/transient ischemic attack history was associated with incident dementia (HR = 2.6) as well as AD (HR = 2.4) among non-apolipoprotein E ɛ4 carriers. Conclusions At the community level, the risk of dementia could be potentially reduced by 10.8% by eliminating overt cerebrovascular disease, and the risk of AD by 9.1% for non-apolipoprotein E ɛ4 carriers.
 
 
 
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