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Articles by Mark A. Sager
Total Records ( 4 ) for Mark A. Sager
  David L. Weimer and Mark A. Sager
  Background Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that places substantial burdens on those who provide support for family members with declining cognitive and functional abilities. Many AD patients eventually require formal long-term care services because of the absence, exhaustion, or inability of family members to provide care. The costs of long-term care, and especially nursing home care, often deplete private financial resources, placing a substantial burden on state Medicaid programs. Current evidence suggests that pharmacological treatments and caregiver interventions can delay entry into nursing homes and potentially reduce Medicaid costs. However, these cost savings are not being realized because many patients with AD are either not diagnosed or diagnosed at late stages of the disease, and have no access to Medicare-funded caregiver support programs. Methods and Results A Monte Carlo cost-benefit analysis, based on estimates of parameters available in the medical literature, suggests that the early identification and treatment of AD have the potential to result in large, positive net social benefits as well as positive net savings for states and the federal government. Conclusions These findings indicate that the early diagnosis and treatment of AD are not only socially desirable in terms of increasing economic efficiency, but also fiscally attractive from both state and federal perspectives. These findings also suggest that failure to fund effective caregiver interventions may be fiscally unsound.
  Zaven S. Khachaturian , Deborah Barnes , Richard Einstein , Sterling Johnson , Virginia Lee , Allen Roses , Mark A. Sager , William R. Shankle , Peter J. Snyder , Ronald C. Petersen , Gerard Schellenberg , John Trojanowski , Paul Aisen , Marilyn S. Albert , John C.S. Breitner , Neil Buckholtz , Maria Carrillo , Steven Ferris , Barry D. Greenberg , Michael Grundman , Ara S. Khachaturian , Lewis H. Kuller , Oscar L. Lopez , Paul Maruff , Richard C. Mohs , Marcelle Morrison- Bogorad , Creighton Phelps , Eric Reiman , Marwan Sabbagh , Mary Sano , Lon S. Schneider , Eric Siemers , Pierre Tariot , Jacques Touchon , Bruno Vellas and Lisa J. Bain
  Among the major impediments to the design of clinical trials for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most critical is the lack of validated biomarkers, assessment tools, and algorithms that would facilitate identification of asymptomatic individuals with elevated risk who might be recruited as study volunteers. Thus, the Leon Thal Symposium 2009 (LTS'09), on October 27–28, 2009 in Las Vegas, Nevada, was convened to explore strategies to surmount the barriers in designing a multisite, comparative study to evaluate and validate various approaches for detecting and selecting asymptomatic people at risk for cognitive disorders/dementia. The deliberations of LTS'09 included presentations and reviews of different approaches (algorithms, biomarkers, or measures) for identifying asymptomatic individuals at elevated risk for AD who would be candidates for longitudinal or prevention studies. The key nested recommendations of LTS'09 included: (1) establishment of a National Database for Longitudinal Studies as a shared research core resource; (2) launch of a large collaborative study that will compare multiple screening approaches and biomarkers to determine the best method for identifying asymptomatic people at risk for AD; (3) initiation of a Global Database that extends the concept of the National Database for Longitudinal Studies for longitudinal studies beyond the United States; and (4) development of an educational campaign that will address public misconceptions about AD and promote healthy brain aging.
  Sterling C. Johnson , Asenath La Rue , Bruce P. Hermann , Guofan Xu , Rebecca L. Koscik , Erin M. Jonaitis , Barbara B. Bendlin , Kirk J. Hogan , Allen D. Roses , Ann M. Saunders , Michael W. Lutz , Sanjay Asthana , Robert C. Green and Mark A. Sager
  Objective Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotypes are associated with variable risk of developing late-onset Alzheimer‘s disease (LOAD), with APOE epsilon 4 (APOE ɛ4) having higher risk. A variable poly-T length polymorphism at rs10524523, within intron 6 of the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOMM40) gene, has been shown to influence age of onset in LOAD, with very long (VL) poly-T length associated with earlier disease onset, and short poly-T length associated with later onset. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that brain and cognitive changes suggestive of presymptomatic LOAD may be associated with this TOMM40 polymorphism. Methods Among healthy APOE ɛ3 homozygous adults (N = 117; mean age, 55 years), we compared those who were homozygous for VL/VL (n = 35) TOMM40 poly-T lengths (who were presumably at higher risk) with those homozygous for short (S/S; n = 38) poly-T lengths, as well as those with heterozygous (S/VL; n = 44) poly-T length polymorphisms, on measures of learning and memory and on structural brain imaging. Results The VL/VL group showed lower performance than the S/S TOMM40 group on primacy retrieval from a verbal list learning task, a finding which is also seen in early Alzheimer‘s disease. A dose-dependent increase in the VL TOMM40 polymorphism (from no VL alleles, to S/VL heterozygous, to VL/VL homozygous) was associated with decreasing gray matter volume in the ventral posterior cingulate and medial ventral precuneus, a region of the brain affected early in LOAD. Conclusions These findings among APOE ɛ3/ɛ3 late middle-aged adults suggest that a subgroup with VL TOMM40 poly-T lengths may be experiencing incipient LOAD-related cognitive and brain changes.
  Mary D. Naylor , Jason H. Karlawish , Steven E. Arnold , Ara S. Khachaturian , Zaven S. Khachaturian , Virginia M.-Y. Lee , Matthew Baumgart , Sube Banerjee , Cornelia Beck , Kaj Blennow , Ron Brookmeyer , Kurt R. Brunden , Kathleen C. Buckwalter , Meryl Comer , Kenneth Covinsky , Lynn Friss Feinberg , Giovanni Frisoni , Colin Green , Renato Maia Guimaraes , Lisa P. Gwyther , Franz F. Hefti , Michael Hutton , Claudia Kawas , David M. Kent , Lewis Kuller , Kenneth M. Langa , Robert W. Mahley , Katie Maslow , Colin L. Masters , Diane E. Meier , Peter J. Neumann , Steven M. Paul , Ronald C. Petersen , Mark A. Sager , Mary Sano , Dale Schenk , Holly Soares , Reisa A. Sperling , Sidney M. Stahl , Vivianna van Deerlin , Yaakov Stern , David Weir , David A. Wolk and John Q. Trojanowski
  To address the pending public health crisis due to Alzheimer‘s disease (AD) and related neurodegenerative disorders, the Marian S. Ware Alzheimer Program at the University of Pennsylvania held a meeting entitled "State of the Science Conference on the Advancement of Alzheimer's Diagnosis, Treatment and Care," on June 21-22, 2012. The meeting comprised four workgroups focusing on Biomarkers; Clinical Care and Health Services Research; Drug Development; and Health Economics, Policy, and Ethics. The workgroups shared, discussed, and compiled an integrated set of priorities, recommendations, and action plans, which are presented in this article.
 
 
 
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