Asian Science Citation Index is committed to provide an authoritative, trusted and significant information by the coverage of the most important and influential journals to meet the needs of the global scientific community.  
ASCI Database
308-Lasani Town,
Sargodha Road,
Faisalabad, Pakistan
Fax: +92-41-8815544
Contact Via Web
Suggest a Journal
 
Articles by Marc Cantillon
Total Records ( 3 ) for Marc Cantillon
  Clifford R. Jack , Frederik Barkhof , Matt A. Bernstein , Marc Cantillon , Patricia E. Cole , Charles DeCarli , Bruno Dubois , Simon Duchesne , Nick C. Fox , Giovanni B. Frisoni , Harald Hampel , Derek L.G. Hill , Keith Johnson , Jean-Francois Mangin , Philip Scheltens , Adam J. Schwarz , Reisa Sperling , Joyce Suhy , Paul M. Thompson , Michael Weiner and Norman L. Foster
  Background The promise of Alzheimer‘s disease biomarkers has led to their incorporation in new diagnostic criteria and in therapeutic trials; however, significant barriers exist to widespread use. Chief among these is the lack of internationally accepted standards for quantitative metrics. Hippocampal volumetry is the most widely studied quantitative magnetic resonance imaging measure in Alzheimer‘s disease and thus represents the most rational target for an initial effort at standardization. Methods and Results The authors of this position paper propose a path toward this goal. The steps include the following: (1) Establish and empower an oversight board to manage and assess the effort, (2) adopt the standardized definition of anatomic hippocampal boundaries on magnetic resonance imaging arising from the European Alzheimer‘s Disease Centers–Alzheimer‘s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative hippocampal harmonization effort as a reference standard, (3) establish a scientifically appropriate, publicly available reference standard data set based on manual delineation of the hippocampus in an appropriate sample of subjects (Alzheimer‘s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative), and (4) define minimum technical and prognostic performance metrics for validation of new measurement techniques using the reference standard data set as a benchmark. Conclusions Although manual delineation of the hippocampus is the best available reference standard, practical application of hippocampal volumetry will require automated methods. Our intent was to establish a mechanism for credentialing automated software applications to achieve internationally recognized accuracy and prognostic performance standards that lead to the systematic evaluation and then widespread acceptance and use of hippocampal volumetry. The standardization and assay validation process outlined for hippocampal volumetry was envisioned as a template that could be applied to other imaging biomarkers.
  Adam L. Boxer , Michael Gold , Edward Huey , Fen-Biao Gao , Edward A. Burton , Tiffany Chow , Aimee Kao , Blair R. Leavitt , Bruce Lamb , Megan Grether , David Knopman , Nigel J. Cairns , Ian R. Mackenzie , Laura Mitic , Erik D. Roberson , Daniel Van Kammen , Marc Cantillon , Kathleen Zahs , Stephen Salloway , John Morris , Gary Tong , Howard Feldman , Howard Fillit , Susan Dickinson , Zaven Khachaturian , Margaret Sutherland , Robert Farese , Bruce L. Miller and Jeffrey Cummings
  Frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) is a common cause of dementia for which there are currently no approved therapies. Over the past decade, there has been an explosion of knowledge about the biology and clinical features of FTD that has identified a number of promising therapeutic targets as well as animal models in which to develop drugs. The close association of some forms of FTD with neuropathological accumulation of tau protein or increased neuroinflammation due to progranulin protein deficiency suggests that a drug's success in treating FTD may predict efficacy in more common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. A variety of regulatory incentives, clinical features of FTD such as rapid disease progression, and relatively pure molecular pathology suggest that there are advantages to developing drugs for FTD as compared with other more common neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. In March 2011, the Frontotemporal Degeneration Treatment Study Group sponsored a conference entitled ”FTD, the Next Therapeutic Frontier,“ which focused on preclinical aspects of FTD drug development. The goal of the meeting was to promote collaborations between academic researchers and biotechnology and pharmaceutical researchers to accelerate the development of new treatments for FTD. Here we report the key findings from the conference, including the rationale for FTD drug development; epidemiological, genetic, and neuropathological features of FTD; FTD animal models and how best to use them; and examples of successful drug development collaborations in other neurodegenerative diseases.
  Adam L. Boxer , Michael Gold , Edward Huey , William T. Hu , Howard Rosen , Joel Kramer , Fen-Biao Gao , Edward A. Burton , Tiffany Chow , Aimee Kao , Blair R. Leavitt , Bruce Lamb , Megan Grether , David Knopman , David Knopman , Ian R. Mackenzie , Laura Mitic , Erik D. Roberson , Daniel Van Kammen , Marc Cantillon , Kathleen Zahs , George Jackson , Stephen Salloway , John Morris , Gary Tong , Howard Feldman , Howard Fillit , Susan Dickinson , Zaven S. Khachaturian , Margaret Sutherland , Susan Abushakra , Joseph Lewcock , Robert Farese , Robert O. Kenet , Frank LaFerla , Steve Perrin , Steve Whitaker , Lawrence Honig , Marsel M. Mesulam , Brad Boeve , Murray Grossman , Bruce L. Miller and Jeffrey L. Cummings
  Frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) encompasses a spectrum of related neurodegenerative disorders with behavioral, language, and motor phenotypes for which there are currently no effective therapies. This is the second of two articles that summarize the presentations and discussions that occurred at two symposia in 2011 sponsored by the Frontotemporal Degeneration Treatment Study Group, a collaborative group of academic and industry researchers that is devoted to developing treatments for FTD. This article discusses the current status of FTD clinical research that is relevant to the conduct of clinical trials, and why FTD research may be an attractive pathway for developing therapies for neurodegenerative disorders. The clinical and molecular features of FTD, including rapid disease progression and relatively pure molecular pathology, suggest that there are advantages to developing drugs for FTD as compared with other dementias. FTD qualifies as orphan indication, providing additional advantages for drug development. Two recent sets of consensus diagnostic criteria will facilitate the identification of patients with FTD, and a variety of neuropsychological, functional, and behavioral scales have been shown to be sensitive to disease progression. Moreover, quantitative neuroimaging measurements demonstrate progressive brain atrophy in FTD at rates that may surpass Alzheimer's disease. Finally, the similarities between FTD and other neurodegenerative diseases with drug development efforts already underway suggest that FTD researchers will be able to draw on this experience to create a road map for FTD drug development. We conclude that FTD research has reached sufficient maturity to pursue clinical development of specific FTD therapies.
 
 
 
Copyright   |   Desclaimer   |    Privacy Policy   |   Browsers   |   Accessibility