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Articles by Maria Endo Mahata
Total Records ( 7 ) for Maria Endo Mahata
  Zurmiati , Wizna , M. Hafil Abbas and Maria Endo Mahata
  Background and Objective: The Pitalah duck is one of Indonesia’s native ducks that has a uniform physical form and a genetic composition that is well adapted to environmental conditions. However, the Pitalah duck has a high feed conversion, so it is necessary to improve its feed efficiency. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the balance of energy and protein in the diet, which includes a probiotic, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (B. amyloliquefaciens), on the performance of the Pitalah duck. Methodology In this study a 3×3 group-randomized factorial design was employed that included 2 factors with 3 groups of body weight as replicates. Factor A is the energy level (E1: 2800, E2: 2700 and E3: 2600 kcal kg–1) and factor B is the protein level (P1: 18, P2: 17 and P3: 16%). Live weight, percentage of carcass, percentage of abdominal fat and income over feed cost were the measured variables. Results: The results showed that the combination of energy level and protein level and an interaction between these factors had a significant impact (p<0.05) on the live weight, percentage of carcass, percentage of abdominal fat and increased income over feed cost. Conclusion: The combination of energy and protein, along with administering 2000 ppm of the probiotic B. amyloliquefaciens, can improve the efficiency of the ration while decreasing the need for duck ration energy by 3.57% and decreasing the protein requirement by 5.56% at an energy level of 2700 kcal kg–1 and 17% protein in the ration.
  Yelsi listiana Dewi , Ahadiyah Yuniza , Nuraini , Kesuma Sayuti and Maria Endo Mahata
  Background and Objective: In certain coastal areas of Indonesia, Sargassum binderi drifts to the shore because of ocean waves and because people do not use it, becomes useless waste. This seaweed could potentially be used as feed for laying hens because certain bioactive compounds in seaweed, such as alginate, fucoidan, fucoxanthin and poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), are useful for poultry health. High salt content is a problem with using Sargassum binderi as poultry feed because it causes diarrhea and death in poultry. Therefore, the salt content of Sargassum binderi should be reduced before it is fed to poultry. The purpose of this study was to reduce the salt content of Sargassum binderi for use as feed for laying hens. Materials and Methods: The experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design with Sargassum binderi immersed in flowing river water for durations of 0, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 19, 21 and 23 h, each treatment was repeated 3 times. The measured variables were salt, crude protein, total dry matter, organic matter and ash. Results: The results showed that the different immersion durations of Sargassum binderi in flowing river water significantly affected (p<0.05) the reduction of salt, total dry matter and ash content and also significantly affected (p<0.05) the increase in organic matter and crude protein. Conclusion: The immersion of Sargassum binderi in flowing river water for 15 h was the best treatment to lower salt, total dry matter and ash and to increase the organic matter and crude protein content.
  Yusuf Mahlil , Husmaini , Warnita , Mirzah and Maria Endo Mahata
  Background and Objective: The processing of dragon fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus) into a food product leaves fruit peel waste, which is a potential feed for laying hens. Dragon fruit peel contains phytochemical compounds such as anthocyanins, beta-carotene and lycopene, which are reported to have antioxidant functions and to lower cholesterol in blood serum. Previous study showed that the problem with using dragon fruit peel as feed for laying hens was due to its high content of crude fiber, which inhibited the amount of its utilization in the poultry diet and lowered its phytochemical absorption in the digestive tract. Physical and chemical methods, such as steaming and soaking in acid solution, could reportedly degrade and lower the crude fiber content in feed containing high levels of crude fiber. The goal of this study was to evaluate the nutrient content of dragon fruit peel, particularly its crude fiber content, after processing with physical and chemical methods, to determine its use in feed for laying hens. Materials and Methods: The dragon fruit peels in this experiment were collected from local restaurants in Indonesia. The experiment consisted of 2 parts. In part one, dragon fruit peels were steamed in boiling water at a temperature of 98°C. It was performed in a completely randomized design, with different steaming times (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 min) and each treatment was replicated 4 times. Then the dry matter, crude fiber and crude protein were measured. In the second part, the dragon fruit peels were treated by soaking in 7.5% acetic acid (pH 4). The experiment was performed in a completely randomized design with different soaking times (0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 h) and each treatment was replicated 4 times. The dry matter, crude fiber and crude protein were measured. Results: The experiment showed that both the physical and chemical methods highly significantly reduced the crude fiber content of dragon fruit peel (p<0.01) but did not significantly affect the dry matter or protein content of dragon fruit peel (p>0.05). Conclusion: Processing dragon fruit peels by using a physical method (steaming for 20 min) and a chemical method (soaking in acetic acid solution for 4 h) lowered the crude fiber content in dragon fruit peel from 24.01-19.81% and from 24.01-20.39%, respectively, without altering the protein and dry matter content of dragon fruit peel.
  Ulvi Fitri Handayani , Wizna , Irfan Suliansyah , Yose Rizal and Maria Endo Mahata
  Objective: An experiment had been conducted to evaluate the nutrient content of tomato waste for laying hen feed after treating tomato waste with different heating methods. Materials and Methods: The tomato waste used in this experiment was comprised of rejected fresh tomatoes from traditional markets. An experiment was performed in a 2×5 factorial arrangement using a completely randomized design (CRD) with 3 replicates. The first factor consisted of two different heating methods (steaming and boiling) and the second factor consisted of five heating durations (0, 4, 8, 12 and 16 min). The measured variables were lycopene (mg/100 g), dry matter (%), organic matter (%), ash (%) and nutrient content of tomato waste [crude protein (%) and crude fiber (%)]. Results: There was no interaction (p>0.05) between heating method and heating duration for lycopene, dry matter, crude protein, crude fiber, organic matter or ash content, while heating method significantly affected (p<0.05) organic matter and ash content. The heating duration also significantly affected (p<0.05) lycopene, dry matter, crude protein, crude fiber, organic matter and ash content of tomato waste. Boiling was better than steaming for organic matter content, while steaming was better than boiling for ash content. Crude protein and crude fiber in boiling and steaming treatments were not different. The heating duration also significantly affected (p<0.05) lycopene, dry matter, crude protein, crude fiber, organic matter and ash content of tomato waste. A heating duration of 12 min increased lycopene and organic matter content and maintained the crude protein content. Conclusion: Steaming was the appropriate method for heating tomato waste based on ash content. Heating tomato waste for 12 min was the appropriate method for increasing lycopene and organic matter content and maintaining the crude protein content.
  Maria Endo Mahata , Ardi and Yose Rizal
  Background and Objective: Areca catechu L. is an herbal plant that contains polyphenol (flavonoids and tannin) and alkaloid (arecholine, arecolidine, guvacoline, guvacine and isoguvacine) compounds. Both polyphenols and alkaloids are known to be anthelmintic as well as antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and cholesterol lowering compounds for poultry and dogs. When Areca catechu L. seeds are harvested, they produce 76% Areca catechu L. peel waste, which can be potentially used as a poultry feed additive to increase poultry performance. Areca catechu L. peel waste contains as much as 1.693% total polyphenols, 1.383% total alkaloids, 1.466% catechins and 456.59 mg/100 g tannins. The utilization of Areca catechu L. peel waste as a poultry feed additive is limited due to the high crude fiber content, which can be as high as 47.02%; the poultry digestive tract does not produce cellulase to hydrolyze crude fiber. The fermentation of Areca catechu peel waste with a local microorganism solution that produces cellulase is one solution for lowering crude fiber in Areca catechu L. peel waste. This experiment was performed to select the best local microorganism solution from different sources as a crude fiber digester in Areca catechu peel waste to produce poultry feed additives. Materials and Methods: This experiment was performed with a completely randomized design using five different sources of local microorganism solutions derived from bamboo sprouts, banana corms, mixed fruit waste, mixed vegetable waste and rice waste. As much as 500 mL of each local microorganism solution was used to ferment 200 g of Areca catechu L. peel waste for 2 weeks and each treatment was repeated four times. Crude fiber and dry matter were the parameters in this experiment and the total number of colonies of bacteria and fungi was calculated before and after fermentation with each local microorganism solution. Results: The fermentation of Areca catechu L. peel waste with different sources of local microorganism solutions significantly lowered crude fiber and dry matter (p<0.05) and the total number of colonies of bacteria and fungi decreased after the fermentation process, except for the colony of bacteria and fungi in the local microorganism solution from bamboo sprouts, which increased. Conclusion: Mixed vegetable waste was the best source of local microorganism solutions for lowering crude fiber in Areca catechu L. peel waste and the crude fiber decreased from 47.02-25.95%.
  Maria Endo Mahata , Abdi Dharma , H. Irsan Ryanto and Yose Rizal
  The objective of this study is to measure the effect of substituting different levels of shrimp waste hydrolysate (SWH) from Penaeus merguensis for fish meal (FM) in broiler diet. The broilers were randomly assigned in 4 different levels of SWH (0, 4, 8, and 12%) in experimental diet with a Completely Randomized Design. Each dietary treatment was replicated five times. The result of this experiment indicated that weight gain, feed conversion, and percentage nitrogen retention were affected significantly (P<0.05), and no significant differences were found for feed consumption, percentage carcass, percentage abdomen fat, and digestive organ size (liver, proventriculus, gizzard, cecum, and pancreas). The inclusion of SWH until 8% in broiler diet kept the weight gain and feed conversion stable as well as FM in diet, however the inclusion to 12% decreased weight gain and negative effect in feed conversion. In conclusion, SWH could be included to 8% in broiler`s diet or substitute FM as alternative of animal protein source as much as 40%.
  Maria Endo Mahata
  An experiment was conducted with 80 unsexed broilers of Arbor Acress CP 707 strain to determine the effect of shrimp waste hydrolysate on tibia bone weight, calcium and phosphorus content. This study involved a Completely Randomized Design (CRD) with 4 treatments (0, 4, 8 and 12% of shrimp waste hydrolysate) and 5 replicates for each treatment. Diets were isonitrogenous (22% of crude protein) and isocaloric (2900 kcal/kg diet). Measured variables were weight of tibia bone, calcium and phosphorus content of tibia bone. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance for CRD. Result shown that increasing of shrimp waste hydrolysate levels in diet had no effect (p>0.05) on tibia bone weight and calcium content, but decreasing of phosphorous content (p<0.01). In conclusion, the utilization of shrimp waste hydrolysate up to 12% in broiler diet had no affected on weight and calcium of tibia bone but decreased phosphorous content.
 
 
 
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